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What buildings are in your village?


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I've been wanting to add more buildings to the collection. I've got a few things but I was wondering what other people feel are the must haves for a medieval/fantasy village? Pics or links to example would be helpful. At the moment I have:

church

tavern

2 houses/cottages

a few small sheds

I will be making a smithy sometime soon and more houses is a must

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MDF church never built, will probably sell.

MDF warehouse, same

6 ruined 4x4 buildings

1 paper cottage (7tv) modeled after evil dead cabin

Battle systems for modern/suburban

Temple

1 hedge maze

1 fountain

3d print files for abbey/stables/walls/ruined tower

Paper craft files for larger buildings I forget exactly

Trollskull manor half built (aka inn)

Lots of ruined walls.

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Depending on the size of village you imagine, might I suggest the following?

1) some form of constabulary, or small guard post (if its on the verge of becoming a town, most def)

2) stables, if not for horses at least for the oxen that many village farmers would share for tilling and plowing

3) if you envision your village near a river or body of water, a dock for fishing boats

4) possibly a mill on the outskirts, either wind- or water-powered

 

The bigger your village becomes, the more specialized buildings you'll find i.e. tanners, brewers, guild halls, etc. I have been reading a bunch of historical fiction books this past year...

 

-MvM

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Thanks everyone. Getting some ideas for the next buildings to make. I do have a bunch of Fat Dragon Games files for paper buildings but I've been leaning towards making them out of foam. Forgot to mention the cemetery. It's got 2 mausoleums so is about 1/4 of the town! I have a bit of ruins but am working on more. I have enough buildings and terrain for large scale battles but find I need a lot more for skirmish games even though the batlefield is only 1/4 the size. Right now it takes 3/4 of what I have finished to make a decent 3'x3' table. 

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Typical medieval village would be mostly croft and toft homes (small house with a yard for livestock and a vegetable garden out back), a church and associated church yard, a mill and a smithy. The local drinking spot might be an inn or the home of a older woman or couple that brews their own ale (hence the term "public" house or "pub".) Some villages included the manor house owned by the lord of the manor. He and his family may or may not live there, but it is where most of the official business of the village takes place.

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Multi-purpose helps a lot for RPGs.  For my first foam-core fantasy village project, I ended up making buildings that mostly consisted of floor tiles for interior action, but some representative "facades" for the street front (just to set the scene), and with various signs that could be plugged in.  (It was a lot of fun to design different tavern and shop signs, finding use for various tiny bits to attach to them -- often pieces from "Epic" scale games, or things like Mighty Empires, so a tiny dragon or dragon head might become a decorative piece for the "Red Dragon Inn" or whatnot.)

 

I usually don't try to map out an entire village in detail.  I wouldn't know where to store it all.  But the most important features that might become relevant in a fight (or when the PCs are paranoid about the potential for one) would include:

 

1) Guard tower/gate.


2) Tavern/inn and accompanying stables (for the horses, and for the occasional oddball "monster-type" or "smart-animal" adventurer who insists upon -- or is required to -- sleep outside the inn).  Depending upon the design, the "tavern" might do dual-purpose as a small "manor."


3) Church/shrine, with nearby graveyard (of varying size, depending upon adventure needs).  I also have a bunch of "catacomb" tiles for unrealistically large underground mausoleum/catacomb complexes.


4) Castle throne room (or other large grand hall that can be put to varied purposes) -- basically just a big floor tile with a fancy pattern, a place for me to put a throne or pair of thrones at one end, a "stained glass window" or "tapestry" facade (on the GM's side) so the pretty side is facing the players and looks neat, and some columns that can be arranged along the way, with some doors branching off to the front and sides.  Most of the rest of a castle interior I can represent with generic floor tiles, but it's occasionally nice to have a "showcase" piece, and it gives an excuse to have iconography that anchors it into the particular setting.


5) Town square / bazaar / market (various stalls, wagons, a well, lots of crates and other things to be knocked over, animals to be set loose, potential for lots of collateral damage and mayhem if a fight or chase commences).  I used to have a really nice Grendel set for that, but now I've resorted to just piles of crates, using beads to represent things like rolled carpets or assorted produce, with papercraft awnings.


6) Executioner square (usually for those adventures where the PCs have to *stop* an execution).


7) Blacksmith shop ... not because it's particularly important to fight scenes or chases, but it's one of those sorts of shops that has a good excuse for being open to the air, and making good use of various spare weapons, tools, armor pieces, and other props (as well as an anvil) out where they can be seen, to make for a nice set-piece.


8) An alley.  For simplicity, I typically just represent this with a couple of "field-wall" barricades (rather than two complete multi-story BUILDINGS that the players have to peek and reach between for the minis), and some smattering of obstacles -- stacked crates, piles of refuse, perhaps a broken cart.  Perfect for obligatory thug ambushes when someone instinctively rushes after the sound of someone apparently crying for help.

 

9) Sewer.  Okay, so that's more for a CITY than a village, but it comes up now and again, when some Rats of Unusual Size need to be killed for a few silvers by beginning adventurers.

 

10) Pier/docks, with waterborne conveyance, or abstraction thereof.  (I've run quite a few pirate-themed games in various systems, so this tends to get more use at my house than it probably does on the typical table.)

 

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9 hours ago, Jordan Peacock said:

Multi-purpose helps a lot for RPGs.  For my first foam-core fantasy village project, I ended up making buildings that mostly consisted of floor tiles for interior action, but some representative "facades" for the street front (just to set the scene), and with various signs that could be plugged in.  (It was a lot of fun to design different tavern and shop signs, finding use for various tiny bits to attach to them -- often pieces from "Epic" scale games, or things like Mighty Empires, so a tiny dragon or dragon head might become a decorative piece for the "Red Dragon Inn" or whatnot.)

 

I usually don't try to map out an entire village in detail.  I wouldn't know where to store it all.  But the most important features that might become relevant in a fight (or when the PCs are paranoid about the potential for one) would include:

 

1) Guard tower/gate.


2) Tavern/inn and accompanying stables (for the horses, and for the occasional oddball "monster-type" or "smart-animal" adventurer who insists upon -- or is required to -- sleep outside the inn).  Depending upon the design, the "tavern" might do dual-purpose as a small "manor."


3) Church/shrine, with nearby graveyard (of varying size, depending upon adventure needs).  I also have a bunch of "catacomb" tiles for unrealistically large underground mausoleum/catacomb complexes.


4) Castle throne room (or other large grand hall that can be put to varied purposes) -- basically just a big floor tile with a fancy pattern, a place for me to put a throne or pair of thrones at one end, a "stained glass window" or "tapestry" facade (on the GM's side) so the pretty side is facing the players and looks neat, and some columns that can be arranged along the way, with some doors branching off to the front and sides.  Most of the rest of a castle interior I can represent with generic floor tiles, but it's occasionally nice to have a "showcase" piece, and it gives an excuse to have iconography that anchors it into the particular setting.


5) Town square / bazaar / market (various stalls, wagons, a well, lots of crates and other things to be knocked over, animals to be set loose, potential for lots of collateral damage and mayhem if a fight or chase commences).  I used to have a really nice Grendel set for that, but now I've resorted to just piles of crates, using beads to represent things like rolled carpets or assorted produce, with papercraft awnings.


6) Executioner square (usually for those adventures where the PCs have to *stop* an execution).


7) Blacksmith shop ... not because it's particularly important to fight scenes or chases, but it's one of those sorts of shops that has a good excuse for being open to the air, and making good use of various spare weapons, tools, armor pieces, and other props (as well as an anvil) out where they can be seen, to make for a nice set-piece.


8) An alley.  For simplicity, I typically just represent this with a couple of "field-wall" barricades (rather than two complete multi-story BUILDINGS that the players have to peek and reach between for the minis), and some smattering of obstacles -- stacked crates, piles of refuse, perhaps a broken cart.  Perfect for obligatory thug ambushes when someone instinctively rushes after the sound of someone apparently crying for help.

 

9) Sewer.  Okay, so that's more for a CITY than a village, but it comes up now and again, when some Rats of Unusual Size need to be killed for a few silvers by beginning adventurers.

 

10) Pier/docks, with waterborne conveyance, or abstraction thereof.  (I've run quite a few pirate-themed games in various systems, so this tends to get more use at my house than it probably does on the typical table.)

 

 

Good list.

 

As for the Market Square stuff, Both Fenryll and Mirlinton have Market Stalls, vendors like butchers, fishmongers and bakery.

In Bones IV a small fish cart will be released which might be useful.

Mirlinton also has whole banquet sets and tavern sets, look in the Historical section for Medieval scenery.

 

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On 1/15/2019 at 3:35 AM, Glitterwolf said:

 

Good list.

 

As for the Market Square stuff, Both Fenryll and Mirlinton have Market Stalls, vendors like butchers, fishmongers and bakery.

In Bones IV a small fish cart will be released which might be useful.

Mirlinton also has whole banquet sets and tavern sets, look in the Historical section for Medieval scenery.

 

 

One of my back-burner projects is to upgrade/replace a lot of my old foam-and-craft-sticks "tavern" scenery (it hasn't aged well out in the garage) with some furnishings from the Hirst Arts Castlemolds tavern sets.  I love the look of the counter tops and cabinets/wardrobes, and the molds have lots of tiny fiddly bits (some so small you could lose them under a fingernail...) for bottles, loaves of bread, books, jars, bowls, lamps, candlestick holders, etc.

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29 minutes ago, Jordan Peacock said:

 

One of my back-burner projects is to upgrade/replace a lot of my old foam-and-craft-sticks "tavern" scenery (it hasn't aged well out in the garage) with some furnishings from the Hirst Arts Castlemolds tavern sets.  I love the look of the counter tops and cabinets/wardrobes, and the molds have lots of tiny fiddly bits (some so small you could lose them under a fingernail...) for bottles, loaves of bread, books, jars, bowls, lamps, candlestick holders, etc.

 

Minimonsters and Table Top Art Studios also have a lot of nice baskets, jars. vases, Candles, Books etc etc.

 

 

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33 minutes ago, Jordan Peacock said:

 

One of my back-burner projects is to upgrade/replace a lot of my old foam-and-craft-sticks "tavern" scenery (it hasn't aged well out in the garage) with some furnishings from the Hirst Arts Castlemolds tavern sets.  I love the look of the counter tops and cabinets/wardrobes, and the molds have lots of tiny fiddly bits (some so small you could lose them under a fingernail...) for bottles, loaves of bread, books, jars, bowls, lamps, candlestick holders, etc.

 

I have a few things like that from Mantic's terrain Crate KS. I've been tinkering with the idea of adding an interior to my tavern. It's big enough I think I could set it on a sheet of mdf and then have all the interior walls and things glued to the floor.

 

As well as a market I was thinking some sort of shops but would they even differ from a normal house in appearance? Weren't a lot of shops just workspace on one floor and living space upstairs? 

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16 hours ago, Zink said:

 

I have a few things like that from Mantic's terrain Crate KS. I've been tinkering with the idea of adding an interior to my tavern. It's big enough I think I could set it on a sheet of mdf and then have all the interior walls and things glued to the floor.

 

As well as a market I was thinking some sort of shops but would they even differ from a normal house in appearance? Weren't a lot of shops just workspace on one floor and living space upstairs? 

 

Maybe useful, look at these companies for more stuff.

 

Also check out HQ Resin , Minimonsters and Table Top Art Studios for small stuff.

 

 

 

 

Tabletop World :

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor blacksmith miniature building

 

Mirlinton :

Gerelateerde afbeelding

Gerelateerde afbeelding

 

Fenryll

Female  fishmonger

 

Medieval Shop Accessories

 

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