Jump to content

Sources for Historial Accuracy for Churchill Crocodile


Recommended Posts

So, I got my first tank to paint.  A big one, and I want to do it right.  Thoughts of where I can find the correct color scheme for the year I am hoping to paint it in?  I have an Osprey book on the tank (Churchill Crocodile), and it is good for the history but a bit rough on the color scheme.  I still need to read it (and some of my ASL stuff) to decide where/when I am going to place it.  I know where I would like too, but I need to make sure that they were there.  Color photos would be bully, but possibly rare.

 

Thoughts?

Edited by skippen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 11
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

What time period are we talking about? If you have the Tamiya model, it is IIRC a Churchill VII, which debut in Normandy till the end of the war. More specifically it is an upgraded version that would have been active only at the very end of the war & Korea (look at the air vents on the side of the hull; it has 3 plates each which were extra armor upgraded late into the service life of this tank).

 

Due to Lend-Lease, and the large volume of equipment supplied by the US (as well as British equipment manufactured in the US under license as well), the British adopted Olive Drab similar to US equipment in the latter half of the war in order to keep commonality with the Lend-Lease equipment. Thus your model should actually be painted OD. Ignore Tamiya's instructions (which IIRC calls for Dark Green) as these are not accurate at all.

 

A few months ago I finished construction on the non-Crocodile version of this tank, so pretty familiar with it ATM. Also my "main" hobby is 1/35 armor modelling, so I've done a little research on the subject...

 

Damon.

Edited by Lars Porsenna
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, skippen said:

OD=Olive Drab?

 

Correct. One thing I should mention about museum pieces and photos of such: a lot of time museums and gate guards are not as well maintained, and are often restored using resources of the time. Some museums are better than others, but I wouldn't trust completely the color of museum pieces as they are not always restored with accurate colors. 

 

Damon.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, that's why I am  hoping for some photos in color in action.  Museums tend to be more wrong than not, and I would really like to see some real-life wear/tear/weathering on one.  I was hoping for North Africa, but that's '42 and earlier.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, skippen said:

Yeah, that's why I am  hoping for some photos in color in action.  Museums tend to be more wrong than not, and I would really like to see some real-life wear/tear/weathering on one.  I was hoping for North Africa, but that's '42 and earlier.

 

If you are still looking for a North Africa machine, Churchill IIIs were the ones used IIRC, with the 6pder gun. AFV Club makes such a kit. Here is a review: https://www.perthmilitarymodelling.com/reviews/vehicles/afvclub/afv35153.html

 

I find AFV Club kits to be more challenging than Tamiya in terms of complexity & build quality.

 

Damon.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...