Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
rfusca

Bad brush?

Recommended Posts

So, I've just started recently and after much research, I figured out that I'd need a few 'throw' away brushes for dry brushing, gluing, etc, and then at least one decent brush.  I picked up a cheap variety pack of brushes from walmart for $3 and a winsor newton #1 .  My expectations on the WN were...not met.  It doesn't hold a tip well at all, the moment I touch it to anything, it starts to splay out. In fact, the cheap brushes from Walmart seem to do better. 

Bad brush possible? Or bad technique? Am I expecting too much?  I've definitely not let paint into or dry in the ferule, I rinse often, and i tend to twirl the edge of the tip to bring it to a point on the pallet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There has been some bad W&N brushes on the market. Particularly on Amazon and eBay. Some may even be fakes. 

(It should have come in a transparent plastic tube if it was a real, unused W&N)

 

Remember to follow the 7 Commandments:

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/73906-77051-orc-stalker-second-ever-paint-job/&page=2#comment-1532818

(Actually, it sounds like you're adhering to the Commandments)

 

My tip for cheap brushes is to search the Bay of Evil for 10packs of #0 and #2 brushes. 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had very much the same experience with the one Windsor & Newton brush I bought.  Decided to try a couple of other brands (Rosemary & Co., Raphael) and they were much more to my liking.  I delegated that nasty WN brush to base coating.  Somehow it's gotten better over the years, but still tends to split after a little bit of use.  

 

Sorry, that's not much help but I figured it's always nice to know that you're not the only one with the problem.  Like Gadgetman said, fake brushes have been a thing, it's part of the reason why I like my Rosemary & Co brushes--they come direct from the manufacturer.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got it off Amazon.  It had a transparent tube and *looks* like a high quality product.  If its a fake, somebody tried to make a HQ fake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is hard to say.  I have gotten bad W&N brushes in the past.  It could also be your technique. You need a lot less pressure with a sable brush than others.  I also don't like the WN larger sizes (over 0) because they have a large belly and seem hard to keep a nice point for fine work. I use my #1 for base coating and my 0 as my workhorse precision brush.  Occasionally, I'll still reach for the 00 for doing things like the White Dot from Hell.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, LittleBluberry said:

I had very much the same experience with the one Windsor & Newton brush I bought.  Decided to try a couple of other brands (Rosemary & Co., Raphael) and they were much more to my liking.  I delegated that nasty WN brush to base coating.  Somehow it's gotten better over the years, but still tends to split after a little bit of use.  

 

Sorry, that's not much help but I figured it's always nice to know that you're not the only one with the problem.  Like Gadgetman said, fake brushes have been a thing, it's part of the reason why I like my Rosemary & Co brushes--they come direct from the manufacturer.  

Do you like the Rosemary & Co? That was the other brand that I keep hearing about.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a technique issue.  Or else you got one of the super soft-bristled W&Ns.  Or your bristles may be too long for traditional miniature-painting techniques...  Pics?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, TaleSpinner said:

It is hard to say.  I have gotten bad W&N brushes in the past.  It could also be your technique. You need a lot less pressure with a sable brush than others.  I also don't like the WN larger sizes (over 0) because they have a large belly and seen hard to keep a nice point for fine work. I use my #1 for base coating and my 0 as my workhorse precision brush.  Occasionally, I'll still reach for the 00 for doing things like the White Dot from Hell.

Interesting.  As somebody new, I keep hearing largely that it will be rare to need that tiny 0 brush since even a larger brush comes to a fine point.  I suppose its largely a matter of preference and work style.

Just now, BLZeebub said:

Sounds like a technique issue.  Or else you got one of the super soft-bristled W&Ns.  Or your bristles may be too long for traditional miniature-painting techniques...  Pics?

Will take a pic when home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, rfusca said:

Do you like the Rosemary & Co? That was the other brand that I keep hearing about.

 

I like R&C brushes in that size range better than the WNs.  Davinci brushes are also good.  I always get my brushes through DickBlick.com because they are an authorized dealer for all three companies.

 

7 minutes ago, rfusca said:

Interesting.  As somebody new, I keep hearing largely that it will be rare to need that tiny 0 brush since even a larger brush comes to a fine point.  I suppose its largely a matter of preference and work style.

 

It is likely what I am used to.  When I started painting, I did everything with a 5/0 to 10/0.  My largest brush was a 00 (this was in the 90's).  As I got better and developed control, I went to larger brushes with bigger bellies so I could paint for longer.  I still prefer the 0 over the 1, but that could be that my current 1 (also a WN) is, like yours, a bit flakey.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thing that is highly recommended is that before using your brush for the first time, wash it with mastersons brush soap. This removes any glues or other particles from the bristle hairs which could cause splitting. Then use a tad bit of the soap to point it and allow to dry. A quick swirl in the water before starting to paint and reforming of the point at that time should help in most cases. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, ub3r_n3rd said:

Another thing that is highly recommended is that before using your brush for the first time, wash it with mastersons brush soap. This removes any glues or other particles from the bristle hairs which could cause splitting. Then use a tad bit of the soap to point it and allow to dry. A quick swirl in the water before starting to paint and reforming of the point at that time should help in most cases. 

I didn't do that before the first time, but I have since (right after the first usage) cleaned the brush with masters soap and allowed it to dry.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, rfusca said:

I didn't do that before the first time, but I have since (right after the first usage) cleaned the brush with masters soap and allowed it to dry.

As others have stated, some brushes are just bad. Contact the seller. See if they will refund or replace. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, ub3r_n3rd said:

As others have stated, some brushes are just bad. Contact the seller. See if they will refund or replace. 

Worth a shot! I've used it quite a bit in the last week, but I'm quite unhappy with it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like my Rosemary & Co size zero round and filbert. The size 1 and 2 I am finding I use less. The size 0 is occasionally getting a fray at the edges though, which is annoying. Better than through the center though. 

 

I got a W&N 0 and so far I like it. Thus far I've left it for more rigorous precision work. 

 

Thinking of getting some Raphael and/or Davinci ones soon. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, rfusca said:

Interesting.  As somebody new, I keep hearing largely that it will be rare to need that tiny 0 brush since even a larger brush comes to a fine point.  I suppose its largely a matter of preference and work style.

 

Actually, I wanted to comment a little deeper on this.  Yes, people are technically correct that a large brush with a good point is ideal because it can do both the fine details and the large work.  But the caveat to that is that it will only do that fine work well IF you have developed the brush control to fully control exactly how much paint is coming off of the tip or side with any given stroke.  If you have not developed that degree of control yet, it will be frustrating when using properly thinned paint because you will invariably flood an area with paint stored up in the belly of the brush. So it is all good and fine for those of us who have been doing this for years to recommend Size 2 brushes, but I bet you'll find that the vast majority of us didn't start out there.

 

Not wanting set off a Pingo storm, but human saliva in the point left to dry after a session sets the point very well.  Be warned though that even non-toxic paints still have stuff that are not great for you. never lick a brush that hasn't been cleaned.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Madog Barfog
      Since vhaidra mentioned using 1000 grit sandpaper for prep in another thread, I thought I'd throw out one of my tips.
       
      After I'm done removing flash from my mini I go over it with a nylon brush in a rotary tool. This gives me an extra smooth finish, and smooth painting is something we all pursue. Then I wash and prime as usual.
       
      Q: But doesn't that remove detail?
      A: Not that I can tell.
       
      Q: On metal minis only, or also resin/plastic/Bonesium?
      A: I've only used it on metal minis, since my experience with other materials is extremely limited. I would definitely test it on a non-metal scrap piece first, as metal is much harder than other materials.
    • By WhiteWulfe
      So for those of you who are experts on this kind of thing, I have a question that's bugging me a fair bit, and hoping to get a few answers.  Started using my Windsor and Newton Series 7 size 0 brush, which had pretty much a perfect tip to it when I bought it...  I have a few hours with this now, maybe 3, and it's been doing this since around the ten minutes in mark....
       

      ^That's how it looks right after I take it out of my paint water, and then blot the excess water off....  Well, about 95% of the time anyways, but still.
       

      ^This is what it does just lying on my desk within 2-3 minutes after the fact -well, about half the time anyways, sometimes it waits until paint goes on...
       

      ^For example of how the bristles go in odd directions and won't hold a point, this is right after a quick dip into one of the washes I'm working with at the moment, although usually the split is most of the way through the bristles.
       
       

      For reference, this is how it looked brand new (sadly, I don't have any shots of it out of the tube and with the protector off before initial use)
       
       
      So, a few questions come to mind:
      - What is happening with this?
      - Can it be fixed?
      - What can be done to prevent it from happening again?  Kind of... Okay, I won't lie, I'm rather annoyed (to use a forum appropriate wording) at a $25 CAD brush behaving in a manner none of my other brushes have (well, until they've seen a LOT of use)
       
      Thanks in advance!
    • By Guyscanwefocusplease
      My wife got me a nice set of brushes for Christmas.  Aside from two she got me a few years ago, I have never had nice brushes before.
       
      I have never properly learned how to care for brushes, but would like to do that now.
       
      What resources are out there? What should I buy?
    • By Baldur8762
      Hello all,
       
      After watching many painting tutorials I have noticed that it seems like many more professional artists use somewhat larger sized sable/kolinsky brushes than what I expected.  I am currently using a size 0 and a size 000, but it looks to me like people are using sizes 1 or 2 and they are able to maintain much finer points when painting. I am struggling to maintain a fine point while painting with both brushes and I was wondering if the larger brushes were better for that?  Maybe I am just actually painting wrong?   I am still learning a lot about paint consistency too so can that be a factor? Learning to paint with real hair brushes is much different than learning with synthetic ones. I may be the only one who thinks that, but to me, the brush just behaves differently. Thanks for your input!
    • By Genghis_Sean
      So I'm gradually gaining some confidence with this hobby, but I'm abusing and ruining my brushes.  I just broke out a 1-Reaper Pro Paint brush that I got at my FLGS and was painting some more Zombicide figures.  I was dipping and painting, and dipping and painting, and basically never rinsing since I was using the same color.  Now, I've lost my point. The brush separates at the end which makes it next to useless.  Was this from my failure to rinse?  How often do you need to, particularly when you're not switching colors?

      Also, I thought I read someone talk about brush soap, preservatives, etc.  Would they have this at my FLGS?  Please tell me what I need and some brand names so I can stop going through brushes.  Thanks.
  • Who's Online   14 Members, 2 Anonymous, 30 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...