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Buglips and Guindyloo paint DHL 02017: Scorpius Rex Dracus


Guindyloo
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Guindy, I have a question about how you handled the mold slippage. The pic looks to me like it wasn't too bad. My question is if you considered using green stuff to fill the ridge from the high side to the low side. I do this sometimes with slippage because for me it can be easier or less time intensive to copy the texture with green stuff than filing down the high side of the slippage. It's sort of like gap filling. The slippage on this mini may not have been extensive enough for that approach to be practical though. Just curious about your approach.

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Doing these joint WIP threads is a genius idea; congrats and thanks to both of you for doing this!

 

@Guindyloo--special thanks for going into detail with the assembly of this particular model. You didn't cover anything I didn't know, but a lot of it I had to learn the hard way. If you doing this saves even one person from those painful lessons, then you have accomplished an awesome thing.  :winkthumbs:

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17 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

Are you going to do this only for Reaper minis?

 

Yes, only Reaper miniatures.  This is for a couple of reasons.

 

First, expanding beyond Reaper creates logistical issues because Reaper is one of the few companies we have in common.  I collect RAFM and Partha (with a smattering of Darksword), Guindy likes Kingdom Death and others, and while there are lots of good figures out there from other companies not all of them are easily gotten if one of us has it and the other doesn't.  We tend to buy Reaper regularly, so any figure we don't already have is simple to add to the cart.

 

Second, if we were going to do this as a regular thing we thought we should use the opportunity to promote some Reaper stuff, especially interesting stuff that might get lost in the vastness of the back catalog.  It's Reaper's site, after all, and if we find something cool that people want then why not send the business to our hosts?  Reaper is good about people posting figures from other companies, so by way of thanks we're going to make these exclusively Reaper products.

 

With few exceptions, we try to keep it mostly to figures that are still in production.  This is so people can get them if they like 'em.  Con Crud was an exception because he was too much fun to pass up, and when we switch roles and I have to paint fancy then we'll be using 25th Anniversary figures.  This will be maybe 10% of what we do.

 

The only other rule is no nudity, mostly because third-party linking is a pain in the butt. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Flit said:

Guindy, I have a question about how you handled the mold slippage. The pic looks to me like it wasn't too bad. My question is if you considered using green stuff to fill the ridge from the high side to the low side. I do this sometimes with slippage because for me it can be easier or less time intensive to copy the texture with green stuff than filing down the high side of the slippage. It's sort of like gap filling. The slippage on this mini may not have been extensive enough for that approach to be practical though. Just curious about your approach.

So, unfortunately I didn't properly document the issue. In the picture where I start talking about the mold slippage, I had already been carving away at the ridge for some time when I thought "ah, crap, I should've taken more pictures of this." So it was worse than it looked there and to answer your question, yes, I did consider using greenstuff for it once I realized how extensive the issue was. The reason I didn't go that direction is because, honestly, I'm not terribly comfortable with using greenstuff. I'm trying to get myself more familiar with it, but right now my skill level with it is only at a level for adequate-ish gap filling. To use it on the entire length of the figure in a way that would actually look good would take some minor and pretty rudimentary sculpting skill, but minor as it may be, it wasn't something that I felt comfortable doing. I felt far more comfortable with carving it down even though it was quite a bit more time consuming and perhaps more risky in a physical sense, but I felt that aesthetically speaking, I would have a better result with treating it like a particularly gnarly mold line.

 

Thank you for bringing that up, as certainly greenstuff would be a very good solution to the issue for people who are more comfortable or at least more adventurous with their greenstuffing.

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