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Froggy the Great

Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

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32 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:

Cows are actually pretty intelligent.

 

I think it depends on the breed. 

 

Longhorns are worrisome, for instance. 

The cows my niece used to trick with pop-tarts were not clever beasts. 

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11 minutes ago, TGP said:

 

I think it depends on the breed. 

 

Longhorns are worrisome, for instance. 

The cows my niece used to trick with pop-tarts were not clever beasts. 

 

I'm mostly used to Norwegian Red, and some Hereford and Charolais, so wouldn't know. 

The Hereford and NRF are probably about the same when it comes to intelligence, and the Charolais seems a bit slower on the uptake. 

(They're by no means dumb, though. Also, they're pretty gentle for being such big lumps of meat)

 

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8 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:
26 minutes ago, TGP said:

 

I think it depends on the breed. 

 

Longhorns are worrisome, for instance. 

The cows my niece used to trick with pop-tarts were not clever beasts. 

 

I'm mostly used to Norwegian Red, and some Hereford and Charolais, so wouldn't know. 

The Hereford and NRF are probably about the same when it comes to intelligence, and the Charolais seems a bit slower on the uptake. 

(They're by no means dumb, though. Also, they're pretty gentle for being such big lumps of meat)

 

Hereford always seemed pretty smart. We used to raise Brafords, way back when, which were a mix of Hereford and Brahman, and, now, boy, them suckers was downright devious. Kindly tended toward mean sometimes, too, as I've always been told the Brahmans will do, but the Brafords'd up and surprise you now and then with how clever they could be. Generally to your disadvantage.

 

I really kinda don't miss having castle to tend lol.

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1 hour ago, Gadgetman! said:

 

Cows are actually pretty intelligent. And you can teach them stuff. Sure, mostly stuff that they have an advantage of learning, but still.

(In open plan dairy farms with free-range cows it doesn't take very long for the cws to learn to use the feeder or the milking machine. Most even learn that going to the feeder many times in a short time doesn't result in more food. )

the reason mot people think they're stupid is that they often just doesn't give a darn. 

 

I was about to argue, then I saw the important bit, "dairy".

I grew up on a beef farm (mostly shorthorn with some angus).  Beef cattle are not smart.  Smart in no way improves dealing with or handling beef cattle. Dumb as a post is generally much more helpful. 

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5 minutes ago, Jasper_the_2nd said:

Beef cattle are not smart.  Smart in no way improves dealing with or handling beef cattle. Dumb as a post is generally much more helpful

Those pop-tart munching critters belonged to my niece’s father-in-law and they were beef cattle. 

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Speaking of critters and relative intelligence, my sister recently got a second puppy (to keep Chip, the first one, occupied, since he's a right bundle of energy), and she is adorable and an absolute sweetheart, but she doesn't quite...understand how to dog. 

 

Bean knows that toys are a thing, but puzzles over their purpose. You can pick up a ball and she gets excited, but you throw it and she just looks around very confused and a bit concerned. She always runs outside when Chip does, but then stops short when she realizes she's suddenly outside, and how on earth did she get out here? Her general expression is one of amiable befuddlement, and training her is proving to be interesting (she starts to do something, then apparently forgets what she's doing partway through).

 

Very much a sweet little thing and very snuggly, but it's difficult to not laugh at her adorable confusion. 

 

Huzzah! 

--OneBoot :D 

Edited by OneBoot
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3 hours ago, NebulousMissy said:

Grrrrrr... :grr:

 

I had to inform my boss yesterday that yes my doctor LOST some necessary paperwork and now I have to resubmit it AGAIN. Paperwork that technically my work required I have turned in Friday of last week. I have a fresh copy and I will be hand-delivering it to the FMLA coordinator of the hospital. If that doesn't get it done I don't know what will.

 

This is the medical paperwork I need to even APPLY for the advanced sick leave I'll need for my surgery. Deadline to apply was 15 days out, IE last week.

 

I am not happy. I am not happy AT ALL.

Plan B:

If the paperwork isn't done posthaste your next call is to the Chief Administrator of the Hospital.

When you introduce yourself to the Secretary on the phone use something as follows:

"Good >appropriate time of day< my name is [insert name here] , I'm from the IRS and I'm calling on official business.

Note:  You are from the IRS and the business is official and connected to the IRS.  The fact that it isn't a tax matter but a paperwork foulup on the part of the hospital related to hospital services to be provided to an IRS Employee and paid for by the Employees, Employer Provided Insurance can be made clear during the conversation.

GEM

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I love this forum, I posted that pic with the dogs and cows because the dog just looked so happy.

Then we get pages discussing the average cow's intelligence.

I love you guys!::P:

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19 hours ago, Kangaroorex said:

I wouldn't be surprised if it was.  As @Doug Sundseth said electronics infant mortality is a significant risk.  But because there are so many of them and the individual potential risk is so low it is easier to just lot test and replace the failures free of charge.  Even components for safety systems: the rules for those require special monitoring and retesting for the first 6 months before they are completely trusted and brought on line.  These are for equipment that is suppose to have a defect rate of less than 1 in 10 million (in today's market that means a bad piece of equipment ever month in some cases.)  Even if you test every other device there is no guarantee that the 'other' device isn't going to fail on opening the box.

 

Now try telling that to someone who bought a 2 million dollar compresser.  I guarantee you will learn a few new words....

People who spend 1/20th to 1/40th of that are willing to teach you new words...

Credit card readers in the car wash industry tend to have a really short life span - 1-3 years on average.  This is because car washes are incredible harsh environments for electronics - lots of water, chemicals, blowing dirt, etc.  The company I contract to warranties new systems for 1 year, but after that, card readers only get a 90 day warranty.  And these aren't cheap card readers - they have to be built as tough as we can make them.  But they're just relatively inexpensive "wear" items of a much larger, more expensive system. 

So we had a site where the guy not only had card readers in all five self serve bays and all three automatics, he put them on all his vacuums - site had two dozen card readers overall.   His first card readers started failing about 24 months out, and started failing at a rate of 1-2 a month.  After about 6-8 months of this, he was screaming obscenities at us every time he had to buy a new one at $300-$400 each.  

Then he got "smart" and decided to start trying to claim they were warranty replacements for ones he had just bought - first couple slipped passed us because of the screaming, but when we started comparing serial numbers we realized what he was doing.  And then he really got mad, screaming about the $100k he had spent on the overall system, and that card readers should be more reliable and less expensive.   He finally got over his monthly tirades when we used our serial number tracking to show him that most of his card readers were lasting the expected 2-3 years, it was just that he had so many of them. 

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3 hours ago, Kangaroorex said:

 

For myself, I will play just about anything (not a fan of Goth stuff like Vampire or wraith or JRPG on paper but that's because I just don't like the setting) they are usually not that hard to learn and if everyone is doing it right, its about the story not the mechanics of the game system.  That said, I am old enough to not want to keep learning new systems so if you want me to run a game of fantasy; its going to be either pathfinder V1, Adnd, or DnD3.5.  These are systems I know and I am familiar enough with to pickup and just run.  I don't really want to spend the time to learn the new systems to the depth I am comfortable at running them, they just aren't different enough.

 

>snippage<

 

But at the end of it, the system doesn't really matter, its what you are comfortable with.  I have played in games of 4e that were a lot of fun, I have played games of pathfinder that were a slog.  what really matters is that everyone agrees to the rules and to the tale you are spinning together.  I get far more annoyed at players who must use every rule they can find to make their character 'the best' or goes looking for maxed out builds on the interwebs.  To me, those people are playing the wrong game. 

I've found the only effective solution to be a DM, backed up by the other players, willing to declare "House Rules" and disallow game breaking combinations, no matter what the published rules say.

Only exception to the above being under actual tournament rules and conditions.

GEM

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*collapses into the forum near tears* I'm going to have to try and finish my entries at Reapercon. My mother needs full time care and refuses to hire anyone and she is running me ragged. 

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3 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:

Players being rule orcs?

Shouldn't they be playing 40K or something, instead?

 

No, just being supportive of the DMs method of dealing with the one dork who insists one being a Rules Lawyer.

GEM

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7 minutes ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

No, just being supportive of the DMs method of dealing with the one dork who insists one being a Rules Lawyer.

GEM

 

"Rules Lawyer" is a content-free ad hominem attack. It has so many meanings that it's entirely unclear what you're railing against other than people who play a game in a way you don't like.

 

Now some of those ways are toxic and entirely worthy of denunciation. Some of them are neutral but incompatible with the play style of the person making the complaint. And some of them are completely fair and all the fault lies with the complainer. Merely reciting the incantation "rules lawyer" is not really an argument, it's just an insult.

 

For context:

  • As a GM, I've more than once said, "We absolutely agree on what the rules say. But I think that rule makes for less fun at my table. I'm using a different rule. If that causes a problem for how you envision your character or his progression, let me know and we'll work out a rebuild."
  • As a player, I've argued that "X" is what the rules say, and at some length, too. Note that I'm perfectly willing to stop that argument if the GM says something like what I just mentioned, but for as long as the discussion is about what the written rules actually mean rather than what rules we're going to play with at the table, I'll continue until convinced that I'm misreading.

(Note that if I were to find a house rule to be fun ruining, I'd walk away from the game. But that's no different than if I find a written rule, group dynamic, or GM fun ruining.)

 

This is all a part of my fundamental conception (at least in games where such discussions are likely to arise) that an RPG is a game (it's part of the name, after all) and games have rules. And rules need to be followed or explicitly changed.

 

Storytelling-style games tend not to have those discussions at all, for a variety of reasons revolving around the way that they're written and the social contract agreed to (at least implicitly) by the kind of people who play them. FWIW, the next game I expect to GM is very much a system-light storytelling game. But it's not going to be run with Pathfinder, GURPS, HERO, or D&D rules.

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