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Froggy the Great

Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

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2 hours ago, Unruly said:

What I want to know is who decided that angels were beautiful humans with wings?

 

Probably from artistic attempts to recreate the decoration on the top of the Ark of the Covenant. That reference is early, early in the Bible and it specifically mentions figures with wings. 

 

2 hours ago, Unruly said:

If I remember correctly, the mentions of angels describe them as either weird concepts or horrific nightmare beings. Like a series of wheels all merging and rolling inside of each other, or a bunch of animals that are stuck together and on fire.

 

The last two sentences are mostly from the books of Ezekiel and perhaps Daniel or Isaiah. Also the last half of the Revelation of John.

 

That said, Angel literally translates as messenger. There are numerous differing descriptions. And there are other places where Angels have the appearance of men and no mention of wings or feathers. 

 

The book you’d want to consult is titled A Dictionary of Angels. The concise version is that, on the subject of Angels, there is a massive Army of Jewish Folklore surrounding a tiny cadre of biblical references to them. 

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43 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

Open question: 

What is the right balance between light hearted and the world going down the pooper for your D&D worlds? I want to give my group characters they like, and victories to cheer for. I also want to demolish them and knock them and the world on their buttocks. Do you use say.... Buffy as an inspiration? Monster of the week, lots of funny, occasional saving the world? Or do you use Attack on Titan and Game of Thrones, where victories are fleeting and the world is in dire peril, often with little knowledge of how to stop it? 

 

My usual preference is for some genuine hope of improvement on whatever’s wrong with the world (and it may be a lot). I find relentlessly dire and depressing narratives exhausting and off-putting after a while. 

 

On on the other hand, I know several people who feel very different about it, so it very much depends on your group.

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47 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

Open question: 

What is the right balance between light hearted and the world going down the pooper for your D&D worlds? I want to give my group characters they like, and victories to cheer for. I also want to demolish them and knock them and the world on their buttocks. Do you use say.... Buffy as an inspiration? Monster of the week, lots of funny, occasional saving the world? Or do you use Attack on Titan and Game of Thrones, where victories are fleeting and the world is in dire peril, often with little knowledge of how to stop it? 

 

The right balance is whatever works for your group. (Remember that you are a part of your group, too. What you choose needs to work for you and your players.) Which isn't very helpful, but there you go.

 

Some people really like the grimdark of Warhammer FRP, some people like the generally upbeat tone of a golden-age style Champions game. Some like the cheerful desperation of Paranoia, and some like the gradual but inevitable descent into despair and madness of Call of Cthulhu.

 

Now, for me, I like a Bildungsroman style, where there are continual setbacks and obstacles, but a general feeling of progress throughout. I also like shades of gray in the world's morality but with most of the characters being generally decent folk that my characters want to help. You know, people who say "Thank you", remember that you helped them in the past, and return favors. Whether that works for you and your players

 

I will say that it usually helps to make your tone explicitly understood by your players before character building. It's very easy to make a character that would be perfectly viable in one sort of campaign that is entirely inappropriate (or disruptive) in another. And think seriously before letting in any character that you think will be saying, "It's just what my character would do", all the time. Paladins that don't play well with others, lone assassins, kender/gungans, berserkers who can't tell friend from foe, .... The problems usually come from tonal mismatch (and player immaturity, of course, but that's a problem regardless of any specific character decisions).

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3 hours ago, Cyradis said:

Open question: 

What is the right balance between light hearted and the world going down the pooper for your D&D worlds? I want to give my group characters they like, and victories to cheer for. I also want to demolish them and knock them and the world on their buttocks. Do you use say.... Buffy as an inspiration? Monster of the week, lots of funny, occasional saving the world? Or do you use Attack on Titan and Game of Thrones, where victories are fleeting and the world is in dire peril, often with little knowledge of how to stop it? 

 

I tend to like my games to feel real. Moral ambiguity runs rampant, but there's still a loose general sense of right and wrong that may change depending on where in the world you are. There should be a good combination of smaller, local problems but also problems that are regional or even worldwide that need resolving. And there should be some things that the players just can't swoop in and fix without a lot of effort, time, and repercussions.

 

But like Doug said, it depends on the group. And you need to make expectations known.

Edited by Unruly
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I'm not actually too concerned with group picking characters; they're there and fitting. My bad guys are Very Bad, and generally, there are consequences for the characters. The gray so far is on what they're willing to do to get what they need. 

 

Mixing the local stuff and the big stuff is kinda messy. Might have a plan for that, might not. On my end, it kinda feels like delaying them, but it could also be pretty interesting and set up consequences for how the later major events play out. 

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6 hours ago, Cyradis said:

Open question: 

What is the right balance between light hearted and the world going down the pooper for your D&D worlds? I want to give my group characters they like, and victories to cheer for. I also want to demolish them and knock them and the world on their buttocks. Do you use say.... Buffy as an inspiration? Monster of the week, lots of funny, occasional saving the world? Or do you use Attack on Titan and Game of Thrones, where victories are fleeting and the world is in dire peril, often with little knowledge of how to stop it? 

My worlds tend to be based on the long after the apocolipse scenario.  It was very very bad and only now are the remanients of civilization crawling bad out from under the pockets of survival.  And of course, so is evil.  That way there are hinterland to be explored, safe havens to be threatened and poignant reminders of what was lost, but the tone is usually positive.

 

One of the best campaigns I've had was post cthulhuesque.  Someone summoned the old gods and the weren't happy.  They stomped the planet flat for 5 eons did horrific things, and then, being inscrutable, one day they just left.  This left the world in chaos and reeling.  It also left great city's and dungeons to be explored, great mysteries to discover or not, and remanients of the great ones to be dealt with.  But the overall note of the campaign was still positive (at least for people who didn't discover this might only be a breather) and upbeat even though there were moments of great sorrow.

 

Anyway, that's where most of my best campaigns have gone.  For me Golarion works as a commercial world to play in really well!  Greyhawk always left me with the 'you guys are lazy' vibe.  Why are these dungeons and stuff still here?

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2 hours ago, Cyradis said:

I'm not actually too concerned with group picking characters; they're there and fitting. My bad guys are Very Bad, and generally, there are consequences for the characters. The gray so far is on what they're willing to do to get what they need. 

 

Mixing the local stuff and the big stuff is kinda messy. Might have a plan for that, might not. On my end, it kinda feels like delaying them, but it could also be pretty interesting and set up consequences for how the later major events play out. 

 

You don't need to make the local stuff tie into the big stuff. Maybe the party has a favorite shopkeeper and the local thieves' guild suddenly starts putting pressure on them. So the shopkeeper asks the party for help, but is hiding the fact that the reason for the pressure is because they're massively in debt to the guild thanks to a gambling habit. Maybe a doppelganger is running around town disguised as a party member and is causing trouble while trying to cash in on their fame, so suddenly the city watch is putting that person in shackles and the party has to clear their name. Something small, but semi-personal, and that may not even need combat to resolve.

 

Stuff like that tends to be a middle ground between plain downtime and the big adventure. It gives something to do, gives role play opportunities, and can create new allies or foes for later. Who knows, maybe the party decided to pay off the shopkeeper's debt by pulling a big job for the thieves' guild? And maybe rather than kill the doppelganger they befriend it and now they have an expert infiltrator agent they can call on in the future when they need more info about the Osiris cult that's trying to destroy the world...

Edited by Unruly
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I didn't think this warranted a show off thread so I'm sticking it here. 

 

In the bones 4 core set there's a bunch of those fence toppers. I have no intention of buying a fence so I decided they needed an alternative use. I occasionally like to paint a mini and then leave it somewhere in public. Sometimes it's as simple as hiding it in a potted plant at the bar, sometimes I might superglue it to something. It's my little contribution to keeping my neighborhood weird. 

 

So I realized those fence toppers would be good to paint up and leave around the area. I've seen a couple of the remains of ones I've superglued down after they've been destroyed in the removal process. So I decided to start sticking magnets in these so when someone snags it they have a nice little magnet to take and maybe show people. Hopefully it makes someone happy for a brief time. 

 

Anyhow, enough rambling, here's the first of the fence toppers I've left around...

 

20190514_195257.thumb.jpg.6d25f709290c03509150b0dad6a69827.jpg

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11 hours ago, Cyradis said:

Do you use say.... Buffy as an inspiration? Monster of the week, lots of funny, occasional saving the world? Or do you use Attack on Titan and Game of Thrones, where victories are fleeting and the world is in dire peril, often with little knowledge of how to stop it? 

It depends.  The silliness or seriousness, the hopefulness or hopelessness, depends on what the players want at the time.  Since campaigns tend to last a while, a middle ground from which there can be deviation seems to work pretty well.

 

My default campaign structure starts with characters of relatively humble beginnings who evolve and progress into important people in the world and the best chance to save the world from Certain Doom.

 

One thing I experimented with in my last Exalted campaign (and quite possibly my last campaign, period) was making sure character actions had consequences.  In some cases, this caused fascinating developments.  In other cases, I'm sure it was going to inconvenience characters further down the line (but we never got there).  This works for a character-driven campaign but possibly not so much for a plot-driven one.  (It's also really important to not use consequences to punish players or PCs.)

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17 hours ago, PaganMegan said:

Espresso shots in hot cocoa! ::D:

 

I need to try that!

Remember, Pingo is trying to start with small doses of your drug of choice - an espresso shot kind of misses that mark. :lol:

 

And I still remember what happened with that bag of chocolate covered coffee beans.... ::D:

 

The Auld Grump - Megan sequestered herself with the computer last night, leaving me and Brigid to work on our plan for world domination. :devil:

11 hours ago, Cyradis said:

Open question: 

What is the right balance between light hearted and the world going down the pooper for your D&D worlds? I want to give my group characters they like, and victories to cheer for. I also want to demolish them and knock them and the world on their buttocks. Do you use say.... Buffy as an inspiration? Monster of the week, lots of funny, occasional saving the world? Or do you use Attack on Titan and Game of Thrones, where victories are fleeting and the world is in dire peril, often with little knowledge of how to stop it? 

Look for the Die Hard Effect -

1234347198_1e9b7b8e34.jpg?v=0

 

A hard earned victory is savored more than an easy victory - but the players do want to win. ::):

 

The Auld Grump

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2 hours ago, Thoramel said:

I didn't think this warranted a show off thread so I'm sticking it here. 

 

In the bones 4 core set there's a bunch of those fence toppers. I have no intention of buying a fence so I decided they needed an alternative use. I occasionally like to paint a mini and then leave it somewhere in public. Sometimes it's as simple as hiding it in a potted plant at the bar, sometimes I might superglue it to something. It's my little contribution to keeping my neighborhood weird. 

 

So I realized those fence toppers would be good to paint up and leave around the area. I've seen a couple of the remains of ones I've superglued down after they've been destroyed in the removal process. So I decided to start sticking magnets in these so when someone snags it they have a nice little magnet to take and maybe show people. Hopefully it makes someone happy for a brief time. 

 

Anyhow, enough rambling, here's the first of the fence toppers I've left around...

 

20190514_195257.thumb.jpg.6d25f709290c03509150b0dad6a69827.jpg

 

I didn't need fence toppers but have put a bunch of them to use as other things. The gargoyles I painted a basic grey and they get used as giant flies, bats and anything else smaller with wings that I don't have a mini for. Those braziers I painted like you did because I can always use braziers. I'm considering getting more sometime because I could use some without flames too.

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7 hours ago, Cyradis said:

What is the right balance between light hearted and the world going down the pooper for your D&D worlds?

 

Neither. [?]  Why are those the only 2 options?

 

There oughtsta be at least 3 other options. 

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Start of my weekend. Dropped the car off for repairs then had an egg mcmuffin outside it the patio. Really don't want to look at the to do list quite yet.

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Friday!!!

 

12 hours ago, Cyradis said:

Open question: 

What is the right balance between light hearted and the world going down the pooper for your D&D worlds? I want to give my group characters they like, and victories to cheer for. I also want to demolish them and knock them and the world on their buttocks. Do you use say.... Buffy as an inspiration? Monster of the week, lots of funny, occasional saving the world? Or do you use Attack on Titan and Game of Thrones, where victories are fleeting and the world is in dire peril, often with little knowledge of how to stop it? 

 

I usually lean toward the Buffy side of things to start, and then get darker. 

 

3 hours ago, Thoramel said:

I didn't think this warranted a show off thread so I'm sticking it here. 

 

In the bones 4 core set there's a bunch of those fence toppers. I have no intention of buying a fence so I decided they needed an alternative use. I occasionally like to paint a mini and then leave it somewhere in public. Sometimes it's as simple as hiding it in a potted plant at the bar, sometimes I might superglue it to something. It's my little contribution to keeping my neighborhood weird. 

 

So I realized those fence toppers would be good to paint up and leave around the area. I've seen a couple of the remains of ones I've superglued down after they've been destroyed in the removal process. So I decided to start sticking magnets in these so when someone snags it they have a nice little magnet to take and maybe show people. Hopefully it makes someone happy for a brief time. 

 

Anyhow, enough rambling, here's the first of the fence toppers I've left around...

 

20190514_195257.thumb.jpg.6d25f709290c03509150b0dad6a69827.jpg

That's an awesome idea!!

 

 

Need

More

Coffee...

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