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4 hours ago, Corsair said:

Because of new Federal laws it has to have a rifled barrel, where the originals did not.

 

...firearms have to have rifled barrels? I've used unrifled muskets before....

 

We see in the prequel trilogy that Sandpeople WERE decent sharpshooters, going so far as to be a predictable hazard for Podracing courses. It is worth noting that most African and Amazonian tribes weren't real wild about the "psycho screaming frontal assault" method of warfare in real life, yet it is pretty much what you'll see in any movie involving them that was made before around 1950.

Although I find it disturbing as all hell to consider that Kenobi might have had Luke's relatives bumped off........

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8 hours ago, Erifnogard said:

 

One of my favorite quotes from Star Wars is "And these blast points, too accurate for Sand People.  Only Imperial Stormtroopers are so precise."  All I can think of when I hear it is the fact that there is somebody in the Star Wars universe less accurate than Stormtroopers.  :blink:

 

 Actually, it takes a hell of a lot of training and accuracy to be able to rapidly fire "wildly" downrange like that during a large battle and not hit anything. A significant number of casualties during the American Revolution were caused by shots aimed at other people, rather than the ones they hit.

 

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8 minutes ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

Although I find it disturbing as all hell to consider that Kenobi might have had Luke's relatives bumped off........

"From a certain point of view."

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18 minutes ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

 

...firearms have to have rifled barrels? I've used unrifled muskets before....

 

 And you don't necessarily have to have any sort of license to own a gun with an unrifled barrel, like a shotgun or musket...

 

Having a rifled barrel is (a small) part of the complex legal definition (at least in the US) of a "modern firearm", which generally needs to be registered.

 

 

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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51 minutes ago, Mad Jack said:

A significant number of casualties during the American Revolution were caused by shots aimed at other people, rather than the ones they hit.

I have no idea what you're talking about...  There were 42 holes in my first target, and uhm....  Somehow there were 58 in hubby's... 

 

...In my defense, it was my first time at the range that day, and first time shooting a firearm.... 

 

Guess that should've been purple. :p

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The federal laws on rifled barrels are hideous depending on how they have been interpreted in courts over the years. The rifling requirement in handguns is why handguns that can fire shotshells still have to have rifled barrels, ie: .45 Colt/.410 guns. This is why to have a short barreled shotgun requires a $200 tax stamp and approval.

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First thing I remember about El Dia De Muerte was the sugar skulls. They'd turn up on the street corners in the border towns, and they could be purchased for pocket change. I had to get two because "Share with your sister!" was a common refrain. Fortunately, she wasn't wild about chocolate.

 

totenkopfverkauf.thumb.jpg.51a733b0e4310f9fe92c464fb8c1b34f.jpg

 

I would later come to understand why they were doing this; at first, I thought it was some uniquely Mexican form of Halloween. No, it's apparently one of those hangovers from pre-Conquest culture what got moved to a Catholic feast day for the sake of appearances.... sorta like Halloween.

El Dia De Muerte is, at its heart, a day for remembering one's loved ones, and being with them in spirit and act. In the words of the great cartoonist Sergio Aragones, who grew up there, "Think of it as spending time with your relatives who don't happen to be around any more."

It's actually TWO holidays, El Dia De Inocentes and El Dia De Muertos; the first day is devoted to remembering infants and children who passed away, and are largely the reason for the sugar skulls (well, that, and tourists). The second day is for remembering Grandmama and Uncle Pedro and so forth. The WAY the holiday is celebrated varies wildly depending on what part of Mexico you happen to be in; different regions have different customs, ranging from cemetery picnics to Thanksgiving style feasts at home in the room with the ofrenda, a sort of photographic altar to the deceased.

It's not a big SHOWY thing, though. It used to be fairly personal from family to family, at least until the middle of the twentieth century, when folk art became a growing financial thing, because the crazy gringos will buy ANY damn thing. Now, a lot of places, you will find a great deal of DIY local art depicting calaveras, skeletal Mariachi musicians, and La Catrina, The Lady With The Big Hat, which is a sort of hangover depicting a pre-Conquest psychopomp, but we don't admit that, because the Padres don't like it. And, of course, the sugar skulls of my childhood.

day-of-the-dead-5.jpg.b5153e67edf9d2188fd05523bdc8f538.jpgMexico City is the only place that actually holds a parade.

 

Like I said, a PARADE is a big public thing, and El Dia De Los Muertos is usually a fairly low key, personal celebration. But Mexico City holds a big parade, with all the fanfare you'd expect. 

Funny thing? They didn't USED to. Apparently, a while back, they were making this James Bond movie (about this spy guy, James Bond -- perhaps you've heard of him?) and the script called for a big parade with lots of people in skull costumes. And they'd already arranged to shoot on location, get that El Dia De Muertos versimilitude, right?

But Mexico City did not HAVE a parade. So the producers said whatthehell, and BOUGHT one. The locals were happy to take the crazy gringos' money, and a parade was organized and held on short order, and filming was completed.

And the locals said to themselves, "You know what? That was FUN! We ought to do that again NEXT year!" And someone said, "Yeah.... I think we could approve city funding for this..." and lo, a parade has been held every year ever since. Blame Hollywood and James Bond. But the Mexicans aren't complaining. Not even BEFORE the turista dollars started showing up.

I was inspired to write all this because I've been told the city of Dallas, Texas, will be holding a parade as well, this coming October. It won't be exactly on El Dia De Los Muertos, but it will have calaveras and La Catrina and all the bells and whistles, and no doubt a thousand cosplayers, dancing and marching and occasionally falling down drunk. No doubt. Kind of makes me wish I could attend.

I grew up in Texas, and in early November, I often crossed the border with my family in search of sugar skulls. These days, I live in Colorado, but around Halloween, you can still find many Mexican styled and flavored treats and arts; you didn't used to, but they're here now. And now Dallas of all places is having a parade.

Culture flows and shifts and blends. Meaning persists, even when forms change. Skulls travel north.

And when I see this, I begin to understand why no one seems to be able to tell the difference between the Mayans, the Incas, and the Aztecs. Cultural flow. 

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1 hour ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

voyager-obama-domino-effect.thumb.jpg.1667073b38a6da2f434ba16a4f81fffb.jpg

 

But he always seemed such a decent chap in "Clear and Present Danger"...

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2 hours ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

First thing I remember about El Dia De Muerte was the sugar skulls. They'd turn up on the street corners in the border towns, and they could be purchased for pocket change. I had to get two because "Share with your sister!" was a common refrain. Fortunately, she wasn't wild about chocolate.

 

totenkopfverkauf.thumb.jpg.51a733b0e4310f9fe92c464fb8c1b34f.jpg

 

I would later come to understand why they were doing this; at first, I thought it was some uniquely Mexican form of Halloween. No, it's apparently one of those hangovers from pre-Conquest culture what got moved to a Catholic feast day for the sake of appearances.... sorta like Halloween.

El Dia De Muerte is, at its heart, a day for remembering one's loved ones, and being with them in spirit and act. In the words of the great cartoonist Sergio Aragones, who grew up there, "Think of it as spending time with your relatives who don't happen to be around any more."

It's actually TWO holidays, El Dia De Inocentes and El Dia De Muertos; the first day is devoted to remembering infants and children who passed away, and are largely the reason for the sugar skulls (well, that, and tourists). The second day is for remembering Grandmama and Uncle Pedro and so forth. The WAY the holiday is celebrated varies wildly depending on what part of Mexico you happen to be in; different regions have different customs, ranging from cemetery picnics to Thanksgiving style feasts at home in the room with the ofrenda, a sort of photographic altar to the deceased.

It's not a big SHOWY thing, though. It used to be fairly personal from family to family, at least until the middle of the twentieth century, when folk art became a growing financial thing, because the crazy gringos will buy ANY damn thing. Now, a lot of places, you will find a great deal of DIY local art depicting calaveras, skeletal Mariachi musicians, and La Catrina, The Lady With The Big Hat, which is a sort of hangover depicting a pre-Conquest psychopomp, but we don't admit that, because the Padres don't like it. And, of course, the sugar skulls of my childhood.

day-of-the-dead-5.jpg.b5153e67edf9d2188fd05523bdc8f538.jpgMexico City is the only place that actually holds a parade.

 

Like I said, a PARADE is a big public thing, and El Dia De Los Muertos is usually a fairly low key, personal celebration. But Mexico City holds a big parade, with all the fanfare you'd expect. 

Funny thing? They didn't USED to. Apparently, a while back, they were making this James Bond movie (about this spy guy, James Bond -- perhaps you've heard of him?) and the script called for a big parade with lots of people in skull costumes. And they'd already arranged to shoot on location, get that El Dia De Muertos versimilitude, right?

But Mexico City did not HAVE a parade. So the producers said whatthehell, and BOUGHT one. The locals were happy to take the crazy gringos' money, and a parade was organized and held on short order, and filming was completed.

And the locals said to themselves, "You know what? That was FUN! We ought to do that again NEXT year!" And someone said, "Yeah.... I think we could approve city funding for this..." and lo, a parade has been held every year ever since. Blame Hollywood and James Bond. But the Mexicans aren't complaining. Not even BEFORE the turista dollars started showing up.

I was inspired to write all this because I've been told the city of Dallas, Texas, will be holding a parade as well, this coming October. It won't be exactly on El Dia De Los Muertos, but it will have calaveras and La Catrina and all the bells and whistles, and no doubt a thousand cosplayers, dancing and marching and occasionally falling down drunk. No doubt. Kind of makes me wish I could attend.

I grew up in Texas, and in early November, I often crossed the border with my family in search of sugar skulls. These days, I live in Colorado, but around Halloween, you can still find many Mexican styled and flavored treats and arts; you didn't used to, but they're here now. And now Dallas of all places is having a parade.

Culture flows and shifts and blends. Meaning persists, even when forms change. Skulls travel north.

And when I see this, I begin to understand why no one seems to be able to tell the difference between the Mayans, the Incas, and the Aztecs. Cultural flow. 

 

My take on this:

 

 

DSCN0321.JPG

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44 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

 

My take on this:

 

 

DSCN0321.JPG

 

That's exactly what I'm talkin' about. 500 years from now, sociologists will be trying to figure out where "The Day Of The Dead" started, based on where they find the artwork buried... and precisely what, if anything, it had to do with zombies.

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Since there were Star Wars discussions, and I used to be a rabid Star Wars geek...

I always loved that the X-Wings and Y-Wings had hyperdrives, but no navigational computers, hence the Astromech droids that provided all the calculations for the Hyperspace jumps. 

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