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Miniature Painting Techniques—Glossary


TaleSpinner
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Thanks for all the info!

I find it interesting that you're listing the term Blending to be interchangeable with Wet Blending. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I've only heard people refer to blending as the transition of one colour to another and then Wet Blending, Layering, Feathering, Glazing, 2 Brush Blending, etc. are different methods/techniques by which to achieve those blends. Interested to see if I'm the only one operating by that definition.

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3 minutes ago, Guindyloo said:

Thanks for all the info!

I find it interesting that you're listing the term Blending to be interchangeable with Wet Blending. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I've only heard people refer to blending as the transition of one colour to another and then Wet Blending, Layering, Feathering, Glazing, 2 Brush Blending, etc. are different methods/techniques by which to achieve those blends. Interested to see if I'm the only one operating by that definition.

 

I’m pretty sure that Rhonda uses your definition.

 

I learned it as two or more paints actually blending together.  I’m old though, so...

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20 minutes ago, Guindyloo said:

Thanks for all the info!

I find it interesting that you're listing the term Blending to be interchangeable with Wet Blending. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I've only heard people refer to blending as the transition of one colour to another and then Wet Blending, Layering, Feathering, Glazing, 2 Brush Blending, etc. are different methods/techniques by which to achieve those blends. Interested to see if I'm the only one operating by that definition.

 

This was my understanding too. However, wet blending might be the most literal interpretation: it is the only one in which the paints are mixed on the surface (to my knowledge). The others do things to a single paint on the surface. "Blended" might be a better term for what we are thinking of, and achievable in different methods. The "blend" part of it would refer to the effect, instead of the method in that case. Arguably, glazing is a type of layering, and feathering is a way of smoothing layers. Standardization is hard, but I still think it may be worth instructors time to work together on picking some community terminology for classes. 

 

Thank you for the guide @TaleSpinner; having a term compendium is very handy, and is a useful guide for checking skills off a list of things to learn. 

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29 minutes ago, Guindyloo said:

I find it interesting that you're listing the term Blending to be interchangeable with Wet Blending. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I've only heard people refer to blending as the transition of one colour to another and then Wet Blending, Layering, Feathering, Glazing, 2 Brush Blending, etc. are different methods/techniques by which to achieve those blends. Interested to see if I'm the only one operating by that definition.

 

You aren't the only one. I view Blending as "establishing a gradient" regardless of technique employed. I consider Layering/Feather/Glazing as all blending techniques;, but I consider them "dry" techniques compared to "wet" blending. I.e. it requires the previous layers to be dry during application of the next, whereas all forms of wet-blending methods (to my knowledge) operate with wet paint interacting with each other.

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1 hour ago, hungerfan said:

So if I don't have flow improver do I just use more water to make the glaze?

 

If using MSPs, yes, they have enough in them to make them behave without the flow improver.  I have also read that some people like sealer in place of the flow improver.

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11 hours ago, TaleSpinner said:

 

If using MSPs, yes, they have enough in them to make them behave without the flow improver.  I have also read that some people like sealer in place of the flow improver.

 

I would ask the same question regarding using MSP Wash Medium.  If I put a drop of flow improver, sealer, and wash medium side by side, the wash medium looks like a mix of flow improver and sealer.

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That's awesome, Andy!

One thing for everyone to remember when thinning paint is that even in one line of paint (say RMS, vallejo, golden, craft paint, etc) each individual color will behave differently.  They all have different base pigments, opacifiers, varying consistency, etc.  This makes the "use x amount of x" frustrating to painters, because they may see differing results.  I remember getting so excited when Anne put out umber brown, since it's my favorite goto in acrylic for certain effects and color schemes.  But, the RMS version is highly transparent, making it less suitable for basecoating, and more for glazing.  Likewise, the clear colors from Reaper are very transparent, making them fantastic for glazing and finishing touches, but if you try to use them for coverage, you'll be disappointed. They also for the same reason, do not require as much thinning as other paints in the line to achieve a good glaze.

 

What I am getting at is the need to experiment when using new colors. Play with them on paper. See how they thin, see how far they extend in a wash on something like watercolor paper.  This will teach you a lot about the paint itself and you'll start to get a feel for how much water to use.  I live in a humid area, so I tend not to thin my paints as much. sometimes I thin them on the mini itself because it takes awhile for them to dry.  Certain ways we paint evolve from out environment and comfort level.  There isn't one right way to blend or paint, and you'll learn more from experimentation then you might expect!

 

Be aware some terms in mini painting differ in the "art world" and especially if you follow the Historical miniatures side of things, fine art world, or the Europeans, they may use terms completely differently.

 

For example:

in watercolor, a wash means just putting down paint for the most part, as water color relies on transparency.

filter from the historical side of things means applying a glaze.

tint in acrylic means adding white, but in watercolor means adding water (since the paper is usually white...)

And color theory varies a whole lot depending on who you talk to.  We use a completely different system than printmakers/computer graphic design folks and than lighting/electricians as well! 

shade can mean "a certain hue (meaning the color we see like ultramarine blue)" or adding black to change the value, or creating a gradient from light to dark... confusing, eh?

 

English is a tough language to start with, never mind blending fields together!

 

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