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Boaz

Foods of yester-yore

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 Got a few gifts for the gals in the office ... got me thinking about food (I let them pick the gift subject) ... thought I'd let you all have a snek peek ...1926puffedRice.thumb.jpg.cec05d19118027d98dd693f53036e7ea.jpg5ad81130d9c14_1926Libbys.thumb.jpg.62c7acaa5725d81224d4e8a3e24aa3c6.jpg

 

 and I'll throw in a few extras ...1926Nucoa.thumb.jpg.daa1ff9bd6c0f7fdd5577bb6278a2d76.jpg

Florence.thumb.jpg.80b8452ce55676dd936442038ee9a967.jpg

 

 Funny how food has hardly changed at all ... or has it ???

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 Still leaning forum option ... a guinea pig is still food right ?

 

1926Campbells.thumb.jpg.3e8b4552d7057c7abb1121cd299f7c74.jpg1926Swift.thumb.jpg.f326b1a482be53364a70d9aa3e24df61.jpg1926GoldMedalFlower.thumb.jpg.aabfba0096a31b69a9caaf15d08ff20e.jpg1926Banana.thumb.jpg.aebb2569bf83497c0f219323d21d94bd.jpg5ad8178146ea7_1026Johnstons.thumb.jpg.05f3a167243a2968bcd63fe769e049b2.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 Still need to figure out that pop up pic trick ... but a last few food related shots ...1926Gorham.thumb.jpg.20c725e71de9f54fde78d8a985bd7667.jpg1926Scott.thumb.jpg.76447ed662c082f0ba89a9131966e028.jpg

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I have a sizeable collection of vintage cookbooks and ephemera (the fragile pamphlets and booklets that got given away with small appliances or were used to promulgate recipes using the sponsor's products).

 

I'm also fond of old magazines with their extraordinary advertisements.

 

It's hard to say for certain, but most of these look to be around 1926-1927 to me.

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5 hours ago, Crowley said:

My most used cook book is from the Boston School Of Cooking, from 1915 (1917?). 

I used to have that book - it was much loved. ( The BCSCB, AKA Fannie Farmer. ::): )

 

If you want a Project Gutenberg style blast from the past - The White House Cookbook.

 

The Auld Grump

Edited by TheAuldGrump
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I have The Gay Nineties Cookbook.  Published in 1946 it is a fun little book written for having retro  19th century dinner parties, containing not only recipes but tidbits of history, celebrity gossip, and advice on everything from dressing, to menu plans, to music choices.  

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2 hours ago, TheAuldGrump said:

I used to have that book - it was much loved. ( The BCSCB, AKA Fannie Farmer. ::): )

Mmmmmm force-meats, Hamburg steaks, and generous portions of lard. And a lot of recipes that sound suspiciously like grandma’s dinners and dad’s pies.

 

We always had a (probably much more recent) copy at hand growing up. That and the Better Homes & Garden’s Cookbook and I think an old Betty Crocker one.

 

I wish I knew how grandma made her stew -_-

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 She made it with T.L.C. , like all grandma's do ...

 

 I have a 1972 saterday evening post cookbook floating around here someplace ... as well as a bunch of 70s sunsets with diferent focus ... you never know where you'll find a jem of a recipe. 

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On 4/19/2018 at 2:21 PM, TheAuldGrump said:

I used to have that book - it was much loved. ( The BCSCB, AKA Fannie Farmer. ::): )

 

If you want a Project Gutenberg style blast from the past - The White House Cookbook.

 

The Auld Grump

I have a copy of TWHC  living in the foot locker mostly full of cookbooks we've managed to accumulate.

I recommend this if you want some tried and tested traditional recipes and excellent instructions on scratch cooking.

GEM

20 hours ago, Boaz said:

 She made it with T.L.C. , like all grandma's do ...

^^^ So much this^^^

Every good cook I've ever met has this as a key ingredient/spice/seasoning for every recipe.

Without the passion it's just mediocre cafeteria food.

GEM

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My mother used to have a thin cookbook on cooking with canned lard.

 

Published by UNESCO. (I'm gonna guess that they used to distribute canned lard?)

 

The Auld Grump

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One of the gems of my collection is a 1910 Karo Syrup recipe booklet with a lovely cover illustration by one of the pre-Norman Rockwell Saturday Evening Post-type illustrators, possibly Leyendecker. It is extremely fragile and only survived because it was tucked into a 1933 General Foods cookbook.

 

A lot of the time I enjoy the old cookbooks because of how appalling their recipes are. I have a mid-1920s one where the entire chapter of salads is a disgrace.  There is not a one that is not loaded down with a heavy cream or mayonnaise dressing and most of them have really unappetizing ingredients. They're not quite as bad as the notorious old "peas, peanuts, and bananas in cream" salad, but they do seem to be "nearly any ingredient smothered in something thick and white, served on an iceberg lettuce leaf."  The leftovers of the 1920s fashions in salads remain with us in the form of tuna salad, egg salad, cheese logs (Yes. Shredded American cheese mixed with cream cheese served on a lettuce leaf was called a "salad"), and yogurt with fruit in, which seems to have been a switcheroo for an earlier version of "fruit salad" made with sour cream or whipped cream.

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9 minutes ago, Inarah said:

Pingo, let me just add one word: aspic.  

 

 

 

Ew.... ew ew ew ew ew.... EW

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2 hours ago, Crowley said:

Ew.... ew ew ew ew ew.... EW

Let me see if I can find an old recipe that I saw for chicken hearts in aspic.... (No, not joking.)

 

Heh! Found it - with a note that it became the basis for canned pet foods.... ::P: (And an article titled 'Aspic: There's A Reason No One Makes It Anymore'.)

 

The Auld Grump

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