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Priming Tips and Advice, please


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I know some prefer white primer and others black primer.

I know some prefer spray primer and others paint it on.

 

Are there any pointers as to the application of primer floating

around out there, i.e. distance from mini when using spray,

weather conditions influence, number of coats, etc?

 

I know many people do this different ways and would like to see

a healthy sampling of several varying techniques.

(yes, even the air brush one, J)

 

This has been in the back of my mind since April 12th with Whiz's

post on his primer coming off ...Floquil Primer

 

I am using GW spray white primer in the honking big can and am not

always satisfied with the coverage. Until I have something to compare

it to, I can only blame human error - me- for the inconsistency. :down:

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Hey, Ichabod.

 

Now that the weather has turned for the better here in NH, I've returned to my tried and true favorite primer -- Krylon Flat Grey. It's a wonderful product. Smooth application. Never covers details. Requires loads of handling to even begin to rub off. In short, it's a rocker.

 

There are a few considerations to bear in mind when using Krylon spray primer, however.

 

1. Shake the heck out of the can. No less than two minutes on a new can. No less than a minute on a can that's been recently used.

2. Shake often during application. Watch the nozzle. Keep it clean.

3. Do not use it during humid weather. This is the worst time! I've had better success with Krylon in the dead of winter on the coldest days than I have on hot, humid days. Heat isn't as great a factor. Humidity is THE WORST. It will ruin your finish.

4. Try to make sure the weather's over 50 degrees. 60 is better. Anything over 70 is perfect. As I say, I've had success in the cold, but you really have to be quick about it.

5. Do not begin or end a spritz while the nozzle is facing the fig. Begin spraying beyond the mini and then sweep over the fig and beyond again. The beginning and end of a spritz sometimes expells globules.

6. Spray at least 6 inches from the fig. You can go closer but you risk flooding details if you spray for long.

7. Let the fig cure at least overnight. Try for 24 hours or more. The primer will harden nicely during this time.

 

And I guess that's the basic sum. Go nuts! ::D:

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Well, I recently spent a lot of time corresponding with a fan in France who wanted to know how I do EVERYTHING, but we dealt with the prep work on miniatures quite a bit.

 

I do use Flat Black from the Gunze Sangyo Acrylics to prime my miniatures. I guess from a pure mini painting standpoint I would be better off using enamels, but due to fumes/children issues, I use only non-toxic, low-fume paints. I have tried Tamiya in the past, however the Gunze once sets gets a real hard shell finish. Any paint will scratch if hit hard enough, so don't believe all that hype :poke: about enamels.

 

Anyway, with Gunze, it is thinned at a ratio of 3 to 2 with thinner. White is thinned at 5 to 4 ratio - if you want to use white, that is. I spray at 25 PSI which is WAY higher than that of what I do when working on mecha, armor or planes. The needle control is also backed off to open up the spray pattern to a larger coverage area. I use an Iwata HP-C and SmartJet compressor for my set-up. But again, I'm also doing major modeling work, so I have a better setup than what would be necessary if all you are doing is priming miniatures with an airbrush.

 

Why use an airbrush? Well, aerosol cans are indiscriminate and difficult in the extreme to control the spray/coverage. Even in the best of conditions, they can still leave a bumpy residue (orange peel) which I detest, and can run, overcoat, obscure fine details, etc. Some people may like that, but it's really a personal choice.

 

You'll never find an agreement on how best to handle priming, other than a miniature needs to be primed. I like the control over the coating and the ability to get into those crevaces that you can't with an ordinary aerosol can. Of course, it takes a bit longer to prime a miniature with an airbrush than a aerosol can, so there is that drawback. An airbrush also lacks that "gap filling" property that you can get away with on an aerosol based primer, so I do pay more attention to all the little details when prepping a mini for priming.

 

As I am not sure what will occur at ReaperCon, since I can't take my airbrush, I will probably be using a brush-on primer instead of an aerosol can. More than likely I will be bringing a whole slew of my own miniatures that are already based and primed up...

 

Here's an image of Malek Blackmarrow and the Crypt Bat Lord primed up on my workbench. You can see the smooth coat on the miniatures...

post-3-1082994736.jpg

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Thank you very much for the feedback. Never tried Krylon Flat Grey. I've been white spraying only since ... forever. I'll invest in a can.

 

Let the fig cure at least overnight. Try for 24 hours or more. The primer will harden nicely during this time.

This is one thing I think I could improve on. Currently, I wait a few hours, tops.

 

Why use an airbrush?  Well, aerosol cans are indiscriminate and difficult in the extreme to control the spray/coverage.  Even in the best of conditions, they can still leave a bumpy residue (orange peel) which I detest, and can run, overcoat, obscure fine details, etc.  Some people may like that, but it's really a personal choice.

Yeah, that's how some of them come out. Bumply or that powderish texture.

Airbrush sounds awesome, but out of budget for me at the moment.

 

I like the control over the coating and the ability to get into those crevaces that you can't with an ordinary aerosol can. Of course, it takes a bit longer to prime a miniature with an airbrush than a aerosol can, so there is that drawback. An airbrush also lacks that "gap filling" property that you can get away with on an aerosol based primer, so I do pay more attention to all the little details when prepping a mini for priming.

It shows in the quality of your work, though. I think a 1/3 of my problems start from a poorly primed figure. (Other 1/3 is color schemes and 1/3 practice/brush control)

Thanx again for all the tips. ::):

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This is how I do it and why:

 

BLACK primer:

 

A) because it allows for spots to missed during painting if you're doing quick, mass numbers.

 

B) it acts as a dark shade or ink to give you at least a two color painting minimum (assuming you didn't paint in the creases).

 

C) I prefer darker subdued looking paint jobs and the black undercoat helps dampen the brightness of the overall model.

 

D) I also now prefer using a black ink wash to fill in areas where the spray primer missed. Ideally a black brush on primer is great, but they're near impossible to find it seems. Plus the ink wash seems to smooth out the base coat some.

 

WHITE primer:

 

A) when a model is primarily going to be a light - white colored scheme.

 

B) when I want to paint silver on the entire metal/steel objects on the miniature and then black ink wash over the entire area. Seems to look better than just a quicky drybrush technique.

 

C) when I want an overall brighter, colorful finish to the model.

 

As for primers themselves, I like to use a $1 spray can of flat black or white that I get from Wal-Mart (ColorPlace interior/exterior Fast Dry... front half of can is blue and the back half is white). This stuff has worked far better than the Citadel primers which I find dries in the air before getting to the model and leaves a dusty unsmooth coat. Usually I am about 8-12 inches from the model when I spray the primer.

 

Plenty of ways to do it I'm sure. However, what I do works absolutely great and I see no reason for me to change it. Never had any problems with it either. Good luck with your primering.

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Thanx, man. Lotta reading, but I did it. My new understanding seems

to be I just need to paint and paint and paint a lot. Some of my bugs

will work themselves out once I get mo' betta at the craft.

 

Or, I could keep converting and find a partner in crime to paint. :rock:

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