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Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.


Froggy the Great
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2 minutes ago, SparrowMarie said:

I'm setting up a discord server for one of my other hobbies (planning) because none seem to exist. It sure is complicated.

 

You can message me on discord if you have questions. They pretty much run themselves once started :) 

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37 minutes ago, kristof65 said:

So I'm trying to get more professional with the tutorial videos I create for my client.  The microphone I was using for my last series just isn't cutting it - getting too many pops when i say certain words, like "speed" and "test" 

 

Any recommendations for relatively inexpensive microphones that are better than my mediocre HP gaming headset? 

 

A few come to mind, aside from the possibility of a rental from say, Guitar Center or other music store... 

 

- Deity microphones Lavalier

- Audio Technica AT2020 (available as XLR, or USB) 

- Rode NT-USB

- AntLion ModMic.

 

Uhm... Trying to think of other microphones that are great but don't break the bank.  The ModMic is awesome, if I didn't have a Rode NT1 (the newer, black beauty) I'd be rocking a ModMic. 

 

20 minutes ago, kristof65 said:

maybe that's where I should start with this one.  I think the pops are coming from the air I exhale during those sounds. 

"Speed test" has two big plosives in it, as well as one smaller one, which is probably where those pops are coming from.  First half of "speed" and the first half of "test" are both rather potent for this, and somewhat with the second half of test, depending on how you enunciate.

 

Two things to try that can be done with current gear, and usually under $5 worth of stuff.. 

- build a makeshift pop filter out of dollar store panty hose and some sort of open circular frame (like say a cross stitch holder thingy).  Stretch the panty hose across such, and place between your mouth and the mic

- second idea is technically free - does the mic boom move or swivel?  If possible, try having the mic either a little further away, or up/down slightly.  This can help, but doesn't work with all scenarios, and can also require increasing the gain, which can increase the noise floor (aka adds audible hiss) 

Edited by WhiteWulfe
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I may have been a slight bit premature in my booing of Steamforged Games. It would appear that the Critical Role minis I saw were part of a Kickstarter, and are planned for retail. But I will still boo their limited releases of certain Critical Role based figures. Especially considering the one I saw was Victor, the crazy gunpowder guy.

 

My paycheck this week included my sick time buyback. An extra $500 because I only took like 3 sick days all last (fiscal)year. Sadly, my original plan for that money is no longer feasible. I was going to buy a new compound bow, but dental bills now take priority.

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1 minute ago, WhiteWulfe said:

second idea is technically free - does the mic boom move or swivel?  If possible, try having the mic either a little further away, or up/down slightly.  This can help, but doesn't work with all scenarios, and can also require increasing the gain, which can increase the noise floor (aka adds audible hiss) 

This is where I started, but I got interrupted in the middle of recording my voice overs, and had a heck of a time getting it back to the same position - wasn't fully successful. 

just found some cheap foam covers, we'll see how those work on Monday. 

Thanks for the other ideas. 

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27 minutes ago, kristof65 said:

So I'm trying to get more professional with the tutorial videos I create for my client.  The microphone I was using for my last series just isn't cutting it - getting too many pops when i say certain words, like "speed" and "test" 

 

Any recommendations for relatively inexpensive microphones that are better than my mediocre HP gaming headset? 

 

sorry, inexpensive is not usually the side of things I do, but if you have one near you you may want to consider just dropping by a guitar and instrument store and seeing what they've got as far as used stuff, they might still be on the high end of what you're looking for but there's a good chance they'll keep working for a veeeery long time. just make sure they let you test it before you buy anything

 

(for example we still have a bunch of perfectly good shure mics at work that are 20 years older than me and still working well)

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5 minutes ago, Werkrobotwerk said:

(for example we still have a bunch of perfectly good shure mics at work that are 20 years older than me and still working well)

Are those the old Shure SM58's that even punk rockers had trouble killing? ...The old US made ones many say were built like tanks? 

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7 minutes ago, WhiteWulfe said:

Are those the old Shure SM58's that even punk rockers had trouble killing? ...The old US made ones many say were built like tanks? 

sm56, sm57, sm58, sm59, and a few other random ones. One of the guys who worked here before me was apparently a former grateful dead roadie, and just kept ordering "stuff that never breaks"

Edited by Werkrobotwerk
I listed the weird stuff and totally forgot the point of what I was saying, oops!
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1 hour ago, Zink said:

I agree with what you wrote about bandsaws with one addition. The edges of the cuts are often rough needing to be sanded.

 

Hmm, when I had access to a bandsaw, the edges it cut were quite smooth. I wonder whether the difference is a blade-type or tooth-size issue.

 

FWIW, I was cutting blocks with beveled sides for use in making 25mm scale gunboats for use in Space 1889, so I was using blocks of foam about 2" thick with angles ranging from vertical to around 60° and getting nice, sharp edges and corners (where I would expect the most trouble). This was using EPS foam; I didn't have XPS at the time.

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2 hours ago, kristof65 said:

So I'm trying to get more professional with the tutorial videos I create for my client.  The microphone I was using for my last series just isn't cutting it - getting too many pops when i say certain words, like "speed" and "test" 

 

Any recommendations for relatively inexpensive microphones that are better than my mediocre HP gaming headset? 

 

For inexpensive mics with decent quality, Blue has a selection. If you're going to be the only person talking, I'd suggest a mic with a cardioid pickup pattern.

 

 I'd add a pop filter (they can be attached to the stand pretty easily). If you need to do any location shooting in a breeze, you'll probably want a dead cat.

 

1 hour ago, Gadgetman! said:

The mics I have most experience with are 'Conferencing'  table mics.

They're built to handle normal speech, mostly, and does it beautifully. 

Doesn't weork well with mumbling, paper sorters or nervous chai-shuffling, though.

 

I use a similar mic for my Google Hangouts Pathfinder games. The one I have is a SoundTech CM-1000 USB and I've had it for several years with no problems.

 

Another possibility would be to use a lavalier mic, which is normally placed out of the direct line of air from plosives, but they can be tricky to set just right.

Edited by Doug Sundseth
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