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The upper deck assembly did not want to fit in the slots. It was a super tight fit. The front rail broke getting off of the sprue, but I applied to much pressure. And one of the peg holes in the main deck was not cut all the way through, and I had to saw it out... 

 

other than that the assembly was not hard just time consuming. Lots of little parts. The masts were the hardest part on the small ship I assembled so not really looking forward to mast/sail assembly. 

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Finished! Well cannons still need to be painted but with work tomorrow this is finished for now.

 

i don't have a sir forscale so Captain Barnabus came to show scale. This is not his ship though. He's just visiting

 

as I feared the sail/mast construction was a chore. But I am well satisfied now that it is done. 

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