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Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.


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1 hour ago, Corsair said:

Be on the lookout for a green eyed monster with pink toenails and their accomplish a stinky goblin....

 

I never mess with plants.  In my experience it's a good way to get strangled by vines, eaten and slowly digested, sprayed in the face with mind control spores or, most horrific of all, the accidental ingestion of nutritious vitamins.  

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3 minutes ago, buglips*the*goblin said:

 

I never mess with plants.  In my experience it's a good way to get strangled by vines, eaten and slowly digested, sprayed in the face with mind control spores or, most horrific of all, the accidental ingestion of nutritious vitamins.  

Speaking of, time for lunch!

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“Time to go live in the woods with the wolves!”,

...she said, to the Glitter Wolf :ph34r:

 

 

Edited by TGP
That actually sounds like a decent plan. I’ve heard he’s a pretty good cook.
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2 hours ago, TheAuldGrump said:

 

Not that it will matter too much - Death Cap Mushrooms are spreading across North America.

 

 

Fascinating. Have not seen these in my neck of the woods, but it's only a matter of time. Thanks for the link to that article.

 

I work in a lot of places where people don't normally go and during the growing season I typically have a gaggle of interns following me around. While technically they are all adults, it is still necessary to keep a close eye on some of them to make sure they don't put anything in their mouths. We see a lot of Amanita varieties, several of which look just like the "magic" kind but which in reality cause delusions, paranoia and death. I'm always looking for ways to drive home just how dangerous those are so some college kid a little too used to partying doesn't kill themselves. I think I'm going to put this article into the required reading list for new interns. Maybe it will help. 

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Computer won out over bed. Feel like that might have been the wrong choice. Kids were happy they didn't have to go to school. Then #2 kid's temperature started to skyrocket. Probably has the hand, foot and mouth too now. Sucks for him that he has to miss his no school days being sick. 

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39 minutes ago, Thoramel said:

 

Fascinating. Have not seen these in my neck of the woods, but it's only a matter of time. Thanks for the link to that article.

 

I work in a lot of places where people don't normally go and during the growing season I typically have a gaggle of interns following me around. While technically they are all adults, it is still necessary to keep a close eye on some of them to make sure they don't put anything in their mouths. We see a lot of Amanita varieties, several of which look just like the "magic" kind but which in reality cause delusions, paranoia and death. I'm always looking for ways to drive home just how dangerous those are so some college kid a little too used to partying doesn't kill themselves. I think I'm going to put this article into the required reading list for new interns. Maybe it will help. 

 

I grew up in an area with a several species of Amantia, including the highly deadly Destroying Angel (Amanita bisporigera is our exact species).  You hear of a few poisonings a year, mostly from Asian immigrants who think they are Paddy Straw Hat mushrooms.  We do have a lot of good edible mushrooms in MN and WI, but we are all raised to avoid any mushrooms with gills (even though some are good) because of the risk of confusing them with one of the Anamtias and related poisonous ones.  I did spend a lot of my childhood picking morels and boletes.

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Plant identification is something I've always wanted to do. I was briefly part of the Range team in FFA before my parents realized that would mean I'd get to stay after school. The teacher was so insistent on the importance of proper identification that to this day, I'm still uncomfortable identifying things on my own. My love knows that one of my dream gifts would be to find a botanist who would let me follow them around so I can learn haha. Let me bug you, friendly botanists! I'll pay! :lol:

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33 minutes ago, Morihalda said:

Plant identification is something I've always wanted to do. I was briefly part of the Range team in FFA before my parents realized that would mean I'd get to stay after school. The teacher was so insistent on the importance of proper identification that to this day, I'm still uncomfortable identifying things on my own. My love knows that one of my dream gifts would be to find a botanist who would let me follow them around so I can learn haha. Let me bug you, friendly botanists! I'll pay! :lol:

 

I always reccomend 3 things to the aspiring botanist/ecologist. First, learn plant anatomy basics. You can get flash cards for this. Second, get a basic illustrated guide to wildflowers. If you're in North America, Newcomb's Wildflower Guide is a great resource. And third, go wander around the nearest natural area with your book as often as you can. Its surprising, once you know your plant anatomy, how easy it is to pick up at least the basics. Before you know it you'll be all "No, that's not Mimulus ringens, it's Mimulus alatus. See how the leaves are on short stalks?" And then all your friends will quit going on hikes with you because you're too nerdy. Fun times!

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2 minutes ago, Thoramel said:

 

I always reccomend 3 things to the aspiring botanist/ecologist. First, learn plant anatomy basics. You can get flash cards for this. Second, get a basic illustrated guide to wildflowers. If you're in North America, Newcomb's Wildflower Guide is a great resource. And third, go wander around the nearest natural area with your book as often as you can. Its surprising, once you know your plant anatomy, how easy it is to pick up at least the basics. Before you know it you'll be all "No, that's not Mimulus ringens, it's Mimulus alatus. See how the leaves are on short stalks?" And then all your friends will quit going on hikes with you because you're too nerdy. Fun times!

 

I have collected quite a few identification books, especially for birds and trees. I like taking them with me when we go camping. ^_^

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2 minutes ago, Thoramel said:
50 minutes ago, Morihalda said:

Plant identification is something I've always wanted to do. I was briefly part of the Range team in FFA before my parents realized that would mean I'd get to stay after school. The teacher was so insistent on the importance of proper identification that to this day, I'm still uncomfortable identifying things on my own. My love knows that one of my dream gifts would be to find a botanist who would let me follow them around so I can learn haha. Let me bug you, friendly botanists! I'll pay! :lol:

 

I always reccomend 3 things to the aspiring botanist/ecologist. First, learn plant anatomy basics. You can get flash cards for this. Second, get a basic illustrated guide to wildflowers. If you're in North America, Newcomb's Wildflower Guide is a great resource. And third, go wander around the nearest natural area with your book as often as you can. Its surprising, once you know your plant anatomy, how easy it is to pick up at least the basics. Before you know it you'll be all "No, that's not Mimulus ringens, it's Mimulus alatus. See how the leaves are on short stalks?" And then all your friends will quit going on hikes with you because you're too nerdy. Fun times!

 

Apparently, I and Mori share a weird; I'd be fascinated, and probably go out of my way to go on hikes with somebody who knew plants.. 

 

.. admittedly, I'm the twit who discovered stinging nettle by.. well.. being stung by it. To further confuse matters... I have some non-stinging nettle in my yard. PLANTS!

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1 minute ago, Morihalda said:

 

I have collected quite a few identification books, especially for birds and trees. I like taking them with me when we go camping. ^_^

 

Bird books are awesome! If I could be any kind of naturalist, without worrying about paying the bills, ornithology would be the way to go!

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