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Gary Pryor

Learning to paint with Bones Pt1

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OH can't believe I forgot this....ADD BASES TO YOUR MODELS!  Plastic ones or even simple wood 1" round or square that is around 1/8 thick.  Paint them black and maybe put some green flock or some sand on top of them.  You wouldn't believe how much that ads your model even if you just paint it black.   

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Welcome to the hobby, those are great first minis!

 

Since the previous posters pretty much mentioned everything, I will just say to remember to have fun, that is the most important thing with a hobby!

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A fellow newbie here!  I started off by watching Dr. Faust painting tutorials on YouTube, they were full of good advice.  The Warhammer TV Facebook page also a bunch of 1-2 minute "quick tip" videos that were pretty neat.  I spent a lot of time stalking these forums and found tons of friendly and helpful tips.  The best thing for me has been to just post my progress and ask as many questions as I can, everyone here has been really great!  Keep up the good work, looking forward to seeing more!

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As a fellow slayer of brushes, I realized that part of my problem was that I wasn't cleaning out my brush often enough.  

 

I can't guarantee this help you, but this is what I do: after every three or four dips into the paint I give the brush a quick dunk or two in some plain/clean water and then drag the brush across some paper towels/napkins, repeat as necessary to clear the paint from the brush.  It seems to really be helping keep my current brush in working order.

 

I've also learned that I sometimes have to do weird things just because I have a whim.  There's nothing wrong with following that muse every so often.

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Get a decent brush, and get it soon. 

A #0 or even a #1 of a good quality brand(W&N, Raphael, DaVinci, WAMP, or Rosemary&Co is mostly what is considered the 'good stuff'. ) 

When dipping the brush, try to never dip more than about 1/3 of the length of the hairs. 

The hairs will slowly pull the paint up into the ferrule, and when that happens it'll spread the hairs and you lose the pointy tip. 

 

Get a brush soap. Now. 

Get into the habit of cleaning the brushes you already have, so that when your good brushes arrives, you can keep them properly maintained. 

Wet brushes should never be kept with the hairs pointed up, and must never be left with the hairs down in a cup or whatever. (bending the hairs like that tends to ruin them)

Either lay them flat, or get some sort of holder to hold them vertically. 

 

Don't be discouraged if your new 'great brush' doesn't work for you.

I tried W&N, Raphael and DaVinci before I settled on Rosemary&Co. 

 

There's brushes of all sizes out there... 

A #12 is probably too big for most painting we do, with the possible exceptions of the biggest dragons... 

A #4 is probably the biggest you'll want to consider. 

#0 and #1 are the workhorses, and if kept in good shape can also be used for detail work.

#000 may sound small... and some of them are, too. Others can be be the size of a #0 by another brand. Sizes aren't really a standard.

5/0 is small. But I can't remember the last time I used mine... 

10/0 is yeah, even smaller... 

30/0 (Yeah, they exist) are so small that it's bordering on the ridiculous. In fact, they're too small. Unless you got a humidifier going, odds are that the paint will dry in the time it takes to lift the brush from the palette to the workpiece... 

Not that you really need the #000 or smaller. A good #0 is just as pointy as the smaller ones. 

 

A #2 or #4 filbert type brush may be a good idea for painting larger areas. 

 

If someone dares you to do a 7day challenge... 

You're on your own... 

 

A fresh layer of paint may cover a multitude of sins, but a dunk in PineSol or Acetone-free Nailpolish-Remove will absolve (or dissolve) all sins.

(Don't strip all your minis for paint, even if you decide they're 'no good'. Keep some, to show you how much you've progressed. After all, Bones are Cheap! )

 

 

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Thanks for all the advice. I will try to look at it all again when I am not half asleep. Today I bought a set of cheap but very tiny synthetic brushes (with the hope of eliminating the toothpick) and one very small more expensive brush. I will look at some washes later when I can to see if they will get me a clearer idea of pigment vs water.

What kinds of things can you do to bring out details in faces? washing and dry-brushing seems to be generally less effective on rounder surfaces for me. Or perhaps just the more subtle color contrast is not making them pop like other areas.
 

Some of my paints seem a lot thinner then others straight out of the pots. On the advice of every source, I try to thin all my paints at least a little (even if they look like they don't need it)  but then the paint just won't stick where I put it. This seems even more prevalent with lighter colors. The paint just seems to run into the recesses and refuse to live on the raised surfaces. After reading above maybe I am overloading my brush? I mostly rub my brush on the edge of the palate and/or on a piece of news-print or towel before touching the model. Then I seem to either get very little  noticeable coverage and/or it running into the recesses. None of my metallic paints seem to have this issue.

In a related note, I am going to try switching to a wet palate, but I am not sure a lot of my paints are thick enough to sit and stay on a piece of parchment paper.

Related: I did an Iron Golem today and I am pretty happy with it even though I just  brushed silver over black for the entire thing.

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5 minutes ago, Gary Pryor said:

Related: I did an Iron Golem today and I am pretty happy with it even though I just  brushed silver over black for the entire thing.

 

Dry-brushed, I hope?

 

If it works for you, then it's good enough. 

Sure, we might come with suggestions on what to do, but it never means 'do it this way, your way sucks' 

It just means 'we like what you did, and we want to help you get even better'

 

Oh, and what is that 'expensive brush?

 

Faces are difficult...

(Read: I suck at them... )

 

The Dark Sword videos are good...

Here's Anne and Jen;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0k84z_QLfs

Check out all the other vids that 'DarkSword' has released. They're all taken from their DVD sets.

(Incidentally, Reaper also sell those DVDs now, and they're generally considered 'well spent money') 

All their 3 introductory sets has chapters on mixing and thinning paints, prepping the mini and all that. 

(Each artist has their own distinct style, though. Which is why there are 3 sets. )

 

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6 hours ago, Gary Pryor said:

Some of my paints seem a lot thinner then others straight out of the pots. On the advice of every source, I try to thin all my paints at least a little (even if they look like they don't need it)  but then the paint just won't stick where I put it. This seems even more prevalent with lighter colors. The paint just seems to run into the recesses and refuse to live on the raised surfaces. After reading above maybe I am overloading my brush? I mostly rub my brush on the edge of the palate and/or on a piece of news-print or towel before touching the model. Then I seem to either get very little  noticeable coverage and/or it running into the recesses. None of my metallic paints seem to have this issue.

 

That sounds like a combination of overloading the brush and possibly overthinning.

 

If the paint is flowing where you don't want it, you're using too much paint on the brush for the task. Washes want more paint, because there you're counting on the paint gathering in the detail.

 

If you're not getting significant tinting when you lay down a layer of paint, you might be overthinning. Some people like to build up colors in dozens of extraordinarily thin layers. If you have the skill and patience, you can get really nice results that way. I lack some portion of that skill and patience; I want to see noticeable change with each layer. That's mostly a style difference. Since the current method sounds like it's driving you toward the edge, I'd recommend going thicker for now and keeping the "really thin layers" as a possible technique for special effects or for when you have more experience and want to revisit it.

 

As @Gadgetman! noted, we all have different styles. If you find a technique that sounds great but just doesn't work for you, your choices are to soldier on in hopes that you'll figure out what isn't working or try a different technique. Neither of those choices is incorrect. There are painters whose work I greatly admire but whose techniques just don't fit my style; I don't use those techniques, though I try to remember that they exist, in case my style changes appropriately.

 

It sounds like you're enthusiastic about painting, so I'm sure you'll figure out a way that works for you.

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Wow.. This is a very comprehensive list of beginners-advice I have seen anywhere.. And this should tell you that you have indeed come to the right place. These are all very sound advice and I suggest you follow them well.

 

Having said that I may perhaps emphasize the Youtube channels of Sorastro and Dr. Faust who got me where I am today. Also for some more tedious and professional style with many, many many layers you can check out AGProductionsInc. 

 

The thing is there are many styles and techniques out there some of which might not be right for you for the time being.. Some you will dissmiss right away but after 40+ minis you will swear by it as the ultimate technique.. And conversely you will abondon some techniques forever as your skill develops.. 

 

The only way to know for sure is to try it out for yourself. Try each and every technique over and over again.. You might loathe wet-blending today but in time as you get more comfortable with the brush and learn viscosity (fluidity) of the thinned paint you might achieve great blends with it with much ease and speed... Or keep loathing it all the same ^_^ 

 

Welcome on board and enjoy the ride!

 

PS: The ONLY and definetive way to improve is ... wait for it... Paint and paint and paint (and think you have produced miserable horrible looking minis which in reality are NOT) and paint and paint (And come here for advice and encouragement) and paint and paint... Well you get the picture..

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