Jump to content

Want to get dirty?


Super Jag
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've always preferred my models to look sharp and pristeen. I've given some models (e.g.: skeletons) a dirtier, weathered look before to great effect. I think I would now like to try my hand at making a character class miniature look "battle worn" or appear to have trampled through a battle field or rough terrain.

 

Any good techniques/suggestions for getting this effect? What about battle damaged?

 

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 10
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

I personally do things like dulling down the colours slightly with a touch of grey or brown. You can try a light wash with brown for a dirty effect.

 

one of my favorite things to do on cloaks is to use a bit of brown mixed with the cloak colour at the bottom of the cloak then I blend it up into the rest of the cloak - It gives it a look as if it cloak has been dragging in the mud.

Example (second photo down ... the blonde girl, not very well done, but it was my first shot at it)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well...it depends on how high of a quality you want...

A good way to make a "table top" miniature dirty is to use a polyshades dip. Pick a dark walnut stain (or something similar), and dunk it.

 

If you are wanting display quality...I wouldn't recommend that.

 

A couple of techniques to consider would be stipple painting, glazes, and washes. All of which can give some pretty neat effects, depending on your color choices and placement

 

 

The stipple painting with thicker paint would work well in combination with a wash to dirty gaitors/pantlegs/boots/etc. The stipple provides the texture while the wash provides the "soaked in" look. There is one example I've seen where an artist actually used dirt to get the effect he was lookin' for.

 

Some thoughts anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're doing a display quality figure, you can try pastels. Modellers have been using these for decades to simulate dirt, grime and dust on models; it should work here. Just grind up some tan or brown pastels and dust them on areas you want dusty.

 

Another technique is to get a bottle of Tamiya Buff (or really and light tan), thin it to wash or greater consistency, and then apply it selectively or liberally to areas you want to look dusty or stained. Works better for gaming quality figures.

 

Don't forget to muck up the shoes/boots! Adding splotches of mud or a liberal coating od pastels/Buff paint here will go a long way to that dirty look...

 

Damon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're doing a display quality figure, you can try pastels. Modellers have been using these for decades to simulate dirt, grime and dust on models; it should work here. Just grind up some tan or brown pastels and dust them on areas you want dusty.

 

Another technique is to get a bottle of Tamiya Buff (or really and light tan), thin it to wash or greater consistency, and then apply it selectively or liberally to areas you want to look dusty or stained. Works better for gaming quality figures.

 

Don't forget to muck up the shoes/boots! Adding splotches of mud or a liberal coating od pastels/Buff paint here will go a long way to that dirty look...

 

Damon.

Lars pretty much hit the nail on the head. Most armor/plane/mecha modelers use a coat of flat over their models and then go to down to "dirty" them up using dry brushing and chalk pastels. I've done my fair share of this work, and it really can make a HUGE difference. The flat coat is needed on the models to help the pastels and paint adhere to the model. Trying it over a gloss coat that you used to put your decals on is just plain frustrating.

 

Dents, rust, dust, bullet holes, etc. All fun stuff to do to add realism to your work.

 

Khaki or buff is a great neutral color for use on wear. Khaki lightens with white and just appears to have that great all over wear color especially on cloth.

 

But that's just my two cents...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Something I like to do when dealing with "mud" weathering (as on shoes or the bottom edge of cloaks, or armor) is to paint the parts that would come in contact with the ground/mud a darker shade of brown and lighten up as I work my way up the model/mini.

Dried mud tends to dry a lighter shade...sometimes almost white. By lightening the shade as you move up the model or garment, you give the impression that the higher portions are drying out (getting chalky and lighter in color) while the lower portions are still dragging in the dirt/mud.

It's a simple, neat, and convincing effect.

 

Thanks

AWhang

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...