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OneBoot Experiments with SHINY Paints!


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18 hours ago, OneBoot said:

I've actually already tried two of them in my Challenge so far! 

 

Silver chrome: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/80292-oneboots-lost-all-her-marbles-dds2-in-7-days/&do=findComment&comment=1703798

 

White alchemy: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/80292-oneboots-lost-all-her-marbles-dds2-in-7-days/&do=findComment&comment=1703818

 

Both are very nice! However, the Silver Chrome is an enamel paint (as I learned the hard way), so make sure you have the appropriate cleaner to remove it from your brush (I think mineral spirits, maybe?), because water doesn't work at all! 

 

The White Alchemy gives more of a pearlescent sheen than an outright shine, it's quite lovely. :wub:

 

Huzzah!       

--OneBoot :D 

Model Master makes acrylic paints too. They may have something similar to that silver chrome in acrylic.

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Right then, now that my latest Goblin Challenge is out of the way, time to get back to having fun with shiny paints! :bday:

 

The scientific method format I used earlier will be somewhat looser this time, since this is faster to type up, and my hands are still recovering. ^_^

 

Purpose

My goal is to create a shiny armor look using Breast Cancer Awareness Pink (BCAP) as the primary color. There's several different things I can try to achieve this look, and the first I decided to try is mixing various shiny metallic paints with BCAP.

 

Procedure

These are the paints I mixed with it:

- Vallejo metal medium

- Pearl white

- Shining mithril

- Blade steel

 

And here's a picture because pictures are more fun to stare at than lengthy explanations ^_^:

EODwTV6l.jpg?1

 

Because that's a little difficult to read (I'll use black ink in the future), here's a breakdown of what's where:

-Top left: BCAP + Metal medium, ratio of 4:2, shield

-Top middle: BCAP + Pearl white, 4:1, quiver

-Top right: BCAP + Shining mithril, 4:1, belly

-Bottom left: BCAP + Blade steel, 4:1, tail

 

After mixing all of those up, I realized that none of them really looked all that shiny. So I mixed a bunch of Metal Medium with 4 drops of the BCAP in the bottom-right well to see if that would work:

hkgXo71l.jpg?1

 

(it reads BCAP + Metal medium 4:7, head) Note that 7 drops is only an estimate, since the stuff is quite thick and doesn't really form nice measurable drops. :lol:

 

While the result certainly was more shiny, this also resulted in the color starting to look washed out. This is because I've found that Metal Medium tends to act like white when mixed with other things. I figured I'd try it out anyways, because why not?

 

I pulled out a few lizard folks to use as test subjects, since I've got a TON of them. I left one as bare Bonesium, and gave the other a quick prime of Grey liner because I was curious whether having a white or black background would affect how shiny the result was (spoiler: in this case, it didn't)

 

Front of the white lizard dude; see the above list for which mixtures are in what areas:

9xj96uwl.jpg

 

Back:

TGcpuM4l.jpg

 

Front of the dark primed lizard dude:

ZGN2BYBl.jpg

 

Back:

PriZAPul.jpg

 

Observations:

While both of the Metal medium mixtures produced a very subtle shine, with the 4:7 mixture producing the clearest result, none of them really read as metallic armor. I went back and tried a 1:1 mix of all 4, with little change in the end result (I can post those results if people would like, but the camera couldn't pick it up very well at all)

 

I found the Blade steel mixture quite interesting, since not only did it produce a less saturated (more gray) mixture, but it also made it kind of...purple? It's more obvious in person than it is on the camera, but it's a nice sort of pinkish lavender color. This is why I find experimenting with mixing colors to be so much fun; I never know when something unexpected will happen! :bday:

 

Conclusion:

I don't think mixing BCAP with a metallic color will give me the result I'm looking for. So, time to move on to my next technique: drybrushing a metallic paint over the top of a BCAP basecoat!

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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Well its about time you updated this thread. What've you been doing the last week?

 

Seriously though, this is a really cool thread and I appreciate you showing off what you've learned!

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So it wasn't just me then, whew.

 

Maybe it’s just one of those pigments that overpowers everything else. Perhaps a more naturally runny color would work better. :unsure:

 

It could be the lighting, but there does appear to be a slight difference between the bare and lined models. The colors on the latter are ever so slightly deeper. Still not shiny, but possibly some useful combos.

Edited by Sophie was taken
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7 minutes ago, Sophie was taken said:

So it wasn't just me then, whew.

 

Maybe it’s just one of those pigments that overpowers everything else. Perhaps a more naturally runny color would work better. :unsure:

 

It could be the lighting, but there does appear to be a slight difference between the bare and lined models. The colors on the latter are ever so slightly deeper. Still not shiny, but possibly some useful combos.

 

My theory (and it's just a theory at this point, I'd need to do a lot more experiments to confirm) is that paints with a lot of white in them don't blend well with metallics. As I continue to try new things out, I'll find out for sure. I can confirm, though, that I've not had much trouble with any of the Reaper Clear paints, and inks generally tend to do well also. 

 

Yes, there definitely is a difference between the lined and unlined! Typically, the advice is to use metallics over a dark basecoat because that will ensure the best shine. While I definitely agree with that, I also find you can get cool effects with a more dull look, such as using silver over white. It's not very shiny, but it does have a gleaming enamel look to it. ^_^

 

A lot of times the appearance of a paint can change depending on what it's placed over, particularly when using thin layers. This is especially true with metallics, which is why I love to experiment with layering metallics over different colored basecoats. Gold will look different depending on whether you apply it over red or blue or black, it's really pretty cool! :bday: 

 

:lol: I could go on and on, but I think I'll save more explanations for another time. Don't want to run out of stuff to talk about in later experiments! ^_^

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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Doesn't white paint have more dense pigments than some of the other colors? It requires a gentle touch even before putting metallics in. I could see dense pigments + metallic mica particles not playing nicely. 

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38 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

Doesn't white paint have more dense pigments than some of the other colors? It requires a gentle touch even before putting metallics in. I could see dense pigments + metallic mica particles not playing nicely. 

 

This seems like a question for @Vaitalla, otherwise known as Anne, Reaper's Paint Goddess! Except that when I went to her profile to make sure I spelled her name correctly, it seems she hasn't been on here for nearly a year. So, I decided to hunt around and see whether she'd answered this already. Good news: she has!

 

On 7/6/2013 at 1:36 PM, Vaitalla said:

White pigment has the largest particulate size, has the highest coverage of any pigment, and is also the heaviest pigment.

 

So, that would explain why colors that have a lot of white in them seem to "eat up" the shiny metallic; the shine is being covered up by the larger particulates in the paint! ^_^

 

I also found this bit of information about why the Clears work so well:

On 6/25/2014 at 8:36 PM, Vaitalla said:

As the line grew, we got the opportunity to expand to over 200 colors and I added in the Clear Brights--9094 through 9099. These are colors containing only one pigment or one plus a dash of another. They contain no white or any other colors. Because of this, they are very brilliant and translucent, which is why they were named "Clear (red, green, blue, etc.)." These colors are IDEAL for mixing and glazing. You can also gain a lot of "pop" using these over highlights initially laid down in white, or you can shade and highlight in colors that might cover a little better and then brighten and smooth everything with a glaze of Clear X. 

 

There are other single-pigment colors in the line, great for mixing, that I have mentioned in other threads--among them, Palomino Gold (yellow ochre), Pure Black, and Pure White. 9071 Chestnut Brown is your Burnt Sienna alternative.  :;):

 

Knowledge is power! :bday:

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot
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Considering that the Metal Medium acts a bit like white and washes out the colour somewhat, would adding a bit of ink of the corresponding colour that you're working with mitigate that somewhat? (I know that there isn't any pink ink, but I'm referring to other colours. Also, since we're working with metallics, wouldn't it be better to have a black basecoat so that the shiny shows up better?

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I know I said I'd do drybrush layering next, but I couldn't resist doing a little more mixing because curiosity. ^_^

 

Top well is 5:3 Metal medium : Clear Red

Bottom well is 3:3 Metal medium : Clear Magenta

b88mFgCl.jpg

 

Pardon the messy palette, I haven't had the time or energy to clean them off yet. :blush:

 

Got some cool results from both, though neither match the color of BCAP. Right leg is the Clear red mixture, left leg is the Clear Magenta mixture:

38tns8Fl.jpg

 

kABpSGwl.jpg

 

This gave MUCH better results in the "shiny armor look" department! :bday: The Clear magenta gives the closest in terms of color to what we're looking for, but either one could work nicely for a pink armor (the Clear red mixture actually looks a LOT like Prom-night pink). There's a few more things I want to try, both to match the color better, and also to try and replicate these results using only Reaper paints. I wish they had an equivalent of the metal medium so I could recommend it!

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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20 hours ago, OneBoot said:

This gave MUCH better results in the "shiny armor look" department! :bday: The Clear magenta gives the closest in terms of color to what we're looking for, but either one could work nicely for a pink armor (the Clear red mixture actually looks a LOT like Prom-night pink). 

 

That clear Magenta looks fantastic! I'm going to use it on a paladin I was going to paint for a friend. I'm so glad you are doing this thread! It's awesome. 

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23 hours ago, Pezler the Polychromatic said:

Considering that the Metal Medium acts a bit like white and washes out the colour somewhat, would adding a bit of ink of the corresponding colour that you're working with mitigate that somewhat? (I know that there isn't any pink ink, but I'm referring to other colours.

 

I haven't tried combining regular paint, ink, and metallic paint before. Sounds like a neat thing to experiment with! :bday: *adds to list*

 

23 hours ago, Pezler the Polychromatic said:

Also, since we're working with metallics, wouldn't it be better to have a black basecoat so that the shiny shows up better?

 

Probably, but I was curious what difference that actually made, so I decided to do a side-by-side comparison with the white and black lizards. It seems to me that the dark undercoat does make it slightly more shiny; however, the white undercoat results in a brighter more colorful look. So it really depends on what look you're going for, I think.

 

I'm learning right alongside everyone else here! ^_^

 

20 hours ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

Could you maybe use a wash medium to thin the BCA pink then add a bit of the metallic medium? Maybe that would allow the flakes to show through a bit better.

 

I could certainly give it a try, though I'm not sure how big of a difference it would make. Let's find out! :D

 

15 hours ago, DragonWyrm said:

You could also glaze the metalic medium over the pink. Thats how I used my Iridescent medium.

 

That was my plan after trying a drybrush layer over the pink. Both give slightly different results, so I thought I'd showcase both! ^_^

 

2 hours ago, TheMandolin said:

That clear Magenta looks fantastic! I'm going to use it on a paladin I was going to paint for a friend. I'm so glad you are doing this thread! It's awesome. 

 

Yay, I'm so glad you're finding this thread helpful! ::D: Bear in mind that what you see in the picture is Clear Magenta mixed with Vallejo metal medium, not just the Clear Magenta by itself. If you don't have metal medium, don't worry! I will be trying a couple of Reaper metallics next to see if I can get similar or better results. ^_^

 

Huzzah!       

--OneBoot :D 

Edited by OneBoot
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