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redpiano

Do any oven hardening clays handle like green stuff or magic sculpt?

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I aim to learn how to sculpt and I'm trying to find the right material for me, I really dislike Fimo, Beesputty and Sculpey, they all seem to behave exactly the same and I end up tearing up the surface with my color shapers and other tools, water as a lubricant seems to make it worse and I can't use vaseline because it makes it impossible to add more material if I need to.

 

I really like working with magic sculpt and green stuff, but as a beginner I don't want to be worried constantly about time. If I can't find a solution to the polymer clay problem and find a clay that handles similarly to epoxy putties, I -will- use green stuff or magic sculpt, but I'd like to see if anyone knows of an alternative or can tell me how to make green stuff take 48 hours to dry instead of 1-2 hours ;)

 

Thanks.

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I've tried mixing sculpey with green stuff, but usually it's just a small amount of sculpey. It extends the working time of the greenstuff just slightly, and makes it handle a little more like the sculpey. I would try mixing them in various proportions and see how you like the different mixes, and how long they last. I doubt you will get up to 48 hours that way though.

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I must get back to practicing with Fimo; I also struggle with it and have that same issue of Fimo tearing, but I've seen how easily some expert sculptors handle the stuff! Try brushing on J&J Baby Oil to smooth Fimo (and other brands of polymer clay).

 

Greenstuff: If you want it to stay soft for longer, mix in a bit of polymer clay; I've tried Fimo and Sculpey Extra Firm. They both work.

Personally, I currently favour a 60/40 or 70/30 mix of GreenStuff + BrownStuff (BrownStuff is a nuisance to mix if it's not warm). It has a short working time, but I mix very small amounts at a time and add only tiny amounts - it seems to me that what you don't add is what creates the shapes.

 

Don't forget, you can reductively sculpt as well as additively sculpt. I find the GS/BS mix fairly forgiving when it comes to carving and scraping and sanding; if I've made a mistake or I want to reduce bulk, I let the putty set hard and whittle it down later.

 

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ProCreate putty has a mixing chart that lets you extend the working time of the putty, but NOT all that much longer....

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I have used Premo and Fimo with a fair amount of success. The issue is keeping it on the metal armature. The trick is to add a bit of green stuff over the armature and immediately cover it with the polymer clay.  I like to be able to take my time with sculpting and will redo an area I don't like which is why I like the polymer clay. It is much easier to redo than green stuff. Hope this helps.

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My first thought is that if your putty surface is tearing up as your working it, your handling the tools with too much force. A very delicate touch will make for a better result. I find that holding my tools gently helps reduce hand shaking as well. 

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Hi @redpiano,

 

I work with fimo and beesputy and such.

You can get them to have a very similar consistency to greenstuff etc..

Try adding fimo mixquick to your fimo, this will allow you, to stretch the clay wiht out tearing, and will give it a tiny bit of memory.

For the smooth glossy surface, try very VERY lightly brushing over the surface with terpentine (this will make the clay soggy, you have to wait  a bit for the alcohol to evaporate)

 

Hope that helps :)

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20 minutes ago, zorro said:

Hi @redpiano,

 

I work with fimo and beesputy and such.

You can get them to have a very similar consistency to greenstuff etc..

Try adding fimo mixquick to your fimo, this will allow you, to stretch the clay wiht out tearing, and will give it a tiny bit of memory.

For the smooth glossy surface, try very VERY lightly brushing over the surface with terpentine (this will make the clay soggy, you have to wait  a bit for the alcohol to evaporate)

 

Hope that helps :)

 

Does this mixquick stuff change the handling to be more akin to green stuff or the like? It sounds like it makes it softer, I'm not sure if that would be ideal..

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Mixquick does make the clay softer. Greenstuff changes its consistency over time going from soft to hard, and my impression was you were missing the aspect of greenstuff allowing it to stretch and smooth, If you are looking for the firmness that greenstuff gets towards the time of curing, I am not sure, that are are any clays out there that are similar.

 

 

 

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I'm new, too, and therefore, not very efficient at using my putty, but here's what I've been doing: Whenever the putty starts to firm up, I quickly make it into something else. I flatten it over a piece of wire to file into a sword later, for instance. I also have a lot of rocks, lol. Or, roll into little balls to use as filler for a larger monster. Make it into a base or a staff, or some other accessory that doesn't need fine detail. Also, only mix tiny bits at a time, even if that means stopping to mix every 5 minutes.

 

But really, I've just stopped worrying about wastage and started focusing on results. There will be wastage. Absolutely there will be, no matter what material you use. There will be pieces you slave away at for hours, then decide are hideous and throw the whole thing out (even if it takes you a few months of practice to look back and think, "Damn, that's ugly compared to what I can do now.") There was one mini I made that I thought was beautiful, then I realized there were several parts I hadn't reinforced properly and she broke and after being glued back together several times without good results, it was just a total loss. It was sad, but I learned from the experience. Painters practice with paint they'll never get back. That's just how it is.

Edited by Živa
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On 3/25/2017 at 11:08 AM, Živa said:

But really, I've just stopped worrying about wastage and started focusing on results. There will be wastage. Absolutely there will be, no matter what material you use. There will be pieces you slave away at for hours, then decide are hideous and throw the whole thing out (even if it takes you a few months of practice to look back and think, "Damn, that's ugly compared to what I can do now.") There was one mini I made that I thought was beautiful, then I realized there were several parts I hadn't reinforced properly and she broke and after being glued back together several times without good results, it was just a total loss. It was sad, but I learned from the experience. Painters practice with paint they'll never get back. That's just how it is.

 

^ This ^

Plus, as you get better and put more time into the sculpting, you learn to judge how much you need for any given session.  I always plan out in my head what I am going to get done in the next hour, then mix that amount of putty.  Typically, my waste is about the size of a pea or smaller.

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