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Domur, High Mage - Competition Mini


Talae
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I am about ready to start painting this one for my FLGS's March painting contest: http://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore/Special%20Edition%20Figures/sku-down/01601#detail/01601_p_1_mp

 

There is an added twist - I am limited to eight colors (primer doesn't count). I am thinking that the store paint job should be stayed away from as a color scheme in order to stand out.

 

I like the idea of blue fire that goes from dark blue up to a near white. I also like the idea on a blend of one color to another from top to bottom of the cloak. Not sure which color(s) though.

 

Any suggestions for the rest of it?

Edited by Talae
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I was wondering because I once painted a couple of figures in three colors, one of which was white.

 

Either way, eight colors feels a little like a luxurious sort of restriction to me. It's about half my full palette, but more than enough for some fine effects.

 

Assuming black and white must be included, I might suggest a palette of: white, Burnt Sienna, Quinacridone Red, Red Iron Oxide, Hansa Yellow, Phthalo Green, Ultramarine Blue, and one of Phthalo Blue or Yellow Iron Oxide or a black.

 

These are fairly bright colors, since when mixing one can always tone down and mute colors, but one can never make them brighter.

 

Burnt Sienna mixes with white to make a flesh pink, but glazed over white comes out almost flame orange. Mixed carefully with Ultramarine Blue it makes a near-black suitable for all painting needs, and between them and white you can have a vast range of greys, blues, and browns.

 

Quinacridone Red is close to process magenta, and transparent. Red Iron Oxide is a warm brick red, and opaque. With judicious mixing and layering of the two of them (mixed with some white, or yellow, or brown), you can get a wide range of reds. Quinacridone Magenta can also be mixed with Phthalo Green to make purples and an intense blue-black.

 

Hansa Yellow is a bright, golden sun yellow

 

Phthalo Green with other colors will make just about any green you need up to the most intense. Use it sparingly because it's really strong.

 

Phthalo Blue or Yellow Iron Oxide will give you a little more versatility in mixing, one in the direction of peacock-robin's egg blues, one in the direction of mellower, richer yellows. I personally find black not so useful, but it can be used to mix fun unexpected greens (A tiny dab of black into Hansa Yellow makes a shockingly bright spring green. Mixed into Yellow Iron Oxide it makes a kind of khaki.).

Edited by Pingo
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If you are doing blue fire for the spell effect, maybe a purple to green blend for the cloak or go completely opposite blue on the color wheel and do orange to yellow.

 

I haven't received my Domur yet. I am looking forward to painting him though.

 

Looking forward to seeing what you do with yours!

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18 hours ago, Talae said:

That is really helpful!

 

Any chance you know some Reaper equivalents of those colors?

Some are direct equivalents.  Yellow Ochre (AKA Iron Oxide Yellow) is Reaper Palomino Gold.  Phthalo Green is the discontinued Clear Viridian, but Clear Green is very close.  Burnt Sienna is Reaper Chestnut Brown.  Titanium White is Reaper Pure White.

Reaper Sun Yellow is I think close to Hansa Yellow.  Reaper Rust Brown is very close to Iron Oxide Red.

Anne once said that Reaper's Ultramarine Shadow is close to the tint of Ultramarine Blue (it will be a mix, probably based on Phthalo).

I will take a stab at it and guess Reaper Clear Magenta is probably pretty close to Quinacridone Red.  And Clear Blue is probably Phthalo Blue.

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2 minutes ago, Pingo said:

Some are direct equivalents.  Yellow Ochre (AKA Iron Oxide Yellow) is Reaper Palomino Gold.  Phthalo Green is the discontinued Clear Viridian, but Clear Green is very close.  Burnt Sienna is Reaper Chestnut Brown.  Titanium White is Reaper Pure White.

Reaper Sun Yellow is I think close to Hansa Yellow.  Reaper Rust Brown is very close to Iron Oxide Red.

Anne once said that Reaper's Ultramarine Shadow is close to the tint of Ultramarine Blue (it will be a mix, probably based on Phthalo).

I will take a stab at it and guess Reaper Clear Magenta is probably pretty close to Quinacridone Red.  And Clear Blue is probably Phthalo Blue.

Thanks!

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Ok, so is it you can only use 8 colors? Or you can only use 8 paints? With the 3 primary colors and black and white, you can make almost any color. Plus, if you can use 8 paints but mix all the colors you want, how would they even know? I am a big overthinker.

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On 3/1/2017 at 9:08 PM, Pingo said:

I was wondering because I once painted a couple of figures in three colors, one of which was white.

 

Either way, eight colors feels a little like a luxurious sort of restriction to me. It's about half my full palette, but more than enough for some fine effects.

 

Assuming black and white must be included, I might suggest a palette of: white, Burnt Sienna, Quinacridone Red, Red Iron Oxide, Hansa Yellow, Phthalo Green, Ultramarine Blue, and one of Phthalo Blue or Yellow Iron Oxide or a black.

 

These are fairly bright colors, since when mixing one can always tone down and mute colors, but one can never make them brighter.

 

Burnt Sienna mixes with white to make a flesh pink, but glazed over white comes out almost flame orange. Mixed carefully with Ultramarine Blue it makes a near-black suitable for all painting needs, and between them and white you can have a vast range of greys, blues, and browns.

 

Quinacridone Red is close to process magenta, and transparent. Red Iron Oxide is a warm brick red, and opaque. With judicious mixing and layering of the two of them (mixed with some white, or yellow, or brown), you can get a wide range of reds. Quinacridone Magenta can also be mixed with Phthalo Green to make purples and an intense blue-black.

 

Hansa Yellow is a bright, golden sun yellow

 

Phthalo Green with other colors will make just about any green you need up to the most intense. Use it sparingly because it's really strong.

 

Phthalo Blue or Yellow Iron Oxide will give you a little more versatility in mixing, one in the direction of peacock-robin's egg blues, one in the direction of mellower, richer yellows. I personally find black not so useful, but it can be used to mix fun unexpected greens (A tiny dab of black into Hansa Yellow makes a shockingly bright spring green. Mixed into Yellow Iron Oxide it makes a kind of khaki.).

Thank you!  Someone other than me uses or has used Phthalo Greens and Phthalo Blues.  I always get funny looks when I mention those colors to people who have never painted.

Anything I would have said, was better said here by Pingo, even if converted to RMS or Vallejo paints. 

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27 minutes ago, Pochi said:

Ok, so is it you can only use 8 colors? Or you can only use 8 paints? With the 3 primary colors and black and white, you can make almost any color. Plus, if you can use 8 paints but mix all the colors you want, how would they even know? I am a big overthinker.

They are encouraging mixing. Eight different paints. Primer doesn't count. I would assume sealer and dullcoat don't count.

I am not the most proficient at mixing, but a challenge might be a good thing.

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11 minutes ago, Talae said:

They are encouraging mixing. Eight different paints. Primer doesn't count. I would assume sealer and dullcoat don't count.

I am not the most proficient at mixing, but a challenge might be a good thing.

A color wheel may be handy.  Remember things that oppose one another create greys and browns, depending on ratio.  That comes in very handy.  Given your text indicates primer is the only thing that doesn't count, you are down to six paints if you include both black and white.

You could try to do something monochromatic with a 'highlight' color, like red/yellow/orange.  Paint it in greyscale and then make the magic the part with all the color.  That's very difficult to pull off, and I believe you could do it.

Edited by Darkmeer
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1 minute ago, Darkmeer said:

A color wheel may be handy.  Remember things that oppose one another create greys and browns, depending on ratio.  That comes in very handy.  Given your text indicates primer is the only thing that doesn't count, you are down to six paints if you include both black and white.

I don't usually use a straight black or white, but instead brown liner and something like linen white.

I am tempted to try for shades of a similar color for most things and shades of a different (maybe opposing) similar color for a key thing or two. For instance, multiple shades of blue from clear blue up to a white for the flames, and something like a dark orange up through a yellow and maybe to a white for most everything else. I could even go orange-ish for the skin...right? 

I really need to look around at images for this one. Typical I just jump in and start painting, but the limitation of colors worries me for that.

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