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Froggy the Great

Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

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On 5/25/2019 at 12:32 PM, Xiwo Xerase said:

This was for my wife's job.

 

My crisis management principles simplified:

 

* Don't panic.

* If possible, know ways the system can fail ahead of time and plan accordingly.

* Crises should be communicated to the appropriate persons immediately.  (Don't give your manager more unexpected surprises than you have to.  Also, your manager may be able to call in people to help that you can't yourself.)

* Designate someone to be responsible for communication and coordination.  (When you're waist deep in crap, you may not have enough cycles to communicate or to think clearly.  Having someone else responsible for this limits interruptions to the investigators and gives them someone to present facts to, who may have a clearer picture of what's going on.)  (In some circumstances, you may need to split communication and coordination between different people.)

* Don't panic.

* Make sure you know what the problem really is before you fix it.  (For example, when a heat pump runs low on coolant, the coils inside the inside unit will ice over.  A simple solution is to add more coolant, but that will only buy you time if the coolant tubes have a leak.)

* Make sure to review the issue and the actions taken after the fact.

* Make sure to establish a plan to prevent recurrences.

* Actually follow through on that plan.

* (That which I say three times it true.) Don't panic.

 

I ended up in the coordinator role last night because the equipment with issues wasn't mine, so I had the spare cycles to research, takes notes, etc.

 

I'm not sure how much more I'm allowed to say.

 

We're going to have to check up on the equipment tonight, tomorrow night, and maybe Monday night.  The joys of things breaking during an extended weekend.

 

 

20 hours ago, Mad Jack said:

 

 This is what I repeatedly tell everyone I train to run a machine - the obvious problem isn't always the ONLY problem, or even related to the reason the machine stopped...

 

Last week, I was up on the second floor checking on whether or not I needed to run some more boxes for a job... The big bosses and the engineers were all gathered around my old machine getting really angry and shouting because it kept getting jammed and they couldn't get it to go again. Apparently they'd been there for almost five minutes. I took a second to watch them trying to fix it, then walked around the back, fished out the plastic nozzle fragment that had gotten stuck in the place they usually get stuck in if nobody thinks to clean it out on a regular basis - which they never do, and started the machine back up. I then had to explain to seven people who's weekly salaries have more digits than a month of my paychecks that whenever the machine jammed they had to stop and take the time to go through the thing and check all the common jam points and clean out the accumulated crap inside the machine so that it wouldn't get stuck under or inbetween the gears and jam up again.

I work as a reliability engineer for maintenance, so you guys are talking my language.

 

Understanding *why* something broke is one of the first steps to fixing stuff. And getting to the root cause may allow you to find a permanent fix to it.

 

We also got a good assets manager with experience who understands the value of proper planning and execution.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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About to walk into my workplace for the first time in three weeks for a union vote on our new contract (which was supposed to be done at the end of last year <_<). I don't expect it, but it would be really nice if paid maternity leave was included in the contract. I could extend my leave and maybe be able to get my baby to tolerate not being held constantly before returning to work. 

 

But again, I don't expect it. I mean, this contract is almost six months late. With that kind of competence, how can I expect them to get maternity leave?

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4 hours ago, Kangaroorex said:

I don't say its right or wrong and I personally, normally check for the simple stuff, however, it is typical and you can usually learn some new words if the engineer or tech finds out that it was something that the operator or first level tech should have figured out.  I know I have waxed poetic a time or two when someone has neglected to mention they didn't check the field before calling me in to fix a programing problem!


This is part of the troubleshooting document that gets sent out to all my customers:
 

Quote

Oh. Is that why some tech support people ask me obvious questions like “Is it plugged in” like I’m some kind of idiot?
Yep. It’s not because they think you’re an idiot, it’s because a lot of time and energy can be saved by asking the seemingly
stupid questions up front. No one wants to spend hours, days or even weeks troubleshooting something just to
backtrack and figure out that a cord wasn’t plugged in, a button not pressed, a switch not flipped, etc. Anything that
would have been caught right away, if only the question had been asked and answered makes it worth asking the seemingly
stupid questions.


but of course, no one reads that document...

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I'm thankful today for two big things...  One, that we had the fans going full blast with windows open this morning, and two that hubby wanted tacos for supper.

 

First it's because it's 32C outside, but only 25C indoors.  Second?  I had no clue what I was going to make for supper, so tacos sounds amazing.

 

Plus, one of my customers that likes to bug me about how we do tacos whenever we want...  I delivered to her today.  She was happy we were doing taco tuesday for some reason.

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Not a huge fan of Monday off when it means the rest of the week has five days worth of stuff squashed into four days.  Time to brace for the end of school madness...

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1 hour ago, Chaoswolf said:

Shenanigans!

 

Accurate! As long as you mean "studying for the CPA"

 

12 minutes ago, redambrosia said:

I was right. No maternity leave.

Boo....

 

Okay, breaks over. 

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And now a big thunderstorm rolling in. Got the dogs out for the evening walk just in time thanks to the alert on my phone. Made it back inside with about 2 minutes to spare. 

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How long does someone need to be dead for it to be considered 'archaeology' and not 'grave robbing'?

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12 minutes ago, Chaoswolf said:

How long does someone need to be dead for it to be considered 'archaeology' and not 'grave robbing'?

This feels like a GTKY question... but I'll bite. Does the civilization still exist in the area the grave is located in? If yes, grave robbing. If no, archaeology. Or maybe... 300+ years?

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