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Mehman

Switching Paint Ranges

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Right then. I'm looking to switch to Reaper paints from Citadel for various reasons and would like to know if there are any tips or tricks for doing this. I figure this forum is the best place to ask. Plus, I like you people already. Y'all are my kind of people. Well, most of you. Except that one person...

 

I've gotten a spreadsheet off the intertubes that has a rough guess about colour matches for the two ranges (including a few others, too) so I know which paints are similar. I'm going to continue to use Citadel's metallic and shade range as I'm used to the former and the latter are better than anything else I've seen barring what I can create - that is, unless someone can convince me otherwise.

 

Here's my biggest problem: I own most of the range from the other company. I think I'm missing two colours out of the bunch. Should I bother switching at this point? Am I too far in to do this? It's not like I'm running out of paint every week - those paint pots last a while in this house - so replacing them as they get used is going to take a long time. That's fine, I guess. I just want the shiny new stuff now.

 

Other than replacement, is there anything else I need to know to ease the process? Blocks of 54 paints at a time seems reasonable enough but, then again, this is coming from the guy that buys all the models for one solo campaign just to switch to another setting. That level of "reasonable" is what you're working with on this query.

 

If this isn't in the right place for this post, please move it / delete it / kill it with fire. I'm still figuring the in's and out's of this particular forum. (I did notice there was no reception table in the lobby, though.)

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Eh, it's a pretty relaxed forum. We don't have an introductions thread anywhere that I know of, but you're welcome to pull up a chair.

 

As for paint ranges, I'm worse than useless for that*, but lots of people around here have extensive knowledge of many paint ranges and will probably show up soon to help you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*I trained as an artist and use about a dozen single-pigment pro paints to mix all my colors. It's a hobby.

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I'd say don't worry about converting to all the Reaper paints right out of the gate. There's no rule that you must be using Reaper paints to post or hang out here. Use the paints you want to use. If money isn't a huge concern, buy them in the 54 paint sets. If you're cost conscious, replace them as needed or consider ordering by triad.

 

Myself, I'm about 50% Reaper, 30% Scale75, and 5% each of GW, Vallejo, Secret Weapon and Army Painter. I don't paint armies, so I don't have to worry about matching a color from something I painted 4 years ago. I just use what's handy. Most of them were purchased to have the shiny new thing. ::D: 

 

Enjoy yourself, have fun and purchase responsibly. That means don't go hungry or upsetting the significant other too much.

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Colors aren't the only property of paint. Some paint colors flow better than others (particularly metallics vs. non-metallics), have better coverage, less separation in the bottle (including simply because they're older), etc. etc. Even within a company's range of paints, you may find you like some better than others. I'm using Army Painter's Greenskin Paint Set for a Mantic Orcs Army and prefer the paints for mass painting because they're thicker, more opaque, and brighter to go along with their washes. But I may prefer Reaper's less opaque paints with flow improver for individual miniatures.

 

I'd just replace paints as I use up colors, but, since you mention you buy entire model sets, you can always buy paints to accompany them, perhaps paints of a slightly different shade. That way, your new paints compliment your old ones, rather than replace them. Also, you can just buy Reaper paints as they come up in KickStarters or otherwise on sale, and not worry about how they replace your existing paints.

 

EDIT: I'll also add you can buy premade washes (eg. Army Painter, Secret Weapon Miniatures), artist's inks (eg. Liquitex), and other materials to supplement your hobby. There's more to miniatures than paints!

Edited by ced1106
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I'd actually suggest that (depending on your budget) you either try a few bottles of Reaper paint or one of the learn to paint kits before you commit. Seriously, the learn to paint kits cost about as much as the paints would on their own and you get a nice case, brushes, some minis and some instructions. Even if you're an amazing painter already, it's a set of paints that works for a given set of minis and you're basically getting the minis and case for free.

 

If you're just trying a few bottles I'd recommend the Bones paints, I really like them. ^_^ Last time I switched I did it a few bottles at a time and it was pretty painless.

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@Pingo - Maybe I will just pull up a chair and tell the tale that must be told: the Adventure for the Wet Palette That is Never Too Dry or Too Wet  ::D:!

 

@RouterMike - I hadn't thought about ordering by triad. That would let me spend money on models as well as paint in a single month. Nice.

 

@ced1106 - Using your advice and Mike's, I could get triads that would look nice on certain models as I go along and, when the paint I have runs out, replace my old stock at the same time. Good thinking.

 

@Littlebluberry - I've tried the different Reaper paint ranges and love them. There was some hair on a model that I had heavily converted that I wanted to be a certain shade of red and, after looking through the ranges and doing some research, I selected what I needed from MSP and MSP HD. Also, years ago, I had ordered some Reaper paint for an army that fell through. I remember the models I did paint were great looking.

 

 

Thanks for the great input everyone  ^_^!

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You could also buy a bunch of Reaper's empty dropper bottles and transfer your paints. 

^^^This.  And then replace what you need to with manufacturer of choice as they get used up or as you find colors you like or want to try.  I have paint from various manufacturers. Vallejo Game Color, Vallejo Model Color, Vallejo Panzer Aces,  Tamiya, Reaper, Mister Kit, older and newer Citadel that I transferred into dropper bottles, Polly S, Scale 75, Andrea, & P3. All get used at one point or another, depending on what I am doing/building.

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You could also buy a bunch of Reaper's empty dropper bottles and transfer your paints. 

^^^This.  And then replace what you need to with manufacturer of choice as they get used up or as you find colors you like or want to try.  I have paint from various manufacturers. Vallejo Game Color, Vallejo Model Color, Vallejo Panzer Aces,  Tamiya, Reaper,  older and newer Citadel that I transferred into dropper bottles, Polly S, Scale 75, Scale Color Fantasy & Game line, Warcolours. All get used at one point or another, depending on what I am doing/building.

 

Same as bloodhowl, I just changed some names of lines....

 

You can get 50 15ml bottles from the big river site pretty cheaply....

 

Scale 75 Metallics are the best in the world. 

 

Link to thread discussing Scale 75 paints

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Most of my paints are Reaper and Scale 75 ( indeed the best metallics) then Vallejo and a few old GW and P3 pots.

 

It all depends if you want to spend money now or a little each time.

 

I find the behaviour and consistency of Reaper and Scale 75 superior over GW paints.

Of course other people may disagree because it can be personal too.

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Well, most of you. Except that one person...

Me? Is it me?  It's me isn't it? Unless of course it's Buglips...

 

 

Legally everyone loves me and everything said about me is praise.  So even if it was me it wouldn't be me.  And that means if it's not me even if it is me then it's gotta be you if you're the only other option.  For a modest fee you can blame me for using legal trickery to make you me.  Which means legally that blames you.  But as a Legitimate Lawyer, for a hefty fee we can draft a subsection exclusion that exempts you from being me. 

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Well, most of you. Except that one person...

Me? Is it me?  It's me isn't it? Unless of course it's Buglips...

 

 

Legally everyone loves me and everything said about me is praise.  So even if it was me it wouldn't be me.  And that means if it's not me even if it is me then it's gotta be you if you're the only other option.  For a modest fee you can blame me for using legal trickery to make you me.  Which means legally that blames you.  But as a Legitimate Lawyer, for a hefty fee we can draft a subsection exclusion that exempts you from being me. 

 

 

Can I blame Oklahoma? If not, then my next idea would be to blame and/or accuse the potato for harboring deliciousness. The spotlight has fallen off of you, Buglips, and on to the starch with eyes.

 

@Xherman1964 - I had this thought last night as I was looking over the rules for Second Thunder's Open Combat: I'll still need colours for army painting. I don't/can't play large wargames anymore but I still enjoy building, converting, and painting various armies as if I still did. For detail work I can use other paints with little problem but it'll be a pain to get new paints to match what has already been painted.

 

So, I've decided to use a mixture of ranges to achieve my goals. I'll keep to using Citadel for the various main army colours and washes (er, shades) and use both Reaper MSP and MSP HD for single miniatures and details. Scale 75 looks nice enough so I'll pick up a few paints to try out the metallics. As long as I can mix black into their darkest steel to make even darker steel, I'll be a happy painter  :B):!

Edited by Mehman
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