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Coming back to painting


kanli
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Hi all,

 

I took a 6 year break from painting minis and am getting back into it with a vengeance. One of the reasons I fell in love with miniatures in 1988, when I saw Citadel’s book Heroes for Wargames, was that I loved the detail and the “pop” that could be demonstrated on such small things. It’s interesting what some time away can bring to one’s approach. I wanted to post progress here and see if anyone was painting similar models with extensive details like this. I’m taking it slow on this one, but I am getting back in a (new) groove pretty quickly. 

 

Any thoughts on stages re: armor vs base color shading first or a back and forth method are appreciated. Right now I’m shifting back and forth with both, using two water mugs; one for metallic, and one for non metallic paints. Makes painting and “corrections” much faster.

 

 

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I know it’s a GW mini, and I love Reaper. I have painted many Reaper minis and am a huge proponent of reaper paints!

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Welcome back to painting!! That's about how long my hiatus was too. I use multiple water cups too: a "dirty" cup, a "clean" cup (for second rinse and thinning), and a "soap" cup. I don't use metallics super often currently, but it is a good idea to have one for that too! 

 

On the armor, I like putting a base coat down first. It gives me an idea of overall impressions. Then I put in some shadows, and touch up the base. Then I put in highlights, and touch up base. Repeat as needed. 

 

Happy painting!

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Welcome back! I don't do GW minis currently, but I do paint PP minis so very similar in terms of levels of detail. As for method, I have generally gone inside out so to speak, starting with the hardest to reach areas and finishing those, then moving to the next area, etc. That said, I don't think there's really a wrong way to do it and I can certainly see the value in laying down an entire base coat first.

 

As for cups, I tend to have 3. One that's clean to start off a "new" brush on, one for regular paints and then one for metallics/primer (I brush on for a variety of reasons).

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Thanks for your feedback, everyone. I’m finding this part is the slowest! The back and forth highlighting/shading seems to be the most time consuming. Lots of adjusting and correcting minor slips of the brush. And I haven’t even started on the really small details yet. 

 

After everything is painted, I know there is a point I will get when to I should  accept a paint job as good enough, and start on a new piece with what I’ve learned. Otherwise I’m not sure we would ever make progress.  

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Edited by kanli
*grammar
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I’m also new to intentionally “edge highlighting”, though I’ve known of the technique forever. It’s a very tricky thing to do well, but it seems an imperative to make models pop when viewing them from over a few inches away. 

Edited by kanli
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