Jump to content

Recommended Posts

2018-01-27-bog.jpg

 

Here's the first piece of bog terrain finished.

I originally intended to use a 5-minute epoxy and acetone mix for the water, but I can no longer find really cheap and nasty epoxy — I used to be able to get 40ml syringes for just a couple of bucks, but now the cheapest ones I could find are closer to ten. So, instead I used polyester casting resin, which costs about thirty bucks for a 250ml can.

There are down-sides to using the polyester:

  • First, it stinks to high heaven while it's curing.
  • Second, the disposable plastic cups I used for mixing are dissolved by it — I had to do a rapid transfer into another vessel before it ended up all over everything.
  • Third, it's very, very clear, which would normally be a good thing, but for this purpose it could have done with being a bit more murky. I added some colouring, but not quite enough, so the water looks more lake-ish than boggy.
  • Fourth, it's quite a bit thicker than water, so the meniscus is more pronounced, and it takes a bit of persuasion to flow into all the nooks and crannies. However, I was pretty much expecting that and I'm not heartbroken by it.


The vehicle in the picture is my 3d-printed 1/100 scale Burford-Kegresse machine-gun carrier.

  • Like 14
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 7
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

2018-02-14-riverBogTerrain.jpg

Figures are British WW1 staff officers from Peter Pig

 

This terrain piece is somewhat experimental, inasmuch as I wanted to try out using very cheap (and pretty terrible) 5-minute epoxy resin for the water effects. I wanted something to go at one end of my river pieces (here and here), so they don't necessarily have to go from edge to edge of the table. The water doesn't match those pieces though, so that may not be a goer — I'll just have to see how much the difference scrapes on my nerves when the pieces are actually in play.

The no-name epoxy I used was some I found on a clearance rack at a local hardware chain store, for about three bucks per 50ml syringe. At that price, I figured I wasn't risking much except my time if it didn't work. I mixed it along with about 5-10ml of acetone to thin it, and I added some sepia acrylic ink — far too much, as it turned out — to colour it.

The results are as you see, only partially successful. With the acetone and ink added, it took a lot longer to cure than it said on the label, but that was a good thing as it gave me more working time to nudge it into all the nooks and crannies. In very shallow areas, close up against the flocking, it has greyed out somewhat. I suspect that's because the PVA I used to seal the flock wasn't fully dry, and some of it has migrated into the epoxy. It's not a tragedy for this piece, because it just looks like muddy, swampy muck, but it would have been problematic if I'd needed clear water throughout.

Whether it was because of the additives or not I don't know, but when it cured, this epoxy developed a waxy bloom that had to be wiped off. I was a bit relieved when I found that it could be wiped off.

The epoxy has one advantage over the polyester casting resin I've used, and that is that it doesn't smell, but that's it's only advantage. It is much thicker, and really does need the addition of acetone to make it usable at all, and it creates a pronounced meniscus as it cures. It doesn't create the slight surface ripple that the polyester does, so it doesn't look as convincingly liquid.

 

One thing: it would have been better to have attached the dam across the river-mouth end so that it leaned out at a slight angle. That way, when I trimmed off the meniscus, it would leave a vertical edge, and the water surface would remain shiny and flat right up to the edge. I didn't do that, so when I trimmed the meniscus it left a scar across that edge.

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Waylandrk
      Thanks to everyone who passed on swampy/marsh basing tips. Experimented with a few and got an effect I liked. 
      My jungle Tatzlwyrm now has some suitably wet ground to lurk in.




    • By MojoBob
      I found this model somewhere on the internet, alone and uncredited, so I have no idea who made it or what it is or anything. People have suggested that it's a Kirby, whatever that is, with a human face pasted on.

      I like it, and I'll print about a dozen of them, and make up some stats to use them in my D&D campaign in some way. I'm leaning towards some kind of waddling tar-baby critter, but we shall see.

      The original model was only about 1.5mm tall, so I've rescaled it by 1500% to roughly 20mm.
    • By MojoBob
      This is a model by Duncan Louca, one of a set of three demons. The other two of the set are on the printer as I write this.

      I've printed it at 0.08mm in PLA on my Ender-3, scaled at 150% which brings it up to about 50mm tall. I added a base of my own, as the models are provided baseless.
    • By MojoBob
      Here we have yet another of Reaper's plastic Bones miniatures, from one or other of the Kickstarters. I don't know the SKU. I've mounted it on a steel washer, and extended the base texture with Green Stuff.

      He's a stout fellow, in every sense of the word, but I get the feeling he might be a bit of a bastard if you cross him.

      This guy is painted as a more or less mediaeval European mendicant friar, though the weapon is one the Japanese call tetsubo, an iron-bound club-staff. It was notoriously used by some of the militant Japanese Buddhist monkish sects for killing people without (theoretically, though probably not actually) spilling their blood. There was one sect who carried their sacred bits and pieces in a casket into battle, and threw it into the enemy lines to inspire the monks to a fanatical frenzy to get it back. They were, let's face it, completely barmy.
    • By MojoBob
      This is a three-dimensional doodle I did in Blender in the process of teaching myself how to use its Sculpt mode to create organic forms. I had no plan at all when I started out with a simple cube, and it just ended up getting creepy so I went with it.
       
      The figure is one of the Bones Townsfolk, the bartender, who I've made a bit more sinister with his bloody hands and apron.
       
      I printed the cube on my Ender 3 FDM machine at 0.2mm in PLA. Hopefully it will inspire a certain degree of disquiet among my players.
  • Who's Online   13 Members, 0 Anonymous, 28 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...