Jump to content
  • Optionally enter a message with your report.

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Al Capwn
      I don't have a blog, and I am not veteran or post enough content to justify making one - so while these musing may be better served in that format, I will leave it here for anyone who is interested to view and chime in. It just so happens that my best friend happens to work at Rustoleum as a colorist; so lately I have been picking his brain since he has an extensive knowledge about pigments, paint make up, and the chemical intricacies therein.
       
      As I have delved further and further into the hobby, I have been looking more into the deep subjects of color theory and how paint is made/composed. After reading James Gurney's Color and Light, as well as Michael Wilcox's Blue & Yellow Don't Make Green, I was really intrigued about what exactly paint is and how exactly color interactions work. Now I am guilty as the next person in owning WAY too many paints - not to say anything about minis!
       
      While color mixing may seem irrelevant to some, understanding how paints function can help even those of us who own a complete gamut of convenience mixed colors. This post is about exploring more of the technical and "scientific" aspects of paint and color theory to hopefully assist others in understanding the what and why of paint.
       
      Rethinking Paint Colors - Subtractive Color:
      Up until recently, I have always viewed the primary colors as Yellow, Red and Blue, and with those you can mix secondary colors; Green, Orange, and Purple. While this is technically true after a fashion, the difficulty lies with pigments themselves. Pigments do not actually *contain* color. Instead, they absorb most of the light spectrum *except* a specific wavelength of color. As Michael Wilcox states, "Of all the pigments available to the painter, none can be described as pure in hue. There is simply no such thing as a pure red, yellow or blue paint." That means chemically, there isn't a paint pigment out there that returns a pure Red - unlike in say digital art where a specifically purely calibrated hue can be made, paint is limited by the properties of the physical pigments themselves.
       
      As Michael Wilcox theorizes with a colour bias wheel (bottom-right), primary pigments almost certainly lean towards secondaries. This follows the concept of the Munsell Wheel (bottom-left). You may have heard of a split-complimentary color palette, and this is the reason why. Artistically, these have been described as "Warm" and "Cool" versions of the primaries, but scientifically, they are colors that absorb or reflect more of a particular wavelength. There are Violet-Reds (Cool Reds, often called "Crimson") and Orange-Reds (or Warm Reds, that lean more towards Orange), Violet-Blues and Green-Blues, and Orange-Yellows and Green-Yellows.
       

       
      One the concepts to understand when mixing paints is that you are not creating a color, but rather you are effectively destroying colors and what remains is what is returned to the eye. Referencing the above color bias wheel, if you were to mix a Violet-Blue and a Violet-Red together, both containing pigment(s) that return a great deal of Violet wavelength, the little remaining Blue/Orange and Red/Green wavelengths in each pigment would cancel each other out, leaving the Violet behind.  This would yield a more saturated or more pure hue of Violet. Conversely, mixing a Green-Blue and a Orange-Red ("Warm" Red) would be a very desaturated Violet, with more of a gray tone.
       
      Keep in mind that this doesn't make a color "bad"; desatured tones by including more complimentary colors is a very useful tool! In fact, for making shadows, using a great deal of complimentary colors to desaturate is a great technique. The problem is when these colors come about unexpectedly; after all, you can have a very "intense" Red and a very "intense" Blue, but mixing them may not produce a very intense Violet if they are "moving away" from each other.
       
      Now that is all being said, it is time to forget it...sort of. RGB is based upon the concept of Additive Mixing, or how colored light interacts. With additive mixing, fully saturated Red/Green/Blue light will produce White light. However, in paint pigments, it should be pretty obvious that mixing pigment primaries of Red/Yellow (or Green)/Blue together will not yield White. This is due to Subtractive Mixing, where pigments effectively destroy each other ala Thunderdome in Mad Max, and only the survivors reflect light back.
       
      A more modern approach to color theory and pigments is CMYK or Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and "Key" (or commonly known, Black). Adding these colors into the standard primaries gives us the "Yurmby" wheel. If you have looked at a color printer, for example, the colors used are NOT Blue/Red/Yellow, but rather Cyan/Magenta/Yellow. This is because due to the subtractive nature of pigment/ink mixing. These colors present a larger printable gamut (i.e. range) of color; for example, without White, it is difficult to produce a Pink tone with Red vs Magenta. A thin Magenta will read more Pink than a thin Red.
       
      Printers do not use White ink and instead leverage the paper for white, effectively printers are printing in an underpainting style. However, we as artists DO use White pigments and this makes things a bit more complicated as we do work with Tints (White) and Shades (Black).
       

       
      Like most science, the direct answer regarding an accurate color wheel is: it is complicated. For observable light, there is a bit more consistency and repeatability. However, when working with "tiny wavelength absorbing/reflecting mirrors" of pigments, things become a bit more complex. Additionally, there are other aspects that that go beyond the basics, such as the effect of specular and perception of color. It gets really heady when you start dipping into Kubelka-Monk Theory and K/S.
       
      Paint Composition:
      Most paint is made up of 3 parts:
      Pigment - particles that absorb and reflect certain wavelengths of light.
      Binder - The 'medium' or 'glue' which holds the pigment in suspension and forms a film. For acrylic paint, this is the actual acrylic part.
      Solvent - The liquid that allows paint to be viscous; as it dries, it allows the binder and pigment to harden forming the film. For acrylic paint, the solvent is water.
       
      Adjusting the ratios of these can have some interesting, and sometimes disastrous effects in terms of the stability of the paint. For example, introducing too much solvent, and the binder and pigment lattice structure can break apart. This can cause "coffee staining" or splotchy spots where the bonds pull apart, leaving areas without a film at all.
       
      More to come in future edits.
       
    • By NomadZeke
      Please use the full SKU and name of Reaper minis in the titles of your Show Off threads, per forum guidelines. You can find this information on the blister card or in the online store. I also like to give credit to the sculptor in a tag, so people can find their favorites.
       
      We have a high volume of posts generated from this challenge, which is great! But it's also creating a lot of work for the mods. Ladystorm has already urged folks to comply with these guidelines.
       
      As an works well, this challengehas been moved to be a bi-monthly challenge again. The longer time frame theoretically will give less stress to painting, and allow more complex jobs, and more sinister challenges.
       
      FAQ
      Reaper only? - No.
      If going on vacation, can I paint a mini(s) ahead to cover that time frame? - Yes.
      Are speed paints acceptable - Yes.
      Can it be a mini started previously? - Yes.
      Based or unbased? - Yes.
      Do minis for exchanges count? - Yes.
       
      NEW RULE - Size Equivilancy
      (This list is subject to change as bones 3 releases)
      Medium and smaller = 1 ea
      Simple Terrain (plain floors, walls) = 1ea
      Complex Terrain (http://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore/Terrain/latest/03518 or such) = 2 ea
      Large (Giants and the like) = 2 ea
      Huge (Most dragons, Demon Minotaur Lord, etc) = 3 ea
      Bigger (Kally, Khanjirra, etc) = half of quota rounded up
      Colossal ("Tianot,") = quota
       
      Due to the variable nature of a CAV I compare them against a generic 28mm figure and the Avatar large figure. I take height and bulk into considering if it is worth 1 or 2 figures.
      If it's not in this list, it counts as 1. (not yet updated for the CAV II/III figures)
       
       
      If you have a question on the size, please post it here, and I'll address them individually.
       
      Much like last year, the idea is to help those of us that normally paint VERY little or not as much as one would like, to start painting more.
       
      You challenge begins...now!
       
      And Our Mantra:
       
       
      Participants:
      If your name is missing, or you believe your count is incorrect, please PM me. Please note: to make counts easier, post in the bi-monthly thread and include the tag RPChallenge
       
       
      The objective:
      To paint 52+ minis throughout the course of the year via bi-monthly quota
      (each bi-monthly thread will have the quota listed as well as the master list)
      I request that when tagging your posts, please use "RPChallenge" to help with locating minis from this - I am making a more concentrated effort in 'bookkeeping' this year. If someone would be willing to assist in such, it would be much appreciated.
       
      What qualifies:
      Darn near anything!
      Reaper/non-reaper!
      Any material!
      Shelf of shame minis from ages long forgotten!
      Exchange minis!
      Speed paints!
      Armies! (Though I'd encourage perhaps something outside the army as well)
      Any Size!
      Based/unbased!
      Etc! (I think that covers everything)
       
      Year long challenge
      Pick a miniature of size large or greater to complete in the Jan-Feb Block. In Nov-December, purchase (if needed) that same mini and repaint in the same scheme to see direct side-by-side improvement or changes in your methods
       
      Jan/Feb: 8: https://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/89751-janfeb-rpchallenge/
      March/April: 9:
      May/June: 8
      July/August: 9:
      Sept/Oct: 9:
      Nov/Dec: 9:
       
       
       
    • By NomadZeke
      LE GASP! I'm on time!

      Please see the main post here for rules, questions and general chatter, while using this thread to keep a list of links to your show-offs or show-off related comments in a single post: A reminder to please adhere to miniatures posting guidelines as usual.
      https://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/89750-2020-rpchallenge-informationquestions/
      All the information you need should be here.

      Due to the revised format, there will be more than one bonus challenge available for this month. Including a "Hard mode" which Is some combination that may or may not have a source behind it.

      Your challenge is: 8!

      Bonus Challenge: The First!
      Hindsight! - OK let's be obvious, you SAW this coming. *rimshot* paint a miniature with glasses!

      Bonus Challenge: The Second!
      Our annual favorite challenge returns. February Fingerpaint! 
      Pick a miniature that is NOT terrain.
      This is pretty self explanatory. 


      Hard Mode Challenge!
      February holds "National Margarita Day" and often hand-in-hand with the tropical drink, is gaudy 'Aloha' clothing! Paint a mini if your choice where the majority of the exposed surface must be free-handed in the mannerism of such! Yes that's a lot of freehand.
      (I honestly just wanna see someone paint a slime covered in freehanded palm trees >.>)


      Good luck

      The game is made up and the points don't matter
    • By Glitterwolf
      I'm a fan of the Scale 75 paints, they have a new range called artist colors.
      The paint comes in tubes.
       
      I wonder if anyone has tried these?
      You're thoughts on these?
       

    • By NomadZeke
      Please see the main post here for rules, questions and general chatter, while using this thread to keep a list of links to your show-offs or show-off related comments in a single post: A reminder to please adhere to miniatures posting guidelines as usual.
      http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/84371-2019-rpchallenge-questionsannouncements/
      All the information you need should be here.

      As usual, the new format holds a "hard mode" challenge!

      The Last quarter of the year 2019 because real life is a bugbear sometimes.

      Your challenge is: 18!

      Bonus Challenge: 1!
      Fall! Paint a mini that has fallen over (for whatever reason) (Pompeii guy works for this too!)

      Bonus Challenge: 2!
      This is Halloween! - Paint a mini using only colors that have black, orange, and purple in the name. You may also use the paints available from this year's ghoulie bag.

      Bonus Challenge: 5!
      Festive feast - Since both US And Canada have their Thanksgiving in this time bracket - paint up a mini (figure or terrain) to have some food being presented, if you can do a drinking vessel to be painting like a full glass, even better!

      Bonus Challenge: 4!
      For-lack-of-a-better-idea- December 15th is national Cat Herders' day! Paint a tabaxi, or any other mini featuring a feline. (It's a real holiday, go ahead, look it up)

      Hard Mode Challenge 1!
      Jack-o-lantern's light - Paint a mini where the only source of light would be coming from inside a jack-o-lantern. Pumpkin may be part of the mini/base or sculpted

      Hard Mode Challenge 2!
      Under Wraps- Paint a mini so that anything that any non-flesh (armor-weapons-cloth-etc) looks like it's patterned wrapping paper. This is assuming a humanoid figure. Dragons or such apply the same challenge to the whole body.

      As always, the game is made up and the points don't matter!
  • Who's Online   11 Members, 0 Anonymous, 26 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...