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AntiMatter

Step by Step painting the Silver Death fish

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That is a BEAUTIFUL creation/critter. Your brushwork & palette are WONDERFUL, but it is the base that I LOVE...I have a thing for bases. VERY WELL DONE!

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Amazing!

 

The eyes are very realistic!

 

I love everything about it!

Edited by Xherman1964

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This is where i hope to get one day. Thank you for sharing your techniques! The contrast between base and model really make the colours pop. I might have to get me some of those paints you mention :)

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awesome colors, I love the highlight you put on each scale, fantastic work.Im not familiar with that mini. Did you make that coral or is that part or sculpt?

Edited by Tjrez

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3 hours ago, Tjrez said:

awesome colors, I love the highlight you put on each scale, fantastic work.Im not familiar with that mini. Did you make that coral or is that part or sculpt?

 

Thanks!

 

The base actually comes with the mini. 

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BLEEPITY BLEEP BLEEP!!! That is amazing! You better be careful or someone will try to throw that fish back in the water, thinking its still ALIVE!!! Also, I've seen Taxidermied Fish on display that don't look that real!! Well done INdeed!

 

GF

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