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Arc 724

Paint Shaker of the homemade variety

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So I did a thing! 

 

Latching onto other post of similar title - most notable being @Willen's "Homemade Paint Shaker" - I wanted to create one myself. The objective was to be fast, easy and easy to manage while being multi-functional (it can still be used as a jigsaw).

 

I caught the jigsaw on sale for $10 at Harbor Freight... The Aluminum piece is a sample for some of our material we use here at work. I've seen similar shaped piece at Home Depot. You would have to cut them down and drill the holes for it. I use it cause it was free. The great thing about this is the paint bottle rests against the bolt at the bottom, the Velcro holds it in place horizontally and the rubber band holds it in place vertically. Now I will warn you it is not silent... but well worth it. I did a test on a paint i had not used in over a year: 1-Right out of the bottle, 2-Hand shaken, 3-Jigsaw Shaken. And I can tell you what, that jigsaw shaken bottle was FAR better than I thought it ever was. I mean I really shake them well when i do it with my hands but not nearly as well as that Jigsaw.

 

Hope this helps someone. Please feel free to ask question or anything. If you have any other homemade paint shaker links feel free to post them in here too so we keep them all connected. ::): 

 

  1. Removed the hardware (shiny bits) from the jig saw. Using the an allen wrench.
  2. Bent the guide rail up and out of the way. It's useless anyway for the jigsaw. I would cut it off if I had the tool.
  3. Took Angled aluminum with pre-drilled holes and screw in in place over the existing blade clamp on the jigsaw. ON TOP not under where the blade clamps in.
  4. Adhesive Velcro: Cut a length and doubled it over leaving one end ope to stick to the aluminum piece. 
  5. Cut Velcro section (opposing side) and stuck to aluminum piece
  6. Placed bottle onto new apparatus & used rubber band to secure vertical movement. (rubber band doubles as wire management when not in use)

 

5978f2a07d58a_PaintShaker01FULL.jpg.f6024331d8588d2d194daa4f4315a232.jpg

 

5978f2a0e174b_PaintShaker02Holder01.jpg.379b9e9f37dc0712b618517439899262.jpg

 

5978f2a150276_PaintShaker03Holder02Velcro.jpg.ed96828bde253ba339e6ba9e5e4d868a.jpg

 

5978f2a1b2466_PaintShaker04Holder03INUSE01.jpg.6257ae990f59f60d5b82687d178b3d57.jpg

 

5978f2a2258ab_PaintShaker05Holder04INUSE02Rubberband.jpg.a2b0f647097501e588194ba6e49dab0f.jpg

 

Paint Shaker 06 Holder 05 Well Test 01.jpg

Edited by Arc 724
added a Well picture
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1 hour ago, ub3r_n3rd said:

Very cool!

Thank you my friend. It was not too difficult either. 

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Very neat idea!

 

How would you do larger paint containers (old pro-paints for example)?

 

Use a bigger aluminum bracket, or longer strip of velcro? Or both?

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12 minutes ago, Chaoswolf said:

Very neat idea!

 

How would you do larger paint containers (old pro-paints for example)?

 

Use a bigger aluminum bracket, or longer strip of velcro? Or both?

Ut-oh... do you hear a pitter-patter? :huh:

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A friend of mine built a small paint shaker using a broken computer fan mounted on some foam blocks. The motor was fine, but some of the blades were broken, and he drilled some screws into the remaining ones to offset the center of gravity. It gives a much gentler shake than a jigsaw would, but it's not bad for something made of garbage.

 

edit: it's almost just like @Willen's device, but a little different.

Edited by ultrasquid
D'oh!
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14 hours ago, Chaoswolf said:

Very neat idea!

 

How would you do larger paint containers (old pro-paints for example)?

 

Use a bigger aluminum bracket, or longer strip of velcro? Or both?

 

Dunno, but I'll test it tonight and post a picture. ::): 

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I am always in favor of ingenuity, who knows what might came out of it!

 

I moved to a vortex which was stronger than the fan one, but still not strong enough to do some paints... or cater to my lazyness. So I might just try this if I find a jiwsaw cheap enough :ph34r:

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On 7/26/2017 at 5:29 PM, Chaoswolf said:

Very neat idea!

 

How would you do larger paint containers (old pro-paints for example)?

 

Use a bigger aluminum bracket, or longer strip of velcro? Or both?

 

 put a GW Well in and it worked fine. In the construction of his device I would recommend a slightly longer Velcro strap. The well was not to much for it but I would feel more comfortable with a longer one. 

 

I'm phasing out all my GW stuff anyway. 

 

I like this better than the clamp because there is no need fear of it sleeping out. 

 

Paint Shaker 06 Holder 05 Well Test 01.jpg

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Just went for an even simpler version of this but it was yours that gave me the inspiration. I left the blade in, covered it with duct tape to get rid of poky edges and used a metal hose clamp to hold the bottle to the blade. I have to use a wrench or screwdriver to attach/unattach the bottles but it literally takes a few seconds. Would need a bigger clamp to do GW bottles and I'd be a little worried that the cap might pop open. I'm not so concerned about them anyway because I can get into them and stir anyhow.

Edited by Zink
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12 hours ago, Zink said:

Just went for an even simpler version of this but it was yours that gave me the inspiration. I left the blade in, covered it with duct tape to get rid of poky edges and used a metal hose clamp to hold the bottle to the blade. I have to use a wrench or screwdriver to attach/unattach the bottles but it literally takes a few seconds. Would need a bigger clamp to do GW bottles and I'd be a little worried that the cap might pop open. I'm not so concerned about them anyway because I can get into them and stir anyhow.

NICE! Ya, I saw one on facebook of that similar design... might have been yours but I forgot to save the post and could not find it again to replicate it. So, working at a exterior Home improvement company, I asked one of the carpenters here and we devised my current device in about 10 mins. 

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Some of my projects are like that. Dream big, plan big, start working on it and realise I can live with basic.

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On ‎12‎/‎08‎/‎2017 at 7:59 PM, Dilvish the Deliverer said:

Cool! Less over kill than the one I was thinking of knocking together.  Was going to use a sawz-all.

 

Because anything worth doing is worth over doing.

Done it; worked great. 

 

Not nearly as nice as what the OP did to attach the bottles: I zip-tied Reaper MS paint bottles to the blade of my recip saw, just loose enough that I could wiggle the zip tie off afterwards to re-use on the next bottle but tight enough that it'd hug the neck of the bottle tight enough for it to not fly off and snug in between a couple of the saw blade's teeth to hold steady.  Went through my whole collection of paints (admittedly not as huge as those of many here) a couple times before having to replace that original zip tie.  This did not work on Vallejo paints (slightly different bottle shapes) and I did not even try on my few surviving GW's..  I may have to find my old Ryobi battery powered recip saw next time (though I really don't like those tools, the batteries never did last worth a $#!& but the multi-tool bundle it came in seemed like a good deal and the drill is still OK while the battery lasts), as my cheapo Princess Auto saw recently bit the dust (cutting down small trees in the yard) after more punishment (ie. said logging, cutting up aluminum car wheels once or twice) and improvised uses (most demanding: chucked up a long piece of steel bar in it instead of a blade and used it as what's most easily described as a concrete vibrator for a very dry mix with EXCELLENT results BTW) than it was ever designed for or, frankly, ever did anything evil enough to deserve other than coming from Princess Auto, Canada's answer to "Horrible Fright".  I don't think the paint shaker idea harmed it at all though.

 

I'd have used or at least tried my jigsaw instead, but the first time I tried it... the reciprocating saw AKA sawzall happened to be located on top of the pile o' tools.

Edited by Kang
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