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What are clear colors for?


thelonegoldfish
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4 minutes ago, thelonegoldfish said:

What is the intended purpose for the six clear colors (09094 - 09099)?

 

The couple times I tried them they weren't very transparent afterwards. I tried them over metallics and they completely occluded the reflection. Maybe they need more thinning, but then how are they different than other colors?

 

The name of those paints is a bit misleading. They're very high pigment density colors, often using a single pigment in the bottle. They're very good for tinting other colors, but they are not, and are not really intended to be, translucent like (for instance) the Badger Minitair Ghost Tints.

 

Mixed with acrylic medium, you can make very nice glazes. Mixed with a bit of white, you can make very nice, highly saturated colors with good opacity. Mixed with other paints, you can shift the color in interesting ways.

 

HTH

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It seems like not only are they single pigments, but the fluid they're in isn't colored - if they separate on the palette, they separate into the color, and clear/white. This is as opposed to a color like Red Brick that separates into red goop with blue liquid. Not sure what the composition differences are on types of paint here, but this is an observation.  

 

Doug is right on the uses. They're very nice for making glazes and shifting colors. Used straight and they are a bit jarring. They are super easy to thin down into glazes though and apply smoothly. 

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3 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

... the fluid they're in isn't colored ....

 

Acrylic medium is clear when it sets and kind of milky until then. If you're seeing any other colors, they're the result of pigments.

 

So when you see Red Brick separate out into two colors, you're seeing the blue pigment that is shifting the reddish base color slightly toward purple to get what the formulator is calling "red brick". Or perhaps you're seeing multiple pigments separating by density or miscibility.

 

Note that Reaper uses a limited number of pigments to produce their full line of paint. (That number, IIRC, used to be something like 10, but they've been upgrading their paint operation, so I don't know whether that's still true.) There are many more pigments than 10 used in artists' acrylic paints, but with a limited palette, mixing to the final color is pretty much necessary.

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That would make sense. At any rate, the blue pigment seems to stick with the medium and leave the red to get goopy in that one. Density, miscibility... yeah, those would be good culprits. My clears don't go multi-color when they separate like many others do. 

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