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paintybeard

Unreadable fiction

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1 minute ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

 

Shakespeare did not write his plays as literature, he wrote them as PLAYS, with full knowledge of where they would be performed, and by whom. Every class I've ever taken that manhandled Shakespeare, the make or break point involved the teacher knowing this, and using it to the class's advantage.

 

My instructor let my group film ourselves doing a scene from Henry IV as a cowgirl western for our final project. It was a blast. 

 

I can't deal with most classic literature. The themes and style just don't interest me. Exceptions have been Watership Down and Animal Farm, which both somehow have animals in common for getting the messages across. 

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On 12/30/2018 at 10:40 AM, TheAuldGrump said:

The Fountainhead, and, worse, Atlas Shrugged  (Ayn Rand) - "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."

 

Best description of Ayn Rand’s books I’ve ever heard. I made it through The Fountainhead, but ugh, what garbage. 

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18 hours ago, paintybeard said:

I think taking literature as a subject at school can kill your enjoyment of almost any author. I had to "do" Thomas Hardy for a solid year. Having "appreciations" of his work stuffed down my throat week after week has ensured that I will never pick up any of his books ever again. Probably my loss.

I guess that I was very lucky, then.

 

I found that it helped me learn the questions I should ask while reading.

 

I also learned what type of books irritate me to no end. (Yes, Mr. Joyce, I am looking at Ulysses while I say that.)

 

Allegory is fine when it serves a purpose, not so much when it is the purpose.

 

I enjoyed Paradise Lost - but wanted to thump a Bunyan when I read Pilgrim's Progress.

 

Then again, I read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings in a single sitting when I was twelve.... (Sadly, this was in preparation for the Silmarilion.... Which was by no means Tolkien's best.)

 

Currently, I am rereading The Hunchback of Notre Dame... much as I like to rant about how Disney pretty much missed the whole point of the book... I gotta admit that the ending is pretty danged bleak.

 

The Auld Grump

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On 12/30/2018 at 1:31 AM, Cyradis said:

Anne McCaffrey and Mercedes Lackey. I couldn't get interested in McCaffrey's style or characters, and Lackey wrote about frilly dresses and disappointment. 

 

Tad Williams. He can't even write half a female character. If they exist, they may as well be a talking box.

Anne McCaffrey (at least her Pern books) was one of my favorites for many years growing up, but I agree with the other two..

 

Here's my most unreadable fiction. 

649656004_Screenshot_20181231-184755_AmazonShopping.thumb.jpg.c47f5c5775fa46b6410c31e8f63dd219.jpg

 

Now, you might argue that it looks like a textbook and not fiction, but having taken the course,I can assure you it really is fiction!!

2 hours ago, TheAuldGrump said:

Then again, I read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings in a single sitting when I was twelve.... (Sadly, this was in preparation for the Silmarilion.... Which was by no means Tolkien's best.)

The Hobbit was my introduction to fantasy - an oversized illustrated copy that I doing while trying to decide what Hardy Boys or Nancy Drew to re-read.. I think I was 10.. 

Didn't read LoTR until a few years later and discovered The Silmarillion in high school.

 

The Silmarillion was his life's work , the problem was that he ran out of time and the published version was an semi-successful editing attempt by his son Christopher, who was crippled by the sheer volume of material his father hadn't finalized - the recently published 'Beren and Luthien' shows just how much flux there still was in his notes..

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I rather liked Anne McCaffrey's Pern books when I was younger, but find them to be a bit naive as an adult.

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Part way through middle school we had a new reading program where you could pick a book off the list, read it, do a test, then get points for questions you got right. The points were based on the length of the book, and you had to get a certain amount of points per quarter. I don't remember what the reading program before this was so it probably wasn't that great. I had been asked my parents for books to read and they had given me stuff they had read like The Firm, Pelicans Brief, Jurassic Park, etc, so I wasn't interested in most of the books on this new reading program.

 

What I would do was pick the books with the most points so I could get that quarter done in one book so I could then continue reading the novels my parents gave me. This usually worked out pretty well, even with Little Women and even after finding out Little Women was not the small abridged version my sister had. No the book that I couldn't finish over the entire quarter and had to ask my Mom for a synopsis on the ending in case there were questions about it was Gone With the Wind.

 

Stupid prideful people ruining their lives for stupid prideful reasons just annoys me to no end. Makes me wonder how I made it through Wuthering Heights as it is basically the same thing.

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6 hours ago, Cyradis said:

 

I can't deal with most classic literature. The themes and style just don't interest me. Exceptions have been Watership Down and Animal Farm, which both somehow have animals in common for getting the messages across. 

 

Watership Down is "classic literature"? Now I feel old...

Edited by paintybeard

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4 hours ago, Humansquish said:

Stupid prideful people ruining their lives for stupid prideful reasons just annoys me to no end. Makes me wonder how I made it through Wuthering Heights as it is basically the same thing.

Well, Wuthering Heights was shorter at least. But yes, for being held up as a paragon of romantic relationships, it was flipping awful. Though, it does nicely embody the idea of romance as a tragic crapshow that no one survives.

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So one type of literature that I cannot get through at all is poetry.  For some reason I just really hate it.  Not sure if I can blame the Norwegian school system for that, or if there is some defect in my brain.  But put music with it and make it a song and I am perfectly fine with it, go figure.

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43 minutes ago, Citrine said:

So one type of literature that I cannot get through at all is poetry.  For some reason I just really hate it.  Not sure if I can blame the Norwegian school system for that, or if there is some defect in my brain.  But put music with it and make it a song and I am perfectly fine with it, go figure.

Same though. I find that poetry works better for me when read aloud. Preferably by someone else. With a good voice. 

 

Gotta have Morgan Freeman sit around read that stuff. :winkthumbs:

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2 hours ago, redambrosia said:

Same though. I find that poetry works better for me when read aloud. Preferably by someone else. With a good voice. 

 

Gotta have Morgan Freeman sit around read that stuff. :winkthumbs:

Samuel L. Jackson does a nice job of narration as well.

 

Megan and I pretend that the audio for Go The F**k To Sleep is for Brigid, but....

 

The Auld Grump

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8 hours ago, Citrine said:

So one type of literature that I cannot get through at all is poetry.  For some reason I just really hate it.  Not sure if I can blame the Norwegian school system for that, or if there is some defect in my brain.  But put music with it and make it a song and I am perfectly fine with it, go figure.

 

Yes...   

 

I never understood he 'analyze poetry' stuff they forced upon us, either.    

 

Here's a good one...   

 

Quote

Kulturuke
ulturkuke
tulkuruke
ultkuruke
ukturulke
tlukuruke
ukturkule
urtukulke
turlukuke
kulrukute
ultrukuke
kuleturuk
ruletukuk
tulekukur
luretukuk
kukuterul
ruktukule
lurekuktu
luekuktur
kutlukure
rukletuku
tuklekuru
urukekult
kuruketul

 

Basically, it's a list of anagrams of the first word. 

Some of those daft teachers can actually find a meaning behind the nonsense. 

(All but the first word is nonsense, and since the first word means 'Culture week' there's not much meaning in it, either... )

 

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6 hours ago, TheAuldGrump said:

Samuel L. Jackson does a nice job of narration as well.

 

Megan and I pretend that the audio for Go The F**k To Sleep is for Brigid, but....

 

The Auld Grump

If Mr. Jackson read poetry he'd have to end every verse with "mutherfluffer" :lol:

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On 1/1/2019 at 6:52 PM, redambrosia said:

Same though. I find that poetry works better for me when read aloud. Preferably by someone else. With a good voice. 

 

Gotta have Morgan Freeman sit around read that stuff. :winkthumbs:

 

On 1/1/2019 at 9:52 PM, TheAuldGrump said:

Samuel L. Jackson does a nice job of narration as well.

 

Megan and I pretend that the audio for Go The F**k To Sleep is for Brigid, but....

 

The Auld Grump

 

Leonard Nimoy had one of those voices like Morgan Freeman's, where you can just listen to them say whatever and it feels soothing. And, surprising no one, Mr. Nimoy did more than a few poetry readings.

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