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wet palette


Saul
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I'll be honest. I've yet to try one. A big part of that is that I do not (yet) have a dedicated painting area and often have to pack everything up and put it away (which involves taking it up a flight of stairs, etc.). In other words, the paint would have to be cleaned out at that point anyway because there's no way I'd be steady enough to keep it from mixing. Additionally, my mixes so far have been fairly straightforward, and thus, easily replicated. That of course should change over time as I get better at painting and better at "seeing" what colors I need for something, but as it stands now, I pretty much am base coat, one or two shades and one or two highlights.

 

All that said, I do want to try one sometime. Mrs. Gargs and I are hoping to move next year and when we get settled in the new house, we hope to have a dedicated craft room which will make things much, much easier all around.

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I've transported my wet palette with paint from CMPA back home in the car and not had terrible issues. Depends on how much thinning you did (base coats fine). Also have to keep the palette horizontal. Jiggling not the worst thing though. I also find it easier to clean than anything dry, except when I was painting using aluminum foil. 

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Yeah I wasn't so concerned about cleaning it. Though I do admit the dry palette can be a pain to clean. To that end, I tend to use the $1 plastic palettes available at Wal-Mart so when I get tired of the layered on gunk I can just toss it. But then I can also be lazy when it comes to cleaning.

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41 minutes ago, TaleSpinner said:

I use ceramic palettes and just throw them in a tray filled with water and a bit of Simple green.  By the next painting session I just hose it down and all the paint just comes right off.

I've seen the ones you use during a class of yours and they are well made and work great as well palettes.  I like the size of each well.  Not too large and their are many on it!

 

But I find that my paint dries up way too fast if I use these much.  So I tend to use them for very specific things like making a wash, etc.  And I assume your climate is similar to mine.  Well I know it is being I lived in MSP for awhile!  Very dry there and here (near Detroit), especially in the winter time.  I can't see how you keep your well palette paint useful for awhile?  Maybe speaking to that might help some with managing a well palette as well.

 

But having said all that, I use a wet palette for 95% of my painting and really love it.  When I introduce even simple ones (plastic plate, paper towel, parchment paper) to new or recent painters they are also very happy with it.

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1 hour ago, Bruunwald said:

I don't want to store wet paint out of its pots. That would be a disaster in my house. Wet palette lids are far from a guarantee.

I don't like cleaning wet palettes up. It takes about fifteen times longer than the OP suggests, but maybe physics breaks down in his house.

 

i don't store the paint.  i toss it after every painting session, which is usually 4-6 hours.  i don't have a lid on my palette because i don't store the paint.  why would it take 15 minutes to pour the water into the sink, throw the towel and parchment into the garbage, then rinse and dry the tray?  i've never even had paint touch the tray.  this description doesn't even resemble my experience with WP's and is exactly the kind of post that scared me off in the first place.  every discussion of WP's turns into this and i think maybe it's because 50 people have 50 different WP setups, some inevitably wetter, drier, or just better than the others.  i wouldn't say everyone should use one.  i would say, and am in fact saying, that everyone should try one.

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3 minutes ago, Saul said:

 

i don't store the paint.  i toss it after every painting session, which is usually 4-6 hours.  i don't have a lid on my palette because i don't store the paint.  why would it take 15 minutes to pour the water into the sink, throw the towel and parchment into the garbage, then rinse and dry the tray?  i've never even had paint touch the tray.  this description doesn't even resemble my experience with WP's and is exactly the kind of post that scared me off in the first place.  every discussion of WP's turns into this and i think maybe it's because 50 people have 50 different WP setups, some inevitably wetter, drier, or just better than the others.  i wouldn't say everyone should use one.  i would say, and am in fact saying, that everyone should try one.

I'll second this.  Never had any problem with cleanup.  I just throw out the parchment and rinse out the palette well.  I also don't use it to keep paint for days at a time.  It is really for a session (or extended session during a day).  It allows me to paint for a few hours and then pop the lid on and walk away for a bit and come back to the same paint.  Keeps it thinned nicely and flowing as well.  If I don't use a wet palette and just use a well palette then my paint dries during my painting session and becomes useless.  Which to me is much more of a pita than any issues with a wet palette.  The well palettes also take more effort to cleanup normally.  More to it than just tossing out the parchment.

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43 minutes ago, Harrek said:

I've seen the ones you use during a class of yours and they are well made and work great as well palettes.  I like the size of each well.  Not too large and their are many on it!

 

But I find that my paint dries up way too fast if I use these much.  So I tend to use them for very specific things like making a wash, etc.  And I assume your climate is similar to mine.  Well I know it is being I lived in MSP for awhile!  Very dry there and here (near Detroit), especially in the winter time.  I can't see how you keep your well palette paint useful for awhile?  Maybe speaking to that might help some with managing a well palette as well.

 

Well, first I use a humidifier in my studio in the winter.  Second, I mix enough paint in each well to fill it at least halfway.  If I need to leave it, I mist the area lightly with a water from a spray bottle and put the cover on the palette.  Finally, I am really good at telling exactly how thick my paint is on my brush.  If it is too thick, I just mix in a little water.  My problem with a wet palette is that it adds water over time, and I can't take water out of the paint, so I have to add paint to thicken it and that is a PITA when I was mixing a color on the fly in the first place.

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38 minutes ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

My main problem is that I can't seem to get the palette wet ENOUGH to keep my paint from drying in about 30 minutes...I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong; I'm following the masterson's instructions... :/

 

If you're using the Masterson paper, that's probably the reason. It's designed for heavier-body paints than what miniatures painters typically use. Very thin paints (by artists' standards, anyway) will tend to flow down through the paper.

 

 If you're using parchment paper, the method I use is to add water to the palette until the parchment starts to move easily when I touch it. At this point, the parchment is almost floating. Then I start to put down colors for use.

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3 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

If you're using the Masterson paper, that's probably the reason. It's designed for heavier-body paints than what miniatures painters typically use. Very thin paints (by artists' standards, anyway) will tend to flow down through the paper.

 

 If you're using parchment paper, the method I use is to add water to the palette until the parchment starts to move easily when I touch it. At this point, the parchment is almost floating. Then I start to put down colors for use.

That may be the issue. :/ I thought the parchment paper wouldn't let enough water through, so I've been opting for the Masterson paper. I'll have to buy some parchment, then, I guess.

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2 minutes ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

I'll have to buy some parchment, then, I guess.

 

I use parchment paper myself and it works well.  It's also very cheap.  You can get a roll in the baking section of any supermarket for about $3 and have enough to last you for years.

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I use parchment (baking) paper gotten at the grocery store (the Meijer's by you should have it PM).  Comes in a roll.  Make sure it's NOT waxed paper!  The Masterson stuff seems more like what you would use for the paints a canvas artist would use I think.  But it never worked well at all for me.

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I use the parchment and it works well for me.  I lay the parchment on the table, then put the paper towel or sponge on top and leave it like that for a few minutes to ensure the parchment is flat against it. Then invert it and put it in the container and smooth out  any bubbles.    Any significant bubbles cause big issues.

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