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DefectiveDonor

Glazing replaces dry brushing but what to do with rock?

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Without drybrushing, how would you paint rocks or stones? I can't find any guides online. Items, armor, people, and so on have defined areas where it would make sense to transition colors but rocks don't(at least in my opinion)

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I don't know about other's, but I still drybrush my rocks and stones on my bases.  Lately I have been Base coating then drybrushing.  I then put down a glaze and dry brush again.

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I still drybrush rocks and such too.  But I also use a wash/glaze.  Railroad modelers (and I since I learned this way) paint the rocks white, then glaze 2 or 3 different colors on top--some in different areas, some overlapping, all while still wet.  Usually an ochre, a medium to dark brown, and a very dark brown or black comprise the glaze colors.  Be sloppy and let the paint go where it wants to.

 

Sometimes I basecoat black with everything else, then drybrush heavily with white or a pale gray, THEN play with some very thin washes/glazes.

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There's nothing inherently wrong with drybrushing as a technique (though it does tend to wreck brushes). The real problem with it is that it can add texture where you don't want texture (as when you're painting skin, usually). When you're painting rocks, a bit of extra texture can make them look better, so I still use drybrushing nearly all the time when painting terrain.

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Drybrush then Secret Weapon Miniatures Stone wash, at least for underground rock.

 

Drybrush in grey and white on the edges as highlights. Wash with Stone wash. Optionally, further wash the crevices with black ink or wash. Done! 

 

pic2474973_md.jpg

 

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There is a slight modification of drybrushing called dampbrushing. In damp brushing, it's common to thin the paint at least a little. You don't wipe most of it off, but you do wick/wipe enough off that no paint will come off unexpectedly. When wiping, you make sure to form the bristle head flat/straight. (So a smooth cone with no stray hairs poking out on a round brush, and equivalent on a flat/filbert brush, not your worn out crazy hair type drybrush.) Then you carefully brush the bristle head over the texture, or sometimes even just touch it to the top of the texture. As with the best drybrushing, you build up layers of lighter colour doing this repeatedly in smaller areas.

It's a bit trickier than drybrushing as it's easy to get a streaky look if there's too much paint on the brush or you use too much pressure/scrubbing, but it's the next step up version of applying the paint using the texture of the figure. Edging (pulling the brush head perpendicular to an edge like a cloak hem to use the sculpted edge to pull paint off the brush) is a similar technique.

(Which is not to say that drybrushing rocks isn't a completely viable and reasonable technique, more just giving you additional terms to search for tutorials with.)

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Yeah, drybrushing is a technique, and can be used in conjunction with other techniques.  I probably use it on almost every miniature, usually the base (to highlight the sand/pumice).

 

Now, I will use glazes to add some different color to rock, like a bit of green or blue or purple, depending on what strikes my fancy at the time, but that will be done in addition to some drybrushing to pick out the edges of the rock.

 

 

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This rock face is every color of brown or grey:

rock_face_by_paulinemoss-d6lhnrt.jpg

...use all the colors 

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