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Opinions on a Kodak Easyshare DX6490


styates
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Has anybody used one of these? I am looking into getting one and this camera seems to have the features I want for a fairly decent price. I was wondering how it does for photographing mini's, as well as general photos. Any input will be greatly appreciated.

 

Thank you,

Stefan

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I use the Kodak Easyshare DX 4330 since I started. It's a pretty decent camera, and I like the images I'm getting.

 

However, I'm going to have to go to a bigger professional camera here in a little bit.

 

But for general picture taking, I like my Kodak Easyshare camera.

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How's the software? Is it fairly easy to get the hang of using?

The Kodak Easyshare software is pretty easy to use. I just plug the cable into the computer, turn the camera on, a window pops up, I create a file name (you don't have to do that) and it transfers them into the file and removes them from the camera (another setting you can play with).

 

Overall, it's straight-forward software to use.

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I can't say one way or another about the Kodak. The key to any digital camera is optics, optics and more optics. The better the glass the better the picture whether you are shooting on film or going digital. The key feature for digital cameras is the optical zoom not the digital zoom, especially for photographing miniatures, and it must be macro capable.

 

So look at all the cameras in your price range and compare the optical zooms first. Manufacturers with the best optics are Nikon, Canon and Olympus and Fuji is moving up as well.

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Sounds like that one is on the right track. I haven't seen anything that offers much better than 10x Optical but I haven't looked either. Then the major difference will be in the quality of the glass (and I don't know how Kodak rates for glass) and what features it comes with compared to other similiar cameras for the same money.

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I have a Kodak Easy Share DX6340. It only has a 4x optical zoom, but I have the +7 and +10 diopters, so I can get some very nice detail shots. I am ambivalent about the software, but that might be since I haven't really done much with it yet.

 

For photographing minis - make sure you get a tripod. When you are doing close-ups, any minor movement will cause blurring. A small tripod shouldn't add more than another $10 or so, a pittance compared to the cost of the camera, batteries, extra memory, etc.

 

Oh yeah - rechargable batteries are a big plus, too.

 

Corrected to fix typo caused by dyslexic fingers

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I use a 6440, although I don't use the kodak software. I have a copy of PSP8.0, and Adobe....so, I use one or the other of these. I just browse to the camera and download. I find the EasyShare software cumbersome and useless except to preview pics---and even then I can preview from my desktop without the software. I think it provides the "one touch" feature...but I never really liked that feature anyway, since the pictures I have on my camera tend to go into several different folders as I organize them.

 

The megapixel count is not much of a concern anymore....anywhere in the 3-4 range is plenty for minis. Unless you are gonna be printing poster sized pictures, that is.

 

Heisler is right about the optics. The 6440 I have has a 4x optical, which is plenty for what I do. The digital zoom is ABSOLUTELY WORTHLESS for mini pictures. I assume on larger, less detailed items it would probably do just fine.

 

A tripod is a must have, especially when dealing with the small stuff. The motion that simply pressing the shutter button causes can blur the image. You can use a desktop to brace the camera, but the fact is you must brace it somehow.

 

 

IMHO, just about any digital you get would do the trick, provided it has an "decent" optical zoom, and to a lesser degree, a macro feature. Some folks talk about the ability to manually set stuff and that sort of thing. The biggest factor I've found after optics/tripod is using proper lighting. To get a good picture, you must have enough light. The autolevel features in the softwares don't provide a good substitute for this, but they work if you don't have the light. Some folks would disagree, but I use at least three lights w/ 150watt bulbs, diffused through vellum to take my pictures, and I'm considering using one more light in the near future.

 

So...optics, tripod, good lighting. That'll take a good picture. It may not be a "pro" picture, but it will be definately presentable.

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