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Painting solutions for health difficulties


ManvsMini
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What a fabulous solution!  I'll have to settle for Golden Retriever peanut butter removal though.  My guess is that will work as well as a Labrador.  I can see doing this for larger figures very easily as I like the holders I already use for human sized or smaller figures.  But something (like that nice owl bear that arrived today) would work really well here.  As well as cat proof it (the Golden never seems to knock things off if they are above tail height).

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2 hours ago, Harrek said:

I'll have to settle for Golden Retriever peanut butter removal though.  My guess is that will work as well as a Labrador.

 

Currently, I have no evidence to disprove this. Please report your findings. For science, of course.

 

Yes, I never envisioned it being a replacement for everyone; preferences varying so much. It was designed with a specific purpose, and for me it worked. I am glad to hear that several people may have a use for it though!

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I have to admit, I really like the concept, especially the dust and cat protection part!  There have been a few occasions where we painted at a friends and it's also brilliant for transport.  Might have to see if I can come up with something similar.  

 

Is there any chance you can share a picture of your lovable peanut butter removal assistant?  For Science, of course.  ::D:

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As mentioned earlier, here are some pics of the way I hold my creation when painting.

 

The way I usually hold it: a few fingers underneath supporting, and a few wrapped around. Thumb not needed, and no squeezing.

 

pana0a.jpg.28093bca50a39532b40cad27874eef2d.jpg

 

It's surprisingly light, since it doesn't need weight as an anchor to prevent being knocked over when I set it down.

 

This is how I usually have my brush hand resting on the lid portion. I can steady my hand with the palm on the lid (that "meaty" part of the palm), and by resting some fingers on the pedestal.

 

grip-1a.thumb.jpg.781d62645419c8cd199807e7ec7e336e.jpg

 

It's even comfortable upside-down.

 

upsidedown0a.jpg.78e58bec77619d8edff32afd26049324.jpg

 

 

3 hours ago, LittleBluberry said:

Is there any chance you can share a picture of your lovable peanut butter removal assistant?  For Science, of course.  ::D:

 

Since it's for science, of course! Though she prefers her title as "specialist" instead of "assistant."

 

pb-removal-specialist.jpg.e6dcea0d0ec1926435ad6d76f97fa3f5.jpg

 

-MvM

Edited by ManvsMini
Grammer.
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I'm glad you assessed your difficulty and then worked to come up with such a clever way to address it!

 

In case this is useful to anyone else - I used a similar jar method to transport a fragile miniature to a painting competition before I had a fancy carrying case.

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In opening, you said you used hot glue to hold the minis in place [which is a neat idea]. All you have shown are metal minis, have you used this on plastic ones or ones with plastic bases? If so, did the hot glue cause any problems?

 

And give that pup a good belly rub too!

Edited by Corsair
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What if I told you... that the mini in those photos... was plastic? *queue the Matrix soundtrack*

 

That is a Bones mini pictured. It's superglued to a plastic base, and then I put a dab of hotglue on the underside of the base and place it onto the holder (or put the hotglue on the holder, then set the mini on the hotglue, your choice). You have to work a little quick, so the hotglue doesn't set before you get it in place, but no quicker than you would have to in any project using hotglue.

 

I have used this with both metal and plastic minis, and I have not had a problem with anything falling off or not being secure, even when flipped upside-down. Just remember, the amount of hotglue you need to use scales with the size and weight of the mini. The amount is not a big difference for people-sized minis on a 25-30mm base, but you'd likely need a larger dab of hotglue for something on a 50mm base or larger.

 

The hotglue has never damaged the plastic base on me, though I am careful not to touch the hot tip of the gun to the plastic for longer than a second. YMMV. If you don't want to use hotglue, you can always try your favorite brand of blu-tac/poster-putty, or double-sided tape/poster-mounting squares. I'm confident they'll work, I just don't use them these days.

 

A few more points about using hotglue to affix them:

  • I've never put hotglue directly onto the integral base of a Bones mini. No idea if it will cause any damage. If you have concerns, try one of the other mounting materials just above.
  • I avoid pressing the mini down so that the base and the pedestal are flush/touching. I leave a slight gap between them, just enough of a gap so I can get a dull knife (safety!) under the base, and pry/pop the mini off when painting is done. This means I use enough hotglue so the mini is "levitating" ever so slightly above the dowel rod portion (reading that, it sounds complicated, but I swear it makes more sense if you see it).
  • Even if you don't leave the above mentioned gap and the mini sits flush, no worries. The hotglue doesn't resist torsion/twisting very well, so you can twist the mini's base to break the bond. This is harder for my hands, which is why I leave the slight gap now.
  • The hotglue comes off very cleanly, I have no residue / extremely minimal residue left on either surface. Any residue can usually be scraped off or pulled off with tweezers. It cleans up well.

 

That's a lot of words, sorry to go on and on. Ask for clarification on anything if it's not clear. I can even take some pics of the next mini I affix to a holder and post them.

 

-MvM

Edited by ManvsMini
Grammer. And formatting.
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2 hours ago, Wren said:

I'm glad you assessed your difficulty and then worked to come up with such a clever way to address it!

 

In case this is useful to anyone else - I used a similar jar method to transport a fragile miniature to a painting competition before I had a fancy carrying case. 

 

Thanks! Again, I must share credit for the protection aspect with Tom Mason; seeing his video with the pickle jar to protect his sculptures inspired me. The jars have nearly put Large Marge into retirement (that's the makeup brush I use to clean dust off my models... come on, you don't name your brushes?).

 

 

1 hour ago, Corsair said:

And give that pup a good belly rub too!

 

Will do! That's a non-negotiable clause in her contract.

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Just an update for those who were curious on hotgluing their mini to whatever they use as a handle. I mentioned not setting the mini's base flush to your pedestal, so here are a few pics. I leave a gap just big enough for whatever I am going to use to pry it off with. Just hold the mini's weight up while the hotglue cools down; once it cools, the hotglue will bear the weight.

 

removal4a.thumb.jpg.353308afcb2a9c5dcbb3ed50946bebe4.jpg

 

I'm using a butter knife there; it's not serrated, it's extremely dull, and literally only cuts butter, not skin. Don't remember where I got it. It's what I use to pop the mini off when I'm done painting. Just slide it into the gap, apply leverage, and done.

 

One thing to note, lighter minis can sometimes go flying, so I do this over a spare bit of foam, to cushion any impact. Also good for metal minis; they don't fly, but this way they won't impact and chip the paint.

 

removal3a.jpg.b264061426d95bf1b191472079fa3e6b.jpg

 

I always use both hands when doing this; couldn't have shown that and taken the picture at the same time... I also hold the mini horizontal to the foam, so that when it falls, it moves straight to the foam, instead of flying high and then falling.

 

Hope this helps :)

 

-MvM

 

 

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My next device to share is for anyone who may use paint-pots or washes that come in pots. Again, I engineered it to solve my own issues, but I think it's valid for anyone who would want to use it.

 

I, like many others I presume, have some paints and washes in pots. I don't often paint straight out of them, but with the issues I've developed, the concern over knocking them over and spilling them if they were open was something that needed to be addressed.

 

Across the internet I've seen many people simply use blue-tac or poster putty on the bottom of the pot and stick it to the table, no fuss anymore. And that's great if it works for them, but it didn't for me. I saw a few people simply glue their paint-pot to a large base; my only issue with that is that now you are stuck with having a base attached it, and that takes up a significant amount of space when you have several pots that you want to do this to.

 

I wanted something with a wide base to avoid spilling that I could use on more than one pot. To that end, I proceeded to do the following:

 

I got a 1" inch PVC coupling and took a lid from an old jar (in my case, it came from an empty facewash container). I sawed the PVC coupling in half (already pictured below):

paintpotholder1a.jpg.203edfecd7777f513532de7d6c2aeba1.jpg

 

I only needed the lid, but I saved the jar portion for a later use, along with the other half of the PVC coupling. At that point, I traced on the lid where I wanted the coupling, roughed both surfaces up with some sandpaper, and glued the cut PVC to the inside of the lid.

 

paintpotholder7a.thumb.jpg.1552e8f4b57cee3b5b012eec6c46d1f2.jpg

 

I used hotglue, simply because I didn't think that connection was going to be under a lot of stress; normally I would use something like JB Weld, but I didn't want to wait a day for it to cure. In the past few months, I haven't noticed any problems with the hotglue.

 

It doesn't look like much, so what did I achieve? I now have a single non-tip-able holder that I can use for all of my paint pots. I can use one, then rotate to another when needed. It works for all of my paint pots, short and tall alike. And since I only need the one, it's easy to store.

 

paintpotholder8a.thumb.jpg.883444fa76d33b3320767010d8b600b4.jpg

 

With it, I haven't knocked over any paints lately. The lid I chose to use, with it's high lip, also provides a modicum of containment if I were to spill some or drop the paint with it's lid open.

 

Why did I choose the 1" PVC coupling? Because the inside diameter fit the size of my widest paint pot, while still being snug enough for my thinnest one. And I only needed a small amount of it, there was no need for me to buy several feet-worth of tubing. That one coupler cost me $0.57 (plus tax) at my local hardware store, and I only used half of it.

 

It's not going to revolutionize painting by any means, but maybe it can help someone worried about knocking it over. At the very least, I'm not spilling and buying fresh paint pots all the time.

 

-MvM

 

*A note on buying PVC tubes for those unfamiliar with it:

1) PVC tubing is named and sold based on the inside diameter, which doesn't account for the thickness of the tubing wall. So buying 1-inch PVC tubing means that the inner-diameter is approximately 1-inch, even though the diameter of the entire tube is greater than that (because of the wall thickness).

2) The inside diameter of a 1-inch PVC coupling is not 1-inch; it's larger, actually the diameter of the entire 1-inch PVC tube, because the coupling fits over the tube like a sleeve (thus coupling two piece of tubing/piping together). This is why I needed to use the coupling instead of the tubing. The coupling had a larger diameter that fit my largest paint-pot, the tubing would have been too small.

3) Instead of the 1-inch coupling, I could have used a larger size of PVC tubing, maybe 1.25 or 1.5 inch in diameter. But as I needed so little material, it would have been a waste.

4) Any time I say the word tubing in this post, the word pipe or piping is interchangeable.

Edited by ManvsMini
Typos, grammer.
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Many thanks for this.  My brother has developed a pretty strong tremor in his hands and can only steady them if he holds them together, but gripping the more traditional holders tired him very quickly, leading him to more or less drop his painting hobby.  Will be sharing this with him (after I cobble one or 2 up for him of different sizes) and hopefully get him back into painting.  :winkthumbs:

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I hope it helps him! If you have any questions or issues, ask away, I'm glad to help.

 

You may have to experiment on the length of the pedestal portion to find what is comfortable for his hands. I've tried from between 1.5 to 2.5 inches, and found that 1.75 to 2 works best for me. 2.5 felt too tall, it felt like I was reaching up to get at the mini with the brush. 1.5 was too short, not enough height for me to cup my fingers.

 

*Side note, the size of my hand is reflected by my height (6'4"). Not monstrous, but definitely worth noting when looking at the dimensions I used.

Edited by ManvsMini
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