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Froggy the Great

Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

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1 hour ago, redambrosia said:

They're cute! What's weird about that!

 

Just remember the rule of Pokémon does indeed apply in the real world too.  The cuter it is, the deadlier it is.  Or it's parents that very much so didn't abandon it on the side of the road so tourists could look at it.

 

1 hour ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

They need a lot more range per animal than domestic cattle.  About 20 acres per Bison is optimum, although they can be raised on smaller plots.

Properly raised and humanely slaughtered they make very good eating.

GEM

They make for really really good smokies and burgers!

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2 minutes ago, WhiteWulfe said:

 

Just remember the rule of Pokémon does indeed apply in the real world too.  The cuter it is, the deadlier it is.  Or it's parents that very much so didn't abandon it on the side of the road so tourists could look at it.

 

They make for really really good smokies and burgers!

 

Mix the bison with chicken, some seasonings, an egg for binding, and some barbecue sauce.  Add in bread crumbs as needed.  Form into patties and grill until done.  Serve on a Kaiser bun.

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2 hours ago, strawhat said:

Y'know, the first time I read this I missed that you said polar bear.

 

I'd (sort of) understand if it were a black bear at the campground or near a small town.  I mean the wild bears don't carry signs saying "Hey, I'm dangerous."

You are a lot more likely to be mauled by a black bear than a grizzly (or a polar bear, for that matter).

 

Mostly because people are idiots, and black bears don't look as dangerous....

 

I also used to know someone that got clobbered by a mountain lion.

 

Not mauled, not attacked... a mountain lion that was barreling along, not looking where it was going, plowed into him.

 

It smacked into him, and they both went down in a tangle of arms, legs, and claws.

 

He ended up needing stitches, but the lion got up faster than he did, and went on barreling along.... It didn't deliberately claw him, he was just where it's claws happened to be.

 

He was strangely proud of the scars.

 

My own close encounters with wild animals have been much more prosaic. (The most dangerous being a brown recluse - I carried it outside on the back of my hand and shook it off.)

 

Black bears I move away from, and do not look directly at them.

 

The Auld Grump - though I have been mobbed by a flock of friendly crows. When crows like you, they have no sense of personal space.

Edited by TheAuldGrump
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10 hours ago, haldir said:

My wife took her car into the tire shop yesterday to get a small nail out & the tire guy told the sides of the tire were slowly leaking. Disaster averted! That would have been a Major PiTA on our trip over to the western side of the state next month!

 

Good call!

Dodged a bullet there!

 

5 hours ago, redambrosia said:

I only sarcastically need a diagram of where not to pet a bear. It's just not fair, they're so cute and furry, they should be my friends.

 

Earlier this week a bear walked into a small Russian village and mauled a 14 yr old girl to death.

Bears look cute, they are beautiful but like many wild animals should not be approached.

The girl had extremely bad luck that the bear walked into the streets.

 

 

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4 hours ago, kristof65 said:

On a semi related note, that's what I expected Kangaroos to feel like, I was really surprised to find out they're soft, like cats or rabbits. 
 

 

I could have told you that...  

(My father picked up a Kangaroo skin in Australia way back in the 60s when he worked on freighters. and he still have it up on a wall)

Edited by Gadgetman!
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41 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:

 

I could have told you that...  

(My father picked up a Kangaroo skin in Australia way back in the 60s when he worked on freighters. and he still have it up on a wall)

I was surprised about kangaroos as well most of them were very soft and fluffy.  I would have expected very coarse hair.  Koala bears on the other hand were very coarse furred and felt like Petting a brillo pad.  Nature doing what nature loves best:  denying expectations

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6 hours ago, strawhat said:

 

We've met. 

1886648121_4x6DSC04140.JPG.3ae05760211c80e188bd083441bc6a71.JPG

We went to SD in '16.

 

We stayed in Hill City (off season), so there wasn't a whole lot to do but we were mostly just getting out of town.  We are hoping to take the granddaughter to the roundup next season.  She's got a weird thing for bison.

 

That’s a mule, surely?

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13 minutes ago, Kangaroorex said:

I was surprised about kangaroos as well most of them were very soft and fluffy.  I would have expected very coarse hair.  Koala bears on the other hand were very coarse furred and felt like Petting a brillo pad.  Nature doing what nature loves best:  denying expectations

 

I would be careful petting a koala, the majority of wild koalas carry chlamydia, and since they pee over themselves you might pick that up from them.

So eventhought they look awfully cute I wouldn't touch one unless I was wearing gloves.

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My mother locked us out of a house in the wooded mountains of Pennsylvania once when I was maybe five or six.

 

I saw a black animal that looked like a bear in the distance and pounded on the door begging her to let us in. 

 

She wouldn’t, so my little sister and I hid in the woodshed the rest of the day.

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I'm sorry to be blunt here (it must be my inner ranger/druid coming out), but if you get injured by a wild animal I don't really have much sympathy for you. My first thought upon hearing such a story is 'What did the human do?' Every wild animal I've ever encountered wanted nothing more than to get away from me; given any sort of chance, the animal is going to run away. (Mama protecting babies is a different story, obviously)

Children get more sympathy from me; my ire goes to the idiot parents for not teaching the child that wild animals can be dangerous, and/or not supervising the child closely enough to keep it safe.

Stories like the one Glitterwolf mentioned are tragic all around. As we keep taking away natural areas for animals to live in, things like that are going to keep happening, and it's not the animals fault.

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2 hours ago, Pingo said:

 

8 hours ago, strawhat said:

 

We've met. 

1886648121_4x6DSC04140.JPG.3ae05760211c80e188bd083441bc6a71.JPG

We went to SD in '16.

 

We stayed in Hill City (off season), so there wasn't a whole lot to do but we were mostly just getting out of town.  We are hoping to take the granddaughter to the roundup next season.  She's got a weird thing for bison.

 

That’s a mule, surely?

 

Close. It is a feral Donkey wanting a handout from people (in Wyoming, cf. just below).

 

9 hours ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

At Custer State Park in Wyoming , near Yellowstone, they have a very large herd of Bison.

The herd is large enough that they actually have to have a roundup and cull every year.

Haven't been there during the roundup but have been there about two weeks before, when most of the beasties are hiding in the tall timber.

They are musty dusty creatures, somewhat bad tempered, and the people who have been chased and tossed recently got off easy and lucky.

If you ever have the opportunity to acquire a Bison Robe/Blanket do so.  When properly tanned the fur is incredibly soft and warm and once you've experienced one you can understand why these large beasties are able to endure harsh winter conditions.

 

If you ever do get up that way, watch out for the 4 legged panhandlers, those being the donkey herd, descendants of stock originally brought into the region during the Black Hills Gold Rush.

GEM

 

It was in the last paragraph of GEM’s Wyoming travelogue post that was otherwise mostly about semi-domesticated Bison. 

 

Sylverthorne made responses to both sections of GEM’s post. But she mentioned South Dakota..? :huh:

 

Edited by TGP
WY ? SD ?
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