Jump to content

More ReaperCon n00b Travel Questions


Recommended Posts

As the title suggests, this will be my first trip to ReaperCon!  Very excited.  ::D:

 

While I've traveled plenty in my **cough cough** years of life, I've never traveled with minis, paints, and supplies.  So some things occur to me:

 

  1. What's the best way to transport paint, given TSA restrictions on liquids?  I'm assuming I'll have to pack things into my checked baggage.  But then doesn't temperature / pressure in the cargo hold become an issue?
  2. Is there an ideal way to pack up paints for travel?  Conversely, is there a an absolutely HORRIBLE way to do so?  My current plan is to bring just a few colors, plus some of the townsfolk for light, easy painting when / if I get the chance.  (I'm planning to feel inspired.)  It seems like using the Reaper paint travel case would work well, since I could use holes not being taken up by paint bottles to hold little people.  (Most of these are Bones, so I'm not worried about breakage.)
  3. It is not lost on me that the black Reaper paint travel case could be mistaken for a handgun case.  So pack that into checked baggage, too?
  4. Is there something really obvious I'm not thinking of??

 

Thanks, oh, great and generous group mind!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I would check the paints, enclosed in a zippered plastic bag. Worst way would be loose, so that they explode all over your clothes.

 

The paint case could be mistaken, but checking that inside luggage shouldn't be an issue. I would rethink packing any painting entry into the paint case. A dollar store plastic container with the figure secured inside by poster putty has worked for me. Bones work

well that way, went a little more securely for metal.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you pack miniatures, make sure you label the case as such - our little figures look like shrapnel when viewed under x-ray.

 

"Miniatures for diplay, fragile, please handle with care" etc on the outside of the case is a good idea, because if TSA sees something that looks suspicious, they will open the suitcase to check it out.

 

If you're flying with them as a carry-on item, I believe the best advice is to open the case up so the screeners can see them, as well as "fragile, for display, etc" tags.

 

The black plastic case might be mistaken for a handgun case, but the x-ray is what you should really worry about. 

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair warning as well since I learned this from last year. 

 

If you slobber a mini with Bones glue, it will come up as a questionable substance and they will swab your case.  If you are running late this will massively set you back too.  They will also manhandle your case and be generally obtuse with your precious belongings.

 

As for transporting:

 

Paints - the paint cases inside luggage that is being checked in has been ok for us.

 

Competition pieces - I highly recommend Tablewar Cases.  It's pricey at $90.......but it's truly invaluable since it lets you show off your pieces should security need to check it.  It's also durable enough to sustain bumps and movement, as long as everything is magnetized or putty'd down.

Edited by Mr Melons
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've gotten the swab before a couple times. Going it was due to I forgot I left the Paizo gamemastery combat pad in the side pocket of my mini transport case (magnets) & Coming home. Totally spaced with my metal bits that I got in the Boneyard that year & just tossed them into a foam tray & I converted to just hold bulk amounts of figures. I did have a nice conversation with the TSA & showed her the figures & such. Each time I got the swab. The going to was the worst as I wasn't late but I hate being held up heading to a flight & yes they did mandhandle the bag enough that you feel rushed trying to put everything back together.

 

If you do get large amount of metal during ReaperCon, I highly recommend you just put them into your checked bag. I've been coming down to Reaper with large ziplock bags full of metal minis I don't want (trade material for the metal table) & all I get is the "You've been checked" TSA slip. I know that means they are doing their job. ::): 

 

The bag for TSA is a quart size bag.

" Liquids Rule. You are allowed to bring a quart-sized bag of liquids, aerosols, gels, creams and pastes in your carry-on bag and through the checkpoint. These are limited to travel-sized containers that are 3.4 ounces (100 milliliters) or less per item. "

 

When you get to the hotel, what you want to do is "gas-out" the paints as they will flow out of the bottle when you crack that cap open for the first time. Actually, same could be said when you get home. Just crack open the cap & then cap it. That should be enough to relive the pressure on the bottle.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, I use a Reaper paint caddy to transport a big collection of paints with me to, and from conventions. It was a major step up from gallon-sized zip-lock bags, but both had to ride in a checked suitcase. Neither setup has caused me any trouble although I do often get a little note saying that the TSA noticed all my tiny bottles, and pointy metal objects, and inspected the suitcase. :rolleyes:

 

I'll echo Mr. Melon's endorsement of Tablewar cases for showpiece transport. As long as you use strong enough magnets (or good museum tack) to hold things in place, they provide strong protection. I have a Mini Case (but not the latest version), and it fits easily under the seat of most airplanes.

 

Update: Has anybody tried to load the mid-sized tablewar case into an airplane overhead bin? It seems so almost there, but ever-so-slightly too big for the public TSA limits, which makes me hesitant to upgrade.

Edited by klarg1
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Note that carry-on luggage size restrictions vary by airline. Make sure whatever you carry on will work with the airline you're flying on. And if you're flying in a regional turboprop or similar aircraft, even the standard sizes might be too large.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Doug Sundseth said:

Note that carry-on luggage size restrictions vary by airline. Make sure whatever you carry on will work with the airline you're flying on. And if you're flying in a regional turboprop or similar aircraft, even the standard sizes might be too large.

 

Yeah, that's pretty much my concern. The case is much more rigid that a suitcase, so there won't be much give, and a lot of direct flights from here to the midwest (say, Indianapolis, as a random example) use the smaller regional jets, which have meaningfully smaller overhead space than the bigger airliners.

Edited by klarg1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, klarg1 said:

 

Yeah, that's pretty much my concern. The case is much more rigid that a suitcase, so there won't be much give, and a lot of direct flights from here to the midwest (say, Indianapolis, as a random example) use the smaller regional jets, which have meaningfully smaller overhead space than the bigger airliners.

 

I haven't had a issues with 737s or the equivalent handling anything that's in the allowed size range. It's when you get to DeHavilland Otters or similar aircraft that carry-ons start to become real problems. But then I try to keep the most sensitive carry-on by my feet rather than in the overhead, because I trust other passengers about as much as the guys down in the hold.

 

Maybe even less.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, klarg1 said:

 

Yeah, that's pretty much my concern. The case is much more rigid that a suitcase, so there won't be much give, and a lot of direct flights from here to the midwest (say, Indianapolis, as a random example) use the smaller regional jets, which have meaningfully smaller overhead space than the bigger airliners.

 

I would not risk taking the larger case on a regional jet. I know for a fact that the Tablewar Mini Case doesn't fit properly in the overhead all though it does still fit under the seats. The handle added just enough height but it fit on its side which is not ideal carrying show pieces. Now this was on a Bombardier Q400 which is one of the smaller regionals and their overheads are tiny, almost all carry-ons are subject to being checked at the gate.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...