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Any advice on Dremels (or similar tools)?


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4 minutes ago, Mad Jack said:

 

 Yeah, in a lot of ways a rotary tool is almost too much tool for what we as miniature hobbyists use it for - I tend to spend decent money on my stuff because I'm equally likely to be using it for home repair or plumbing as anything hobby-related.

 

If its just mini related and I really wanted a powered tool - I'd pick up a pen sized electric engraver.

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Edited by rfusca
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Since you don't intend to be doing much heavy work with it for now, I'd definitely look into either getting the flexible shaft attachment for a regular Dremel or get a smaller hobby-sized Dremel. The

The shaft attachment is a great thing to have.  That way you aren't holding onto the large unit while trying to work on a tiny figure.  Also, highest speeds on metal causes the metal to melt, not grin

Never use a Dremel on Bones for anything other than drilling holes in larger areas - engraving and cutting bits go right through the Bones material like thin air and turn it into a melted mess...

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25 minutes ago, rfusca said:

Honestly, I have Dremel brand and off brand and I'd pick up the off brand again unless I was planning on cutting heavy gauge metal on it.  If you look at like the Tacklife RTD35ACL on amazon - its cheap and comes with the shaft,router,gun handle, and everything.

 

Thanks for this, to be honest, I use "Dremel" sort of like people used to use "Xerox". I'm not particularly brand-loyal or conscious, I'm more of a "Give me what works!"

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1 minute ago, Gargs said:

 

Thanks for this, to be honest, I use "Dremel" sort of like people used to use "Xerox". I'm not particularly brand-loyal or conscious, I'm more of a "Give me what works!"

If you just pick a 'rotary tool' with decent reviews, you should be fine.  I'd only go after name brand if you plan on putting it through some heavy duty works - I used to cut custom designs into steel framed computer cases for example.

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1 minute ago, rfusca said:

If its just mini related and I really wanted a powered tool - I'd pick up a pen sized electric engraver.

 

Do you use one though? As I understand it engravers work entirely different from rotary tools– more like an air hammer back-and-forth axial motion instead of spinning around the spindle axis. I can't imagine it working too well on minis, especially anything flexible (i.e. Bones).

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2 minutes ago, djizomdjinn said:

 

Do you use one though? As I understand it engravers work entirely different from rotary tools– more like an air hammer back-and-forth axial motion instead of spinning around the spindle axis. I can't imagine it working too well on minis, especially anything flexible (i.e. Bones).

It depends on the kind you get.  Some rotate, some 'pound' like that. Just get one labeled rotate.  Its a essentially a low powered dremel.

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2 hours ago, rfusca said:

If you just pick a 'rotary tool' with decent reviews, you should be fine.  I'd only go after name brand if you plan on putting it through some heavy duty works - I used to cut custom designs into steel framed computer cases for example.

 

I see someone else did case modding. ^_^

 

I kind of miss doing that, although at the same time, it's nice most cases do not need a Dremel to have air flow through them reasonably nowadays. 

 

I also don't miss the numb hands you would get after going through a pack of reinforced cutting wheels with no break, and no gloves... 

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Someone mentioned different sized collets to hold your drill bits, cutters, grinders, etc.

 

What I got what the Dremel part that gives you a keyless chuck that you can size up and down easily by turning it.  That way you never need to change out the collet and it is very easy to change your tool of choice.  Essentially the 4486 keyless chuck attachment is what you would be looking for.

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Just got done slicing some threaded rod down to size with my Dremel, and my mind drifted back to this topic.

 

I know it's been mentioned before, but eye protection! Absolute must. It may not be as dramatic as sparks shooting off and stopping a half-inch away from your eyes, but even minor shaving and grinding tasks can launch debris everywhere.

 

Dust mask is a maybe, hearing protection I only use for extended Dremel-ing sessions because I already have it for other things and I might as well.

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What Mad Jack said.

 

The first Dremel I bought was a small rechargeable. It worked ok, but I found it to be under powered for anything besides minis (which at the time were all lead). When it stopped recharging I bought a corded Dremel MultiPro with variable speeds 5000-35000 rpm and a flex shaft. It came in a kit with Dremel, flexshaft, add several bits. Sometimes I use it for non mini stuff too. When working on minis I keep the rpm no higher than about 6K. Also, with the flex shaft it is a good idea to get the flex shaft hanger. because the motor of the Dremmel needs to be higher than the the working end of the flex shaft.

I have had good luck using engraving bits with the Dremel. I sometimes use some of the smaller ones for removing mold lines

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5 minutes ago, Flit said:

I have had good luck using engraving bits with the Dremel. I sometimes use some of the smaller ones for removing mold lines

Have you (or anyone) used a Dremel for Bones mold lines?  I'm curious about what bits work best, and if it works any better than hand tools do.  I get good results with a scalpel, hobby knife, diamond files, and plastic sanding needles, but on larger Bones models, I'm wondering if a power tool would help.

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6 hours ago, Serenity said:

Have you (or anyone) used a Dremel for Bones mold lines?  I'm curious about what bits work best, and if it works any better than hand tools do.  I get good results with a scalpel, hobby knife, diamond files, and plastic sanding needles, but on larger Bones models, I'm wondering if a power tool would help.

 

I haven't tried to use the Dremel on Bones minis. I think the Bones materiel is way too soft for a Dremel. I suspect that even a fine engraver or grinding bit would go through Bones like a hot knife through butter. Maybe one of the micro tools mentioned in another post would work, but I haven't tried them. I think a hobby knife or scalpel would work best along with sanding sticks on Bones.

Edited by Flit
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 Never use a Dremel on Bones for anything other than drilling holes in larger areas - engraving and cutting bits go right through the Bones material like thin air and turn it into a melted mess...

With a sanding drum or disc, you'd need a very, very fine grit paper and a touch like a brain surgeon. Otherwise, the Dremel may as well be a belt sander or angle grinder...

 

 

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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I can tell you, I use my fixed belt sander to debase bones minis sometimes and that that requires extremely careful touch not to just chew through way too much plastic. The dremel will chew through it *much* faster - definitely not recommended.

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