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Ain't No Such Thang


Dr.Bedlam
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Well, I can sort of understand. Kid lives in Highlands Ranch, a southern suburb of Denver, where one might well think that poor people don't exist, much less cowboys... although I will admit that his disbelief in private detectives was a bit of a stretch. Turns out his grandmother loves old reruns of shows like Rockford Files and stuff, and the kid got it into his head that PIs were a thing of the ancient and lost 1970s...

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Believe it or not, the Yellow Pages are still around - one gets delivered to my apartment door once every couple years, though I can't remember the last time I've ever actually used it, and I have to imagine its days are numbered.

 

I was told several years ago that when children outside the U.S. are told to draw pictures of Americans, the picture usually looks like a cowboy... I don't know how true that ever was or if it's still true, but I kind of like to imagine that most folks think "cowboys!" when they hear "American"....

 

My brother emigrated from the U.S. to Canada; his office does a sort of "ethnic pride" thing where the multicultural workforce are encouraged to dress like their traditional culture and bring traditional food for a potluck lunch.  My brother wondered "how do you dress up like a 'traditional American'?, and decided to dress like a cowboy and bring a pot of pinto beans and cornbread... the whole thing apparently went over really well, with the folks from around the world instantly recognizing the cowboy boots + jeans + belt with giant buckle + country/western shirt + cowboy hat costume, and getting very excited about it, asking many questions and getting pictures with him and the works.

 

It's not something I think about often, but as charming as Dr.Bedlam's daydream about robots on motorcycles rounding up domesticated cattle with cattle-whistles so they line up and jump in a grinder one-by-one is, it's kind of reassuring to know there are still professional cowboys out there in the U.S., Mexico, Canada, and elsewhere (my sister-in-law is related to a couple professional Canadian cowboys!)   It's kind of sad to think about how much of the food production industry has become more like factories, than traditional farms and ranches, and for some reason knowing that there are still cowboys out there does lend things a human touch.

 

I wonder if it's possible to take those know-it-all sixth-graders on "career day" field trips to visit a working ranch and private investigator's office to meet real professional cowboys, private investigators, and such in person and ask them about their jobs?  Or perhaps invite some professional cowboys or private investigators to speak at the schools?  (At least, back in my day, we had a "career day" thing at school where professionals would stop by and talk about what they do and answer kids' questions... it was actually kind of cool; I remember the undertakers' presentation vividly!)

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1 hour ago, Inarah said:

I had a similar experience with friends north of the border, adults mind you, who believed that everyone in Texas wore spurs and a hat, and rode horses everywhere. 

Imagine my shock the first time I went to ReaperCon, and found that Dallas was not in the middle of a desert with cactuses everywhere. Lots more trees than expected.

 

I never watched the TV show "Dallas" when I was young (aside from the opening credits), so the subtleties of the environment escaped me.

 

5 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

It's true. We got ours yesterday.

 

"The new phone book's here! The new phone book's here! The new phone book's ...

 

*Plonk*

 

"... in the recycling bin."

FTFY. Let's be civilized after all.

 

They still find use in propping up a table or a shelf.

 

4 minutes ago, LittleBluberry said:

My daughter didn't believe in lightning for a while in preschool, she figured it was all Photoshop.  :rolleyes:The problem with teaching kids skepticism is that they will apply it in ways you don't anticipate.  

It's part of what makes children so disturbingly amazing sometimes. They don't have the life experience to know what can or cannot exist. It's the same reason why children are sometimes the hardest to impress with magic tricks, they just accept everything they see as a Real ThingTM.

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Just now, Cranky Dog said:
18 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

It's true. We got ours yesterday.

 

"The new phone book's here! The new phone book's here! The new phone book's ...

 

*Plonk*

 

"... in the recycling bin. trash"

FTFY. Let's be civilized after all.

 

No. There is no value to putting paper (a completely renewable resource) into any sort of recycling stream. Which is why nobody will pay you to do it.

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1 hour ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

It's true. We got ours yesterday.

 

"The new phone book's here! The new phone book's here! The new phone book's ...

 

*Plonk*

 

"... in the trash."

 

Hey, the yellow pages have an important purpose. 

 

I sometimes used them as booster seats during flying lessons so that I could reach the pedals. 

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