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Froggy the Great

Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

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16 hours ago, Corsair said:

HhQDCo8.jpg

They forgot to add a random meow into there to really nail the Super Troopers reference. 

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15 hours ago, PaganMegan said:

 

Like Dudley Moore dancing around Peter Cook?.

Meeester Geribaldi!

 

Have you seen the gag reel yet? :lol:

 

We have the RPGs of B5. Both the old one and the D20 one. I've never played either.

 

Mum and I are watching Ant Man followed by Ant Man and the Wasp.

 

I've only seen them about six times each.

I've played it! (the D20 version)

 

As expected, we were a motley crew.

 

I was a human mob doctor/biologist, the kind whose patients don't want to draw attention. I also worked on the station hydroponics/air generators. After saving the life of a technomage, they gave me a portable device that did... "undefined". It had over a dozen specific functions, but I had to discover them (this was before smartphones were a thing, and there was no touchscreen).

 

We had a Narn warrior, who taught my character how to greet people in peace in the Narn language. In actuality, he taught me to say "I have a very small penis." It's only when we were on an asteroid, facing Narn mercenaries that I uttered the phrase while wearing our comm helmets that happened to have a translator on it. So I finally understood what I was saying for far too long in too many circumstances.

 

Also had a human rogue telepath who disguised himself as a Centauri to escape Psi Corps. When my character had to perform first aid/surgery on him, many questions had to be answered.

 

I forget details of our Mimbari character, but we participated in a sort of ceremonial Iron Man competition on Mimbar and some unarmed combat.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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1 hour ago, Loim said:

As I've gotten older and my life has become more difficult and complicated there are some books that have become akin to comfort food for me. Kind of like those movies that you rewatch every year at a certain time. As a late adopter of digital media I have embraced it mostly due to the space savings. I don't particularly like digital books, but they have advantages. My book collection was nearing critical mass. Also it's much easier to carry a few hundred books around with you all the time. Because I'm mostly reading via Kindle these days it is a source of great annoyance to me that there are some of my comfort books that I can't get Kindle copies of. One of these is A Night in Lonesome October. Now I have no doubts there are some legal shenanigans that prevent it from being ported over. However, as it's a book I like to read every October or so, this is small comfort to me. I realize that this is a very first world problem, but it's on my mind this morning.

 

There are some authors who were very reluctant to let amazon and other digital publishers have access to their work. I imagine royalty issues were involved as well as loyalty to the physical format and a dislike of being in thrall to such a large, unaccountable corporation.

 

The number of "hold-outs" are dwindling. As a devoted kindle user I'm not sure if I'm glad about that or not. 

Edited by paintybeard
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7 hours ago, Unruly said:

 

Are you familiar with D&D? I'm going to assume so, given the nature of this board and how miniatures correspond greatly to RPGs in general.

 

Well, in D&D there are planes of existence that overlap on top of the prime material plane. They exist simultaneously with, and in the same space as, the prime material plane. In D&D they're typically the ethereal plane, the plane of shadow, and the Feywild. They all overlap on top of the prime material plane and so their geography and even their existence is shaped by the prime material plane. Generally, while in one of those planes you're unable to do much to the prime material, but in certain areas or through certain actions you can have a limited effect. Which would be something like the ability to make lights flicker.

 

I have a feeling that the Upside Down generally follows similar principles to those. It is shaped by and tied to the prime material plane, rather than existing as it own complete entity.

 

You could be right. It'd explain some details as far as before and after, in the series. But the inconsistency bugs me, at least until I focus on the MST3k mantra: "It's just a show, you should really just relax."

 

Then again, I was never crazy about the plane of shadow and the feywild, either; seems like they rearrange the cosmology with every new edition. Along with what goblins look like.

Amusingly enough, I finally got around to looking at that Stranger Things D&D set I bought as a result of watching the show for the second time. The adventure in the box corresponds to the adventure the boys are playing at the table in the show, and I found it entertaining as all hell that whoever wrote the adventure made VERY sure it touched on all the elements...

And interestingly? The Demogorgon corresponds very closely to a first edition D&D troll in stats and abilities. D&D now has more than one sort of demogorgon....
91IFR-u9aoL._SL1500_.jpg.3292d66c1f14e249bd21c1f05fea7bed.jpg

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7 hours ago, strawhat said:

 

Also Farscape if you have the chance (and haven't already)!  I can't believe it's been 20 years already.

 

Michael O'Hare's dry acting is probably (at least in part) due to his declining mental facilities.  At the time B5 came, O'Hare was slipping into paranoid delusions.  His departure was to enable him to seek treatment.  He recovered enough to take some later work, but I suspect that he fought his illness until his death in 2012.

 

That is sad.

 

He's pretty wooden in his part, but the character is also supposed be be a little stiff, so I give it 50/50 between role and actor.

 

One of the tragedies of Babylon 5 is the higher-than-you-might-expect mortality rate among the cast since the show ended. :down:

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1 hour ago, Loim said:

As I've gotten older and my life has become more difficult and complicated there are some books that have become akin to comfort food for me. Kind of like those movies that you rewatch every year at a certain time. As a late adopter of digital media I have embraced it mostly due to the space savings. I don't particularly like digital books, but they have advantages. My book collection was nearing critical mass. Also it's much easier to carry a few hundred books around with you all the time. Because I'm mostly reading via Kindle these days it is a source of great annoyance to me that there are some of my comfort books that I can't get Kindle copies of. One of these is A Night in Lonesome October. Now I have no doubts there are some legal shenanigans that prevent it from being ported over. However, as it's a book I like to read every October or so, this is small comfort to me. I realize that this is a very first world problem, but it's on my mind this morning.

Have you tried searching for it as a PDF?

GEM

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14 hours ago, PaganMegan said:

 

We have the RPGs of B5. Both the old one and the D20 one. I've never played either.

 

Mum and I are watching Ant Man followed by Ant Man and the Wasp.

 

I've only seen them about six times each.

 

I own a bunch of the books from the Mongoose d20 game, but never got to play it. It contains a lot of interesting conjectural background information though.

 

My friends and I played the heck out of the Agents of Gaming space combat game. Sadly, AoG lost the license and folded back in 2002, and the game was largely eclipsed by the relative popularity of Mongoose's "Babylon 5: A Call to Arms" game. Ironically, most of the ACTA miniatures people liked were re-spins of the old Agents of Gaming molds.

 

I still miss my Pak'Ma'Ra battle squadron (squidron?).

 

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Michael O'Hare, Richard Biggs, Stephen Furst, Andreas Katsulas, Jerry Doyle, Jeff Conaway...wow. Yeah. And quite a few more who haven't acted since. Interesting. 

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55 minutes ago, paintybeard said:

 

There are some authors who were very reluctant to let amazon and other digital publishers have access to their work. I imagine royalty issues were involved as well as loyalty to the physical format and a dislike of being in thrall to such a large, unaccountable corporation.

 

The number of "hold-outs" are dwindling. As a devoted kindle user I'm not sure if I'm glad about that or not. 

 

Charles Stross has remarked that he LIKES ebooks and epublishers, as he, the author, gets a bigger bite of the income when a book does well. On the other hand, I can appreciate being nervous about modern epublishers. A thing that irks me is that Stross's most recent work is durned hard to find in hardcopy.

Then again, I recall Harlan Ellison's stories about battles with publishers who took his books and stories and performed great atrocities on them before releasing the crippled, mutilated results to the public. Or so Ellison reports.

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13 minutes ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

 

Charles Stross has remarked that he LIKES ebooks and epublishers, as he, the author, gets a bigger bite of the income when a book does well. On the other hand, I can appreciate being nervous about modern epublishers. A thing that irks me is that Stross's most recent work is durned hard to find in hardcopy.

Then again, I recall Harlan Ellison's stories about battles with publishers who took his books and stories and performed great atrocities on them before releasing the crippled, mutilated results to the public. Or so Ellison reports.

 

I sympathise with Ellison, but there were times when I felt that if he used the phrase "Publishing mavens" even ONE MORE TIME I would commit physical violence.

 

The same thing applies to Kurt Vonnegut 's "And so it goes."

 

We need limits, people.

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29 minutes ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

Then again, I recall Harlan Ellison's stories about battles with publishers who took his books and stories and performed great atrocities on them before releasing the crippled, mutilated results to the public. Or so Ellison reports.

 

I'm not much of a fan of Ellison's work*, so I won't comment specifically on his travails.

 

But I can certainly think of lots of authors who could really have used quite a few more editorial atrocities ... like about 40% of the book dumped in the bit bucket.

 

* Or Ellison, TBH, though I know at least one person who really likes him personally.

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1 hour ago, Dr.Bedlam said:

You could be right. It'd explain some details as far as before and after, in the series. But the inconsistency bugs me, at least until I focus on the MST3k mantra: "It's just a show, you should really just relax."

 

Then again, I was never crazy about the plane of shadow and the feywild, either; seems like they rearrange the cosmology with every new edition. Along with what goblins look like.

Amusingly enough, I finally got around to looking at that Stranger Things D&D set I bought as a result of watching the show for the second time. The adventure in the box corresponds to the adventure the boys are playing at the table in the show, and I found it entertaining as all hell that whoever wrote the adventure made VERY sure it touched on all the elements...

And interestingly? The Demogorgon corresponds very closely to a first edition D&D troll in stats and abilities. D&D now has more than one sort of demogorgon....
 

I actually thought the revamp of the cosmology in 4e to be one of the best things to come out of that editions fluff. 

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7 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

I'm not much of a fan of Ellison's work*, so I won't comment specifically on his travails.

 

But I can certainly think of lots of authors who could really have used quite a few more editorial atrocities ... like about 40% of the book dumped in the bit bucket.

 

* Or Ellison, TBH, though I know at least one person who really likes him personally.

 

Yes, I would expect that Mr Ellison probably qualifies for the Doug Sundseth Vileness Award (TM).

 

And, for once, I wouldn't argue, much. :;):

 

Having seen him in full flow at a book signing he has what I call a 5' 3" attitude.   

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