Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Hyjynx

Methods for Eyes

Recommended Posts

Since I can't for the life of me get the seam lines and fuzzies off my Bones Succubus, thought I would use it to practice eye painting since I've only painted one mini so far. Here is my attempt from last night.

Deck tan for whites, black brown for liner. Nevermind the Skin painting, was just for cutting in the liner. I used red oil paint on a pin to make the iris. I think it turned out great, but seems to me there has to be a way to cheat at this.

The anxiety and anguish of trying over and over and having ruined it at various steps is frustrating. This one took me 3 tries.

Anyone tried using liquid watercolors for dotting the eye? seems like if you messed it up it would easily wipe off to try again. I assume I could seal it with airbrushed varnish when done. maybe use a tiny mask to cover the whites so both sides could match, etc? really fishing here....::D:

 

eyes.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a very good eye! Sophie would be so proud!

 

We regularly get threads concerning eye painting. There are several approaches, and all of them are filled with anxiety and anguish. One universally agreed tip is to start with the most difficult eye. Once done, the other eye will feel far easier and stress free.

 

Now, when I succeed in doing my eyes, I use masking fluid to protect them to avoid stray strokes, particularly when reworking the skin tones.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 Eyes on a 28mm scale are just time-consuming to do, regardless of technique. Well, really good-looking eyes, anyway. Painting eyes is just a complex process, and it seems even more so since you're devoting so much effort to so small an area compared to the rest of the mini...

The only way it gets easier is with rigorous practice, which will mainly result in you being able to better read which areas of the surface will be likely to give you problems as well as learning how to adjust your technique to compensate for them on your initial brush strokes and how to more easily touch them up.

The pros don't necessarily make any fewer mistakes than the rest of us, they've just gotten to the point where their mistakes are usually smaller and easier to fix.

 

Edited by Mad Jack
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is an excellent eye.

 

The comments above are good ones, especially the note re: practice. The only shortcuts I can suggest are...

1: just put in a dot for the iris. Eyes are similar to jewels in that light hits the top and creates a white reflection point, then travels through and out the bottom where we see the color. So if you have a round black dot for the pupil, a tiny white dot at, let's say 2 o'clock and a tiny colored dot or crescent at 8, it will read very nicely in 28mm.

2: centering the pupil is madness and often a fool's errand. move the pupil to one corner of the eye, and you will find less trouble. If you center one pupil, but don't quite hit the center for the other eye, the mini will look cross- or wall-eyed, but if both eyes are pointed to the left it is much harder to tell that one pupil is slightly larger or whatever. You also only need to make one edge appear round, because the other edge of the pupil is in the corner of the eye. As an added bonus, side-eye looks more dynamic/expressive...just decide what the mini is looking at and point the eyes that way!

 

Even with those "shortcuts" in mind, eyes are still a laborious process. Get an eyebeast or chaos beast in Bones and practice, practice, practice!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the resources section is an article called Better Davis Eyes..

Give it a read...

 

On phone so no linky...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, knarthex said:

In the resources section is an article called Better Davis Eyes..

Give it a read...

 

On phone so no linky...

That is the method (mostly) I used. Just wished there was a way to protect each step from the next. One slip up on the last steps and is redo lots of what you just did. Thanks everyone for the input. I'll just keep practicing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Hyjynx said:

That is the method (mostly) I used. Just wished there was a way to protect each step from the next. One slip up on the last steps and is redo lots of what you just did. Thanks everyone for the input. I'll just keep practicing.

 

You can seal layer by layer if you wish. To do this, you need to let a layer dry completely, then put down a thin coat of sealer and let it dry completely, then go on to the next layer. This can allow you to clean off mistakes if you hit them with water almost immediately after you make a mistake.

 

It can also result in acrylic buildup in the eye sockets that is problematic.

 

If you let the lower layers dry as you paint them, you can get almost the same effect without the sealer, though.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Al Capwn
      This miniature will be roughly my third or fourth venture into the realm of oil paints. Everything, with exception to the metallics, eyeballs, and some skin highlights were done in oils. This is also my first attempt in basing in the style of James Wappel (wappellious) using Green Stuff World texture rollers, sculpey, and Vallejo texture paste.
       
      No black paint was used in this exercise. I still can't take great photographs, but eventually I will get there!
       

       
      WIP Shots:
       
    • By 72moonglum
      So I'm working on a really small figure a newish Tom Meier Halfling Druid from DarkSword Miniatures.
       
      I painted the eyes and was kind of satisfied with them but one seems to be bigger than the other, which means I think I painted the black first outside of the target eye that was sculpted. One eye is okay the other one it too big:
       

       
      so when we get really close to the figure I can see how uneven she is, but she is really, really small:
       

       
      So my first general question is, would this be enough to frustrate somebody to repaint?  
       
      So with this in mind, the "good" news is I just went from a nice pair of magnifying nerd goggles that go up to around 2.5 to some other ones that I have sitting around that are 3.5 x magnification.  So I almost feel I have a good enough view of the eyes to edit it a little bit.  I'm just wondering if it's all worth it?  Any suggestions?
       
       
       
       
    • By Pochi
      My son's DM wanted a purple beholder with red eyes.

       

       

    • By Pochi
      I painted an eyebeast for the D&D Painting class I was teaching One of the techniques we were working on was blending so I wanted to make sure that I chose colors that the techniques would show well hence the bright green and pink. The class was fun and everyone's eyebeasts turned out great!


       

    • By CashWiley
      So I've been slacking on both updating here and on my blog. Here it feels odd because I don't really paint minis these days (though I want to!) and the blog kinda died when I switched hosting away from wordpress.com, my views basically dried up. I'm active on FB but I keep my friends list very tight (no offense to anyone intended), I should open up my image folders to the public, but I hesitate to do that on FB. Here's a link to my thread from last year: 
       
       
      Anyway, I'll try to catch up a bit for year 3 (what!?!). Here's the YTD WIPs from oil portraiture class. Same model, same painting. Getting into some more advanced stuff with glazes, trying to add physical depth to the painting. At this point it's starting to get pretty luminous in some areas. The physical light on the painting can pass through some of the oil-heavy layers and pick up color from pigments along the way, hit the underlayers and shine or dull for the return journey. Cool stuff, I begin to understand the reason people say you can't appreciate an old master oil painting in a photo, you miss all the complex stuff the physical light does interacting with the layers. Each of these represents a 3 hour session, or about 2 hours of painting time.



      I've also narrowed my focus in drawing to portraiture, so I can bring up my skills for heads. Since I want to pursue figurative works, having solid portrait skills is going to be crucial, and it helps me stay focused in my studies and hopefully avoid lulls between studies. I'm taking Stan Prokopenko's portrait lessons as a premium member, but he makes most of these lessons free on his Proko youtube channel. I like to make study sheets while I watch the videos, and draw as many examples as I can. I picked up this amazing habit from Patrick Jones, it's really helpful for learning and later reference. Each sheet is 18x24 charcoal on newsprint.



      The final two lessons are charcoal portrait copies, where the reference photo is on one side of the screen and Stan draws on the other side, explaining his process as he draws. Here I've just about wrapped up the lay-in step. Charcoal on newsprint approx 11x14.


  • Who's Online   22 Members, 1 Anonymous, 35 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...