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Wet Pallet Mold Issue

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I need help preventing the sponge in my wet pallet from molding. I'm using distilled water.  The penny thing hasn't helped.

 

I'm not sure what to try next. 

 

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I recommend adding a drop of liquid dish soap to the water. You can also try rotating out your sponges. I use all 3 tricks to keep mold at bay (old pennies, dish soap, and rotating out the sponge every so often). 

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First of all, is it really mold?  I had a similar problem and then I discovered that some paint was being pulled through the parchment paper and staining the sponge.  Assuming that it is mold here are a few things you can try.

 

1.  make sure your pennies are old.  Older pennies (I don't remember the year they switched over) have a higher copper content.

2. Use copper foil/sheeting.  I use a nice strip of copper sheeting in my wet palette.  It works better than pennies (more surface area.

3. Wash the sponge every so often.  Give it a rinse in warm water and wring it out.  If you really want to make sure you kill anything in it, you can get it damp and then toss it in the microwave for about a minute.

4. Clean the plastic palette.  Scrub out the palette (top and bottom) with soap and water.  Rinse completely.  Do not run it through a dish washer!  (I've was able to get most of the warp out, but yeah, bad idea)

5. Do all of the above until you can't take it anymore then buy a replacement sponge.  You can buy a three pack and be good for a while.  I want to say I paid less than 10 bucks for a three pack.

 

Hope that helps.

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I'm glad this was posted I use a dry palette and was thinking about (pretty much decided) to start using a wet palette.  These tips should help a lot.

 

Although I'll probably start with paper towel, parchment paper, and one of those plastic sandwich boxes.

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I went looking for SCIENCE(tm) on the topic of copper and water.  

 

Quote

...Copper ionization is the release of copper ions into the water resulting from an electrical charge passed between copper plates. Copper ions are toxic to most pathogens (such as Pythium, Phytophthora, and Xanthomonas) and plants, while the levels used to treat water are well below those that cause plant toxicity. Recent advances in controls produce consistent copper levels and reliable results. Copper is also sometimes delivered as a dissolved salt, such as copper sulfate...

 

So,

why not just get 6-8 inches of copper wire at a hardware store?

Edited by TGP
Left out the most important word ^_^
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10 hours ago, Xherman1964 said:

After a few paint sessions I also really clean the sponge.

 

 

What do you use to wash the sponge?  Dish soap?  I've had problems with the sponge shredding while washing.

 

15 hours ago, CorallineAlgae said:

I recommend adding a drop of liquid dish soap to the water. You can also try rotating out your sponges. I use all 3 tricks to keep mold at bay (old pennies, dish soap, and rotating out the sponge every so often). 

 

I've not heard of adding dish soap to the water.  Will be trying this starting tonight. 

 

7 hours ago, Dilvish the Deliverer said:

First of all, is it really mold? 

 

Based on the smell, I'm pretty sure it was mold.

 

3 hours ago, NecroMancer said:

I'm glad this was posted I use a dry palette and was thinking about (pretty much decided) to start using a wet palette.  These tips should help a lot.

 

Although I'll probably start with paper towel, parchment paper, and one of those plastic sandwich boxes.

 

As most others would attest, switching to a wet pallet was a game changer for me.  Not that my painting technique really changes, but not having your paint not dry up on your pallet while your working just opened up so many doors.  My blending has improved exponentially as a result. 

 

2 hours ago, TGP said:

why just get 6-8 inches of copper wire at a hardware store?

 

I work in I.T., so have a bunch of static protections straps that have a copper foil strip on the inside.  I'm going to be giving that a whirl to see if that helps.

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This is a little off topic but don't want to start a new thread so please forgive me.

 

When using a wet palette I still need to thin the paints, correct?  The wet palette is only to keep the paints moist and does not thin the paints on its own?

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I used lukewarm water and a drop of dishwater, but I don't rub it, I keep squeezing it, till it doesn't give dirty water anymore.

Also after a few months I change the sponge.

 

I do need to say, I use a selfmade wet pallet, not a commercial one.

I use a plastic container, a sponge...however this is a large piece of foam similar to what is used to pack minis in, the grey kind, and then I moisten it with water.

Then I put a sheet of baking paper on it.

Also when used and I don't need the same paints anymore.

I will remove the sheet, remove the water, clean the sponge and start over.

 

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Just now, NecroMancer said:

This is a little off topic but don't want to start a new thread so please forgive me.

 

When using a wet palette I still need to thin the paints, correct?  The wet palette is only to keep the paints moist and does not thin the paints on its own?

Not really. It depends on the paper that you use.  The actual Masterson's Palette paper seems to be slightly more permeable than parchment paper and can thin the paint over time.  That, as well as price is why I switched to parchment paper.

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2 minutes ago, NecroMancer said:

This is a little off topic but don't want to start a new thread so please forgive me.

 

When using a wet palette I still need to thin the paints, correct?  The wet palette is only to keep the paints moist and does not thin the paints on its own?

 

That's the idea.

Although when you wet the pallet too much your paint might run..

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2 minutes ago, NecroMancer said:

This is a little off topic but don't want to start a new thread so please forgive me.

 

When using a wet palette I still need to thin the paints, correct?  The wet palette is only to keep the paints moist and does not thin the paints on its own?

 

Actually, I have found that my wet palette seepage does thin the paint (I use a homebrewed version with paper towel and parchment paper).

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7 hours ago, Dilvish the Deliverer said:

[snip]

1.  make sure your pennies are old.  Older pennies (I don't remember the year they switched over) have a higher copper content.

[snip]

1982 was the year they switched to a copper clad zinc core penny.   So any year prior to that.   Remember to polish them every so often to keep the Cu bio-available.   1964 and prior dimes, half dollars, and silver dollars work wonderfully to as Silver is also quite toxic.

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I'm amazed at the different mold issues people are having or not having.

 

I've yet to get mold issues on mine (paint stains yes, mold no). And mine could stay wet and unused for weeks without any issue. Is it because my apartment is cold; because it's winter (less pollen or other outside organisms); because I used boiling water; because Buglips stole all my mold for himself; something else?

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