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Reaperbryan

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6 minutes ago, Sirithiliel said:

also unicorns were like goats and not just horses with horns. They had beards, cloven hooves, and long tails with a tuft at the end

 

I could be wrong, but I was under the impression that "unicorn" is what you get when some guy goes to Africa and sees a rhinoceros, tells someone else what he saw, and there's a big game of Telephone, clear from Nairobi all the way back down the Silk Road to Paris.

Folks back in the 1600s believed there was a plant in the New World that grew sheep... all because someone brought some cotton back to show off, and admitted that it grew on a plant instead of being sheared off a critter.

 

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2 hours ago, Sirithiliel said:

also unicorns were like goats and not just horses with horns. They had beards, cloven hooves, and long tails with a tuft at the end

TBH, classic unicorns are adorable. I love their little cloven hooves and cute beards.

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1 hour ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

 

I could be wrong,

In this instance about 50% -ish. 

 

Quote

...but I was under the impression that "unicorn" is what you get when some guy goes to Africa and sees a rhinoceros, tells someone else what he saw, and there's a big game of Telephone, clear from Nairobi all the way back down the Silk Road to Paris.

The Rhinoceros hypothesis could be correct. But then you went all pear shaped. 

 

(The Silk Road was an East-West Trade route. It went nowhere near Nairobi and its Western terminus was not at all close to Paris.)

 

Quote

Folks back in the 1600s believed there was a plant in the New World that grew sheep... all because someone brought some cotton back to show off, and admitted that it grew on a plant instead of being sheared off a critter.

:unsure: :ik_oops:

Might have to trust-but-verify this one. 

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1 hour ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

Folks back in the 1600s believed there was a plant in the New World that grew sheep... all because someone brought some cotton back to show off, and admitted that it grew on a plant instead of being sheared off a critter.

 

 

@TGP addressed the first part of this; I'll address the second. :rolleyes:

 

Cotton was independently domesticated in the Americas, Africa, and India. The earliest use seems to have been in India in the 5th Millennium BC and it was cultivated starting about 4000 years ago. It was pretty widely used in Persia, Greece, Egypt, and Arabia. The European idea of sheep in trees can be seen in a 14th century illustration by John Mandeville, which would be well before commerce between the Americas and Europe. It's an interesting question why Europeans might have had such a wrong-headed concept when the cloth was so common around parts of the Mediterranean. I kind of suspect that might have been a sort of European Jackalope "myth".

 

(I often wonder why historians seem to assume that people a thousand years ago had no concept of absurdism. For me, I suspect that they were as capable of making up and discounting ridiculous stories as we are, but perhaps I'm wrong.)

 

Other than that, though, you had it exactly right.

 

::D:

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.................

 

What I Knew But Remembered Hazily About The Ancient Silk Road

China-Silk-Road-Map-full.jpg

Babylon to Qin Ling (more or less)

 

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In honor of talk like a pirate day I shall tell of one pirate captain and where one can go and see his treasure and actually touch some of it.

 

Some  300 and a bit years ago Samuel Bellamy, an English seaman, came to Cape Cod to seek some relatives. While there it is said he saw under an apple tree in bloom and then fell in love with one Goody Hallett. But she either had parents who didn't approve of the match or  may have been married. So Sam decided to seek his fortune and then return for her. Bellamy through his relatives and the backing of Palgraves Williams set sail for the Florida coast to hunt for treasure from the wreaked Spanish treasure fleet. By the time they had arrived the Spanish had already recovered the bulk of the gold and silver, so the crew decided to turn pirate and joined up with pirate captain Benjamin Hornigold and his first mate Edward Teach. The crew became frustrated with Hornigold's refusal to attack English ships and vote to remove him as captain,Hornigold and the pirates loyal to him including Teach leave the ship and the remaining crew elect Bellamy in his place. After taking a number of ships Bellamy and his crew capture the Whydah Gally transferring the cannon from one of his two ships to the Whydah giving the Whydah's former captain the now weapon less ship. A few months later having acquired some  four and a half tons of treasure Bellamy and crew head north toward New England and approaching the shores of Cape Cod the Whydah encounters a nor'easter and  sinks on a sandbar some 500 feet from shore. Only two of the 146 crew, prisoners, and ships boy (eleven year old John King who demanded to join the crew over the objection of his his mother when the pirates captured the ship they were passengers on) survived. Seven more of Bellamy's crew who were on a ship they had captured earlier that day that was also wrecked in the storm also survived. Of the 9 survivors six were hanged as pirates two were aquitted as pressed by the pirates (both carpenters Thomas South and Thomas Davis) the last John Julian from the Miskito Central American Tribe was sold into slavery. While 102 of the crew washed up on shore and were buried by the local coroner and wreckage was found over four miles of shoreline the bulk of the ship's cargo is not recovered. 

 

 Now fast forward to 1984 Barry Clifford using a map made by the captain who was sent to salvage the wreckage leads a dive team and discovers the wreck and in 1985 the ship is confirmed as the Whydah when the ship's bell is recovered. Diving on the wreck continues to today and you can see artifacts from the Whydah at either the Provincetown Expedition Whydah sea-lab & learning center or the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth MA.  I don't know about the Provincetown location but as part of the Yarmouth museum you have the opportunity to to touch some silver pieces of eight through some holes in plexiglass from the wreck.

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6 hours ago, Sirithiliel said:

also unicorns were like goats and not just horses with horns. They had beards, cloven hooves, and long tails with a tuft at the end

 

The whole symbolism about unicorns is rather... Freudian, especially if you consider how they are captured. ::):

 

Another point to ponder about the "sheep grow on trees" myth is that, until well into the 17th. century there is a strong belief in the theory of Spontaneous Generation: Everybody just KNOWS that if you leave a sack of grain lying about it will grow mice.

 

 

Edited by paintybeard
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20 hours ago, TGP said:

(The Silk Road was an East-West Trade route. It went nowhere near Nairobi and its Western terminus was not at all close to Paris.)

 

... I was being facetious. Nevertheless, it is good to know we have TGP,  ready to spring nimbly into action when someone is wrong on the internet, even in jest. Do feel free to point out the inaccuracies in my jokes in the future, in the interest of the eradication of exaggeration, overstatement, and other elements of humor. Perhaps it will make said jokes funnier. 

There is contemporary literature -- illustrated, even -- to support the "vegetable lamb" idea. Google "vegetable lamb" to find out what I'm talking about.

 

It is true that this idea is in fact a crock of patooey, and that even THEN, more than a few people THOUGHT so... but even now we have people who insist on believing things that are demonstrably untrue. Y'know, fake news and all that.

1341634193_220px-Vegetable_lamb_(Lee_1887).jpg.3622760f44a44105545e4158921c7072.jpg
 

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3 hours ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

.. I was being facetious.

Hmm...

We use purple for sarcasm. Obviously we need a colour for facetiousness.

Maybe bright pink?

^_^

 

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9 hours ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

 

... I was being facetious. Nevertheless, it is good to know we have TGP,  ready to spring nimbly into action when someone is wrong on the internet, even in jest. Do feel free to point out the inaccuracies in my jokes in the future,...

Noted. Will do.

 

:blues: In my defense... If I hadn’t, Doug would have. Also, this thread was originally dedicated to something besides clever jest. 

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, TGP said:

Noted. Will do.

 

:blues: In my defense... If I hadn’t, Doug would have. Also, this thread was originally dedicated to something besides clever jest. 

 

 

 

 

 

"If I hadn't done it, someone else would have" is not a defense. It's an indictment. :rock:

I am, perhaps, bein' thin skinned about it, but it irked me to think that someone thought "Good lord, Doc didn't know that the Silk Road went nowhere near Nairobi, much less Paris? I must correct this immediately." And it seemed kinda needlessly pedantic to say, "Some guy saw a rhino in Africa, and a game of Telephone commenced back across the trade routes to Europe, where, via a great many retellings by a great many people, a large grey horned megafauna critter metamorphosed into a slender horsie-goat with a narwhal spike on its forehead." Particularly when this is merely a theory.

Plainly, I shall have to be more vigilant with my comparisons and word choices in the future. Although I WAS unaware that griffons started out without wings in ancient art, and have now added that to the repertoire as far as "Hey, kids, wanna hear about where dragons and griffons came from?"

Still hurts me in my bones to think about how many priceless fossils got ground up by Chinese apothecaries as headache powder and hair growth formula or whatever.

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4 hours ago, TGP said:

Noted. Will do.

 

:blues: In my defense... If I hadn’t, Doug would have. Also, this thread was originally dedicated to something besides clever jest. 

 

 

From the first post in this thread:

 

"Tell me something. Maybe it's a fact about yourself. Or about your family/kids/pets. Your latest game or (heaven forbid) your character. A thing you learned on wikipedia or youtube or even *gasp* from a  book or other person (or goblin, wolf, or other sentient being)!"

 

I fully intend to continue to do exactly that.

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I think you need to step away from this thread for a breather for little bit, Doc. Being a bit needlessly aggressive there. TGP didn't insult you or make a big deal out of it to shame you, he just pointed something out. And in turn, you chose to mock him for it and act like he's caused you some deep insult.

When one chooses to present their jokes as though they're facts, one should expect that from time to time, someone's not going to realize that it's meant to be a joke and will correct the incorrect statement. I'm pretty sure that the intention of this thread was for anyone who wanted to share something to feel free to do so, not for it to be a one man show where other people can either play along or be publicly ridiculed.

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On a personal note, I hope that Doc will not "step away". This thread is always the first one I turn to each day. And I'm always delighted when I find that DocB has put up another of his nuggets about film, TV or whatever. I too have been guilty of sometimes missing the trust of the humour, but I'd never think that should be a reason to ask anyone to feel inhibited about posting anything, ever.

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1 minute ago, paintybeard said:

On a personal note, I hope that Doc will not "step away". This thread is always the first one I turn to each day. And I'm always delighted when I find that DocB has put up another of his nuggets about film, TV or whatever. I too have been guilty of sometimes missing the trust of the humour, but I'd never think that should be a reason to ask anyone to feel inhibited about posting anything, ever.

Ok, that's where your priorities are and that's on you, but I do happen to think that people should very much feel inhibited about posting personal attacks against other people just because they got their feathers ruffled. One's entertainment shouldn't take precedence over someone else's expectation not to be dragged through the mud.

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