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77051: Orc Stalker: Second ever paint job


Couvs
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Nice one! Waay much better than my second ever mini.

 

For the eyes, I have learnt painfully that a good eye begins with the definition of the circumference of the eye with black or a very dark brown. So it is a good practice to paint all of the eye area with black/brown, then paint an almond shaped off white (pure white doesn't work either) defining the eye..

 

Then it is trial and error from there on.. Either:

 

a) try to place a single dark grey (again pure black doesnt work) dot

b) draw a downward dark grey line passing thru where the iris is supposed to be.. Then clean up the area around the eye.. (This is easier for me usually)

 

But never is it a single trial and BAM perfection! No.. It never is like that... So vigilance and patience are the two must have virtues for a painter ^_^ 

 

Happy painting and do not forget to enjoy the ride!

 

PS: Try to place the irises NOT at the center of the eyes. They should be a little nearer the nose.. Otherwise you get a cross-eyed look. 

Edited by VolksFest
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Another comment on brush sizes, I don't normally use anything smaller than a 00 with a only a couple specific exceptions.  The problem with really small brushes is that they don't hold much paint and the paint can dry on the brush in the time it takes you to go from the palette to the figure...especially if you're in a dry or air conditioned environment.  As mentioned before, it's all about your brush keeping a good point and not overloading the brush with paint.  And if that wasn't enough, not all brush sizes are made equal. A #0 from one company will be slightly different than a #0 from another.

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15 hours ago, VolksFest said:

Nice one! Waay much better than my second ever mini.

 

For the eyes, I have learnt painfully that a good eye begins with the definition of the circumference of the eye with black or a very dark brown. So it is a good practice to paint all of the eye area with black/brown, then paint an almond shaped off white (pure white doesn't work either) defining the eye..

 

Then it is trial and error from there on.. Either:

 

a) try to place a single dark grey (again pure black doesnt work) dot

b) draw a downward dark grey line passing thru where the iris is supposed to be.. Then clean up the area around the eye.. (This is easier for me usually)

 

But never is it a single trial and BAM perfection! No.. It never is like that... So vigilance and patience are the two must have virtues for a painter ^_^ 

 

Happy painting and do not forget to enjoy the ride!

 

PS: Try to place the irises NOT at the center of the eyes. They should be a little nearer the nose.. Otherwise you get a cross-eyed look. 

 

I'm actually debating trying to touch up/redo the eyes again at some point.  the main thing I was having trouble with was finding the perfect amount of paint on the  #0 brush and I just kept  getting too much in the eye sockets.

 

Certainly was not expecting anything anywhere near perfection though! I'm sure even a practised hand would often take at least a couple tries with details this small!

 

8 hours ago, Sergeant_Crunch said:

Another comment on brush sizes, I don't normally use anything smaller than a 00 with a only a couple specific exceptions.  The problem with really small brushes is that they don't hold much paint and the paint can dry on the brush in the time it takes you to go from the palette to the figure...especially if you're in a dry or air conditioned environment.  As mentioned before, it's all about your brush keeping a good point and not overloading the brush with paint.  And if that wasn't enough, not all brush sizes are made equal. A #0 from one company will be slightly different than a #0 from another.

 

I was actually logging in to ask if there's a particular brand I should look out for, and whether I can find said brand of brushes in Canada (it's not uncommon when I go looking for a particular brand of something that it's a real task to find here compared to the States).

 

After seeing a video on youtube that mentioned proper posture I've also found I need a lamp with a much longer neck... seems a large part of what was making this more difficult was I was hunching over the table to keep the mini in the light.  Hard to keep a steady hand like that! :D

Edited by Couvs
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Here's my attempt to redo the eyes.  when I took the pic I noticed a slight flaw on his right eye (guessing I didn't wait long enough for the white to dry?) but I think it's a VAST improvement over the first try!! it also doesn't look quite so bad when you aren't looking at it magnified like this lol. I'm quite excited! thank you all for the great tips!

20170403_202103.jpg

20170403_214257.jpg

Edited by Couvs
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Well, the first pics of that Orc are Disturbingly Happy for an Orc! Also, I do suggest that you keep at least one of your first Painted Minis as they were painted the First time. This is so you can compare how much you have improved since you began. I regret that I didn't do this with my first couple minis.

 

Anywho, Welcome to the Forums.

 

GF

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That is a great job for your second mini! The Layer Up Reaper kit has a smaller brush in it. With being limited to two brushes in a kit, I have to pick the ones the are most useful for the overall techniques. It's a bit of a similar issue with those orcs - they have really fun surfaces to drybrush with the chainmail and fur textures, but they have pretty small eyes. You'll find some humanoid figures with larger eyes than these guys. But they don't look too terrible if they're just shadowed and the eyes aren't put in, kind of like they're squinting.

 

Also what others mentioned is true - the brushes in the kits are solid for overall work, but even the best synthetic brush can't get as fine a point as a good sable, and a good sable would be prohibitively expensive to put into the kits. 

 

Sometimes brushes, even the really good expensive ones people are talking about, will have a hair or two that's a little too long. To address that, use a pair of tweezers and pull the problem hair to the side away from the other bristles, then snip or cut it off shorter. Don't pull it out with the tweezers, you don't want to make the area where the other bristles go under the metal ferrule looser, you just want to get the too long part out of the tip of your brush.

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33 minutes ago, Wren said:

That is a great job for your second mini! The Layer Up Reaper kit has a smaller brush in it. With being limited to two brushes in a kit, I have to pick the ones the are most useful for the overall techniques. It's a bit of a similar issue with those orcs - they have really fun surfaces to drybrush with the chainmail and fur textures, but they have pretty small eyes. You'll find some humanoid figures with larger eyes than these guys. But they don't look too terrible if they're just shadowed and the eyes aren't put in, kind of like they're squinting.

 

Also what others mentioned is true - the brushes in the kits are solid for overall work, but even the best synthetic brush can't get as fine a point as a good sable, and a good sable would be prohibitively expensive to put into the kits. 

 

Sometimes brushes, even the really good expensive ones people are talking about, will have a hair or two that's a little too long. To address that, use a pair of tweezers and pull the problem hair to the side away from the other bristles, then snip or cut it off shorter. Don't pull it out with the tweezers, you don't want to make the area where the other bristles go under the metal ferrule looser, you just want to get the too long part out of the tip of your brush.

 

thanks for the tip with the stray bristle!  I'm sitll wondering if there's a particular brand of brush to look for or will any sable brush pretty much be the best?

As for the Layer Up kit, I think I'll hold off and get a bit more practice with the core skills in on a few more minis and then I'll see about ordering that one

Edited by Couvs
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I have brushes all the way down to 30/0 (yeah, that's insanely small. It's a Reaper brush, btw.), but what I find is that I usually grab my rosemary & co #0 Series 33, as they have an incredible point.

I also have a couple of filberts (flat with a rounded edge) for larger areas, and of course a crate of generic #0 and #2 brushes I picked up on eBay for cheap(for priming, washing and all kinds of brush-destroying jobs)

 

For brush soap I reccommend The Masters Brush Soap, but then again, that's the one I have, so won't say anything bad about the others since I haven't tried them. A small box will last a very long time.

For brushes 'slightly beyond' normal rescue I use Vallejo Brush Restorer. (2oz bottle) That stuff is effective.

 

These are the holy commandments of the Brush;

1. Thou shall dip the brush carefully so that paint covereth the lower half of the bristles. No more.

2. Thou shallt rinse out the brush often.

3. Do not stand the wet brush with the bristles up for that way leads to destruction.

4. Do not let your brush stand bristles down in the cup, or thou shall forfeit thine brush.

5. Thou shalt not pluck the errant hair, but snip it carefully, or thine brush be forever lost.

6. If it was good enough to paint with, it is good enough to clean properly.

7. Shampoo, dish soap and hand soaps are the tools of the dark one, and any brushes touched by them will forever belong to him. 

 

 

Liquids in the bristles will slowly 'wick' their way up into the ferrule, and if they bring paint pigments in there it will push the ends of the bristles around.

Letting a brush stand with the bristles down in the cup will bend the bristles, and ruin them.

Plucking hairs that stick out will remove the 'root' from the ferule, letting the other hairs also move about.

Normal soaps remove the natural fats in the hairs.

 

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On 4/4/2017 at 10:38 AM, Gadgetman! said:

 

1. Thou shall dip the brush carefully so that paint covereth the lower half of the bristles. No more.

2. Thou shallt rinse out the brush often.

3. Do not stand the wet brush with the bristles up for that way leads to destruction.

4. Do not let your brush stand bristles down in the cup, or thou shall forfeit thine brush.

5. Thou shalt not pluck the errant hair, but snip it carefully, or thine brush be forever lost.

6. If it was good enough to paint with, it is good enough to clean properly.

7. Shampoo, dish soap and hand soaps are the tools of the dark one, and any brushes touched by them will forever belong to him. 

 

 

I demand that these seven commandments be stickied!

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