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Rainbow Sculptor

Adventuring Alice

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@GHarris I was watching Bobby's speed sculpt on the last Reaper Live episode and you're totally right. He makes things big, chunky, and far less detailed than I would be naturally inclined to put in. I have actually been doing exactly what you suggested recently and trying to see what the 3D render is compared to what actually prints. 

 

The learning curve is frustrating often times but I'm getting better each time I pick it up and with so much support I have no doubts I'll get where I want to be with it eventually!

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Well, It was a long day but I managed to sculpt a head for Alice. The hair still needs some work but I'm pretty happy with the face. I tried a new approach to construction, working from primitives as opposed to starting with ZSpheres and then meshing them. I like the level of control but it also makes blocking things out take a little longer for me....at least for now. What do you think? Did I manage to get her attitude/expression to translate well?

Alice Head Front.JPG

Alice Head Turn.JPG

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26 minutes ago, TaleSpinner said:

Yeah you did.  I'm gobsmacked that you are functioning at this level in Zbrush after what, a week?  Wow!

 

Thanks! It's been a week of long and often frustrating days but it's also really fun and rewarding. You should come to the dark side, if you try it you may never work with that awful GS again haha

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2 hours ago, Rainbow Sculptor said:

 

 You should come to the dark side, if you try it you may never work with that awful GS again haha

 

Honestly, I've given it serious consideration, VERY serious consideration, serious enough that it is tentatively in my 5-year plan.  It is tentative because frankly, I don't really want to.  It is in the plan at all because I can see a time coming that I may have to if I want to BE a professional sculptor in this industry as time goes forward.  If I were a full time sculptor or wanted to be so, I would absolutely invest everything into this tech, but I am not, and it will be at least 8 years before I will have the capacity to even consider such a career shift.

 

Currently, sculpting for me is a passion that is also a diversion from this:

 

IMG_E4247.JPG.14bab08641cf04a39cd2134c2a5e0722.JPG

 

That is my view for 40 to 50 hours a week.  I leave that and go make little people and jewelry for the 5 to 15 hours a week I can carve out for myself.  At this point, I really do not want to put that view into my studio as well; it would sort of defeat the point of WHY I have a studio in the first place.

 

For now, at least 3 of my 4 main clients seem to still prefer greens over pixels.  If it comes to the point where I have to go digital to sell sculpts, I'll have to decide if I continue as a professional at all, or go back to painting minis and sculpt for myself alone.  That is why it is in the tentative zone, and not the hard plan.

 

Sorry for hijaccking your thread with my soapbox.  I have nothing against digital art.  If I were in your shoes, I would absolutely embrace this technology. I've spent the last 30 years creating digital art.  I'm a trained illustrator in my own right and know my way around several CAD systems.  I'm just a bit frustrated at how hard that part of my life is trying to push into the part of my life I use to escape from it.

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Thanks @TaleSpinner - you just made me realize why I have so little motivation to open up Fusion 360 and finish my vehicle projects lately. 

I now return you to your regularly scheduled thread. 

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@TaleSpinner I definitely understand. I honestly fought the transition hard at first but I was watching the industry change and being as new to sculpting as I am I figured it was better to learn now and be as useful and competitive as possible if I want to solidify a place in the professional world. I can certainly understand not wanting to stare at a computer screen 24/7.

I was concerned that without being able to feel the clay and the tools I wouldn't be able to work as intuitively as I do in clay. I tried making the transition to Photoshop many many years ago and I can certainly use that tool now but it's not my preference. I love the feel of my brushes and pencils and watching paint blend and move on the page. All that said, I am loving Zbrush.

 

I'm able to make what I could only dream of making in clay. When I came up with the concept for this piece I had a specific idea of what I wanted to make and I did okay in clay but THIS is what I really wanted to make. That's a satisfying feeling. Anyway, I know the professional/hobby question will be a difficult one to make if it comes to that and I hope it doesn't for a long time.

 

So I came back to the head today. I zoomed out until it was to scale with my physically sculpted version to see what was reading and what wasn't. Turned out you couldn't see anything in the hair. Just looked like I slapped two pieces of clay to the side of her face SO.....I exaggerated the crap out of it until it read right at scale and adjusted some things that will hopefully resolve casting issues. Did some touch up work on the facial features and added her bow/headband. Also figured out how to change the color of my clay, an obvious essential component of my process haha  Now I have access to every possible color in the spectrum at the touch of a button MUAHAHA 

I need to mess with my basic female mesh and figure out if that will work for me or if I'll need to sculpt a body especially for her due to her more childlike proportions. I'm also gonna try to learn more about retopology which is a lengthy technical process Gene walked me through the other day.

WIP head.JPG

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Looking really good, but...(I hope you find this helpful, rather than hurtful or annoying.)

The face of your computer sculpt looks far more menacing than the face of your clay sculpt

I don't know if it's the magnification, the angle, the computer shading vs real world light & materials, and/or the actual differences between the sculpts, or even something else. 

From a technical standpoint, the digital sculpt looks great, but to me it doesn't capture the essence of the your concept drawing nearly as well as your clay sculpt does. I have no idea what you can do about it, or if it even matters once it's printed out on a 3d printer. 

Edited to Add: I just realized that maybe you wanted her to be more menacing, and my criticism is irrelevant. :poke:

Edited by kristof65
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1 hour ago, kristof65 said:

Looking really good, but...(I hope you find this helpful, rather than hurtful or annoying.)

The face of your computer sculpt looks far more menacing than the face of your clay sculpt

I don't know if it's the magnification, the angle, the computer shading vs real world light & materials, and/or the actual differences between the sculpts, or even something else. 

From a technical standpoint, the digital sculpt looks great, but to me it doesn't capture the essence of the your concept drawing nearly as well as your clay sculpt does. I have no idea what you can do about it, or if it even matters once it's printed out on a 3d printer. 

Edited to Add: I just realized that maybe you wanted her to be more menacing, and my criticism is irrelevant. :poke:

 

Really great feedback, I definitely appreciate the constructive criticism. I was actually discussing that exact thing with my husband as I got closer to finished adjusting things for casting. I think you're right, her expression in the digital sculpt does seem to imply a more sinister/menacing demeanor. I made some... okay a lot...of minor changes mostly to the eyebrows, bridge of the nose, and eye socket to hopefully lessen the menacing expression. I wanted her to look confident and a bit sassy but not evil. The smile is much more indented in the digital version however I really like it and I don't think it's causing too much of an issue so unless you guys think it still looks evil I'm keeping it haha

WIP head 2.JPG

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44 minutes ago, Corsair said:

The mischievous look seems more fitting.

 

Yeah I'm not really happy with either one. I think I went passed where it should be and straight into mannequin territory. I'm gonna go back and rework it and see if I can find a happy medium.

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The redone hair is much better! You're right, the redone hair probably wouldn't have shown up. What size is she going to be when you print her?

 

I find that redoing the mouth is probably the hardest part of the face. Eyes I do fairly early on to use as a reference for the rest of the head, noses are just kinda there, eyebrows and eyelids are pretty straightforward, but mouths move all over the place! Getting the muscles/fat in the face to match the mouth while still keeping that exaggerated look is a challenge.

 

Depending on how big she will be in the end and whether they are going to be draped against the neck/shoulders/collarbones the strands of hair hanging down may be a bit too small....

 

Did you use the Orb Cracks brush on the hair?

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18 minutes ago, GHarris said:

The redone hair is much better! You're right, the redone hair probably wouldn't have shown up. What size is she going to be when you print her?

 

I find that redoing the mouth is probably the hardest part of the face. Eyes I do fairly early on to use as a reference for the rest of the head, noses are just kinda there, eyebrows and eyelids are pretty straightforward, but mouths move all over the place! Getting the muscles/fat in the face to match the mouth while still keeping that exaggerated look is a challenge.

 

Depending on how big she will be in the end and whether they are going to be draped against the neck/shoulders/collarbones the strands of hair hanging down may be a bit too small....

 

Did you use the Orb Cracks brush on the hair?

 

They should be draped over the collarbone area but they should be easy enough to make bigger if necessary. I actually didn't, I downloaded those brushes but I spent too long failing at getting them in ZBrush so I just started working and did my best to replicate it with the damstandard.

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So I spent most of yesterday figuring out how retopology works, what it does, why it's useful, and practiced about a dozen times (meaning I had to resculpt a dozen figures RAWR) but it also means that I was ready to tackle Alice's body today! So the process was the same as the standard female mesh I posted earlier. ZSphere build, mesh it, then start sculpting in the details. Once I got her anatomy down I attached the head that I made previously and started on costuming. I feel like I could've done more today but unfortunately technical problems and my giant learning curve is still taking up a bunch of my time. Still, I'm really proud of the progress I was able to make and at the speed that things are coming together. Here are a few snapshots I took along the way to share with you guys.

 

Alice Body.JPG

Boots.JPG

First Skirt Layer.JPG

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