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Methods for Eyes


Hyjynx
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Since I can't for the life of me get the seam lines and fuzzies off my Bones Succubus, thought I would use it to practice eye painting since I've only painted one mini so far. Here is my attempt from last night.

Deck tan for whites, black brown for liner. Nevermind the Skin painting, was just for cutting in the liner. I used red oil paint on a pin to make the iris. I think it turned out great, but seems to me there has to be a way to cheat at this.

The anxiety and anguish of trying over and over and having ruined it at various steps is frustrating. This one took me 3 tries.

Anyone tried using liquid watercolors for dotting the eye? seems like if you messed it up it would easily wipe off to try again. I assume I could seal it with airbrushed varnish when done. maybe use a tiny mask to cover the whites so both sides could match, etc? really fishing here....::D:

 

eyes.JPG

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That is a very good eye! Sophie would be so proud!

 

We regularly get threads concerning eye painting. There are several approaches, and all of them are filled with anxiety and anguish. One universally agreed tip is to start with the most difficult eye. Once done, the other eye will feel far easier and stress free.

 

Now, when I succeed in doing my eyes, I use masking fluid to protect them to avoid stray strokes, particularly when reworking the skin tones.

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 Eyes on a 28mm scale are just time-consuming to do, regardless of technique. Well, really good-looking eyes, anyway. Painting eyes is just a complex process, and it seems even more so since you're devoting so much effort to so small an area compared to the rest of the mini...

The only way it gets easier is with rigorous practice, which will mainly result in you being able to better read which areas of the surface will be likely to give you problems as well as learning how to adjust your technique to compensate for them on your initial brush strokes and how to more easily touch them up.

The pros don't necessarily make any fewer mistakes than the rest of us, they've just gotten to the point where their mistakes are usually smaller and easier to fix.

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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That is an excellent eye.

 

The comments above are good ones, especially the note re: practice. The only shortcuts I can suggest are...

1: just put in a dot for the iris. Eyes are similar to jewels in that light hits the top and creates a white reflection point, then travels through and out the bottom where we see the color. So if you have a round black dot for the pupil, a tiny white dot at, let's say 2 o'clock and a tiny colored dot or crescent at 8, it will read very nicely in 28mm.

2: centering the pupil is madness and often a fool's errand. move the pupil to one corner of the eye, and you will find less trouble. If you center one pupil, but don't quite hit the center for the other eye, the mini will look cross- or wall-eyed, but if both eyes are pointed to the left it is much harder to tell that one pupil is slightly larger or whatever. You also only need to make one edge appear round, because the other edge of the pupil is in the corner of the eye. As an added bonus, side-eye looks more dynamic/expressive...just decide what the mini is looking at and point the eyes that way!

 

Even with those "shortcuts" in mind, eyes are still a laborious process. Get an eyebeast or chaos beast in Bones and practice, practice, practice!

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19 hours ago, knarthex said:

In the resources section is an article called Better Davis Eyes..

Give it a read...

 

On phone so no linky...

That is the method (mostly) I used. Just wished there was a way to protect each step from the next. One slip up on the last steps and is redo lots of what you just did. Thanks everyone for the input. I'll just keep practicing.

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55 minutes ago, Hyjynx said:

That is the method (mostly) I used. Just wished there was a way to protect each step from the next. One slip up on the last steps and is redo lots of what you just did. Thanks everyone for the input. I'll just keep practicing.

 

You can seal layer by layer if you wish. To do this, you need to let a layer dry completely, then put down a thin coat of sealer and let it dry completely, then go on to the next layer. This can allow you to clean off mistakes if you hit them with water almost immediately after you make a mistake.

 

It can also result in acrylic buildup in the eye sockets that is problematic.

 

If you let the lower layers dry as you paint them, you can get almost the same effect without the sealer, though.

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