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2 hours ago, Loim said:

Since there were Star Wars discussions, and I used to be a rabid Star Wars geek...

I always loved that the X-Wings and Y-Wings had hyperdrives, but no navigational computers, hence the Astromech droids that provided all the calculations for the Hyperspace jumps. 

 

Yeah, back in the seventies, NOBODY really believed Moore's Law. 

A thing I have gotten endless hilarity out of is the fact that the RPGs Traveller and Cyberpunk 2020, which were set in the distant future and the not quite so distant future, respectively, featured computers that, within ten years of their release, were effectively obsolete, and these days, are probably outclassed by the PHONES of most folks reading this.

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2 hours ago, Loim said:

Since there were Star Wars discussions, and I used to be a rabid Star Wars geek...

I always loved that the X-Wings and Y-Wings had hyperdrives, but no navigational computers, hence the Astromech droids that provided all the calculations for the Hyperspace jumps. 

I always wondered why they needed separate astromech droids to just sit there for no apparent reason. 

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Death Race 2000 (1975) is a glorious cheesefest, and hasn't aged too badly. It was the first thing David Carradine did after his TV show, Kung Fu, was cancelled.

Death.thumb.jpg.11060ff787fd6d96fd0d0867d54a8f3f.jpg

 

For those of you who aren't familiar: America is in decline due to general cultural ennui and Mr. President is now President For Life of a police state. To keep the people distracted, there's television and death sports; the Transcontinental Road Race, held yearly, is the greatest of these sports. The racers are judged not only on their speed and place... but by the number of civilians they manage to kill along the way... did I mention that this film is a comedy?

 

This film holds a special place in my heart; it was the second BLATANT black comedy I had ever witnessed (I'd seen Doctor Strangelove, and took a bit to get used to the idea of black comedy), and while Strangelove was a better film, I felt that Death Race was much more entertaining, due to its lowbrow humor and copious nudity (I was, I believe, eleven; gimme a break. I sneaked into Death Race while my grandmother was quite sure I was enjoying Pippi Longstocking).

 

Years later, I caught it again on cable, and enjoyed it immensely, although I was VERY surprised to realize who played the Italian gangster racer, seen above at left:
death-race-2000-21.jpg.ce198197ec837686a5de36011c0b8e8d.jpgDR2K_04.jpg.8110f2dd6e9c658d8123cf9e13d5e426.jpg ... a guy who, not long after this film, had hit it big playing an Italian boxer guy...

11787500_ori.jpg.6b49d9f7989ed1367c5c7e362666a260.jpgDavid Carradine, on the other hand, was coming off his starmaking role on Kung Fu (which while largely forgotten today, was INSANELY popular at the time), and was hoping to break into movies while also subverting the humble Chinese good guy role that had made his career. Weirdly, his antiheroic performance in Death Race succeeded, and he would go on to make a number of other films afterwards. 

Another guy I noticed was THIS one:
6864-4650.jpg.ec1f97b11d871e75f04b76c8b027ddbb.jpg...Fred Grandy as Herman the German. Grandy was typecast as nerdy types until he finally hit it big as Gopher on The Love Boat, and would later get elected to Congress. 

The film also featured Mary Woronov, the only woman in Hollywood who was allowed to play a strong woman during the seventies. 
calamityjane.jpg.82b940bfc1550b41784c7a6ab6321d9d.jpgAfter casting her, Roger Corman was dismayed to learn that she didn't know how to DRIVE. Her stunt double did the driving; in scenes where she is seen driving in close up, the car is being towed! I'm not sure about the veracity of THAT one -- how do you work in LA in the seventies and not know how to DRIVE? Amusingly, she ALSO appeared in the OTHER major movie about automotive combat: The Road Warrior.

The film was produced by B-movie legend Roger Corman, but directed by Paul Bartel, an actor who often appeared with Woronov, and he plays Frankenstein's doctor in one scene in the film. Weirdly enough, Bartel died in the year 2000.... the year this movie takes place.

The cars were reworked on the cheap by Dean Jeffries, a guy who did a lot of automotive work for Hollywood at the time. They were designed to look dangerous and futuristic... sorta funny, considering that the cars SCREAM "product of the 1970s" to modern eyes. I'm told that NONE of the reworked vehicles were street legal, which led to a number of surreptitious unannounced shoots in order to avoid police attention. It did not help that at least two of the vehicles kept breaking down, and at least one did not run at ALL; in scenes where it's seen moving, it's being towed or rolling downhill. Regrettably, my sources don't reveal exactly which vehicle it WAS....

It did well at the time of its release, as well as on cable, VHS, and DVD, ever since. At one point, ten years after its release, it was REreleased in theatres in France, under the title "Lords Of The Road." This time, Stallone got top billing.

And we will conclude with a legend. I can't verify this one, but I've heard enough that I feel safe repeating it.

bruce_lee.jpg.6c67caf99090820c6e16430cea850b6d.jpgThis'z Bruce Lee, patron saint of Cinematic Martial Arts and Dying Young At The Height Of Your Fame. You might have heard of him. Anyway, word has it that he was interested in getting a comfortable TV gig in Los Angeles, where he was raising a family at the time, and pitched an idea to the networks about a Chinese monk who, unjustly accused of crimes, flees China to the American Southwest during the Greater Cowboy Period of American history, where he is constantly beset by evil cowboy racists and must regretfully beat the crap out of them with his superior kung fu.... somewhere between a Hong Kong Shao Lin epic and a traditional Western.

The pitch hit gold with one production company, who paid Lee lavishly for his ideas and set to work pulling the production package together... and when Lee asked when he was to begin work, well, um, we liked the PITCH, but, well, um, we already hired another actor... 

Bruce Lee was apparently NOT happy about this... particularly upon learning that David Carradine had no martial arts background (Carradine HAD had some dance training, and later became an enthusiastic martial artist, but at the beginning of the show, he had no training whatsoever).

...and David Carradine played the role for three years until he left the show, reportedly because he'd suffered enough injuries filming various stunts and fight scenes that he decided there HAD to be an easier way to earn a living...

Edited by Dr.Bedlam
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In the original Sims expansion, Makin' Magic, it was possible to obtain a pet dragon; one bought an egg from Magic Town, and hatched it at home.

Sirxtommy123-Scrapbook6b.jpg.0f586d0e4ca23edbad8ad28d20da6fbc.jpgThey were cute. They'd wander around the house interacting with things, and your sims could interact with them, as well. The two things to know:

1. They ate daffodils. Make a point of planting daffodils in the yard, and be ready to replace them frequently.
2. Make a point of having a fire extinguisher or two in every room in the house, because sooner or later, the little buggers WILL start a fire.

 

000645s26.jpg.acab69dfa46cbce8fe94dca2b453dda3.jpg

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By 1982, the members of the Swedish supergroup ABBA were about done. Once consisting of two happily married couples, they were now divorced and ponderously burned out, to the point of being unable to function as a group. Annifrid Lingstad had already released a hit solo single, "I Know There's Something Going On," and the writing was pretty much on the wall after the tortured release of their final album, "The Visitors."

The record label, however, wasn't willing to give up, and attempted a commercial tie in intended to save the group: tie it to Star Wars, which was at the time STILL a mega-phenomenon and pretty much a license to print money.

Their comeback album was set for 1983, and was largely put together from studio recordings of previously unreleased material, with loops integrated from their new lead singer. The problem was that, at the time, the cast of the Star Wars films were also fairly burned out (they'd just finished Return Of The Jedi) and largely unprepared to launch into a sudden music career, with the possibility of yet more frantic hard work and a possible world tour.

However, ONE cast member was willing to give it a spin, and signed a contract with the label.

Regrettably, the band's personal problems caused the final collapse of the group before their comeback album could be finalized. The sole remnant of this very weird moment in pop culture history is the unused art for the album cover... and the frankly forgettable single, "Bring Me Solo And The Wookiee."

65395418_10218499558507676_1592514933520596992_n.jpg.29bbdceaf182391d0fbe9a342b8f53a0.jpg

Edited by Dr.Bedlam
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On 6/21/2019 at 2:23 AM, Gadgetman! said:

An easily-portable safe is kind of a stupid idea. 

The reason why cash boxes are made out of flimsy steel and with an easily-picked lock is that their only reason to exist is to stop a perp from grabbing a fistfuill and legging it. If you see anyone running with one in their hands, you can assume that he's been up to no good. 

 

A safe on the other hand buys you TIME. 

Safes are rated by how long it takes the 'average' safebreaker to get into it, or for fire to heat the insides enough that the contents are damaged.

A portable safe makes the time rating irrelevant as the crooks can take it with them and open it at their leisure.

 

In the fourth century BCE, Zhuang Zhou wrote:

 

”RIFLING TRUNKS

IF ONE IS TO GUARD and take precautions against thieves who rifle trunks, ransack bags, and break open boxes, then he must bind with cords and ropes and make fast with locks and hasps. This the ordinary world calls wisdom. But if a great thief comes along, he will shoulder the boxes, hoist up the trunks, sling the bags over his back, and dash off, only worrying that the cords and ropes, the locks and hasps are not fastened tightly enough. In that case, the man who earlier was called wise was in fact only piling up goods for the benefit of a great thief.”

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3 hours ago, Corsair said:

@Dr.Bedlam   You got me!::D:

 

Ehh. If I told the truth ALL the time, you'd get BORED.

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A group of activists who were suing the Peabody Energy Corporation quoted the song "Paradise" by John Prine, which were critical of the company's mining practices in the 70s. The Peabody Energy Corporation alleged that quoting the lyrics was inflammatory and irrelevant, and asked that the lyrics be stripped from the lawsuit. 

 

I primarily associate Mary Woronov with Rock and Roll High School for some reason :).

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837252004_RockNRollHighSchool.thumb.jpg.640c110ca2d6c2ca0f5e087b1f3393de.jpgRock & Roll High School does indeed star Mary Woronov as the villainous Principal Togar, who makes the most of her copious screen time (Woronov did GREAT villain.) Amusingly, the science teacher who changes sides and backs the students was played by Paul Bartel, who appeared in so many movies with Woronov, it led to the legend that they were married in real life (they weren't, just good friends, but this wasn't helped by Eating Raoul, where they played a married couple).

The heroine, Riff Randall, is played by PJ Soles, fresh off her glorious deaths in Halloween and Carrie. She was 28 at the time and playing a high school student. She's only seven years younger than Woronov.

Male leads were Vincent Van Patten, son of Eight Is Enough's Dick Van Patten. Vince enjoyed a brief career as a Tiger Beat heartthrob in the late seventies, and we also had Clint Howard, brother of Ron, as the businessman/high school student Eaglebauer in one of his early adult roles. I am convinced that poor man must have started losing his hair about fifteen minutes after Gentle Ben was cancelled. Eaglebauer sells dates with the popular kids, among other things. His scenes are fairly cringe inducing by today's standards...

The movie was written and pulled together before anyone knew for sure which band would be the focus of Riff's obsessions and Togar's hatred. Early choices were Todd Rundgren and Van Halen, before the producers managed to wrangle the Ramones into the production. Reportedly, the Ramones very much enjoyed the experience; Todd Rundgren has said that he very much regrets not doing the film.

Edited by Dr.Bedlam
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This is exactly the sort of thing I'd have pulled in high school, if I had thought of it. New character class for D&D -- "THREE HALFLINGS IN A TRENCH COAT."

 

1262082664_Screenshot_2019-06-28-4hmu71w4t0731-jpg-JPEG-Image-1031--1458-pixels.thumb.jpg.97df9427476e15cf0ddad7e40cc05c64.jpg

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7 minutes ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

This is exactly the sort of thing I'd have pulled in high school, if I had thought of it. New character class for D&D -- "THREE HALFLINGS IN A TRENCH COAT."

 

So if you do a google image search for this image, you get no other versions, but a "possible related search" of Bullfighting.

 

I have to say that I would pay good money to watch three halflings in a trenchcoat fighting a bull.

 

Good money.

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