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So the stars have aligned and Mudgullet has been released just in time for my group's Tomb of Annihilation playthrough.  I'm planning on going for a simple, suitably froghemoth-y color scheme but have realized that my palette is lacking in the greens department.  Oh, no! ::o:

 

So, time to remedy this.  What should I grab from the MSP and Bones paint lines to give me a good selection of greens, while limiting the number of colors I need to buy (maybe 3-5 bottles this purchase)?  What are some of the colors you folk tend to reach for, with an eye towards versatility?  The Power Palette is only as good as the swatches it pulls from, and it's been my experience that Reapers paint swatches are very hit or miss, unfortunately.

 

Thanks!

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Viper green is my favorite bright green.  Muddy Green for the olives, Highlands Moss for a blue green, and Brilliant green for a good all around mid green.  From that you can mix pretty much anything by adding whites, blacks, and other shades.  Clear Green wouldn't hurt since is it pure green pigment and can be used to adjust any mix toward green (all the clears are essential for mixing and glazing if you ask me).

 

If you can't get them all, I'd get them in this order (given that you mix your shades):

 

1. Viper Green

2. Brilliant Green

3. Muddy Green

4. Clear Green

5. Highlands Moss

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I'd generally agree with Talespinner, but I may swap Viper Green for Leaf Green - it has better coverage. Viper Green is brighter though, but almost requires an undercoat of something like Brilliant Green first. 

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I really have enjoyed the greens from the Dungeon Dwellers Monster Color Set.

 

Troll Hide

Orc Skin 

Gnoll Pelt

 

 

 

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Thanks for the suggestions.  The Brilliant Greens triad is lovely, but has a bit of a "not found in nature" quality to it.  When you're looking for a more subdued look for things like vegetation, do you have any quick mixing recipes to cut back on the, well, brilliance?

 

Also, when highlighting green areas, are there any colors that are particularly suitable to use either straight up or mix with the base color?  Like a particular shade of yellow or something?

 

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49 minutes ago, Dr_Automaton said:

Thanks for the suggestions.  The Brilliant Greens triad is lovely, but has a bit of a "not found in nature" quality to it.  When you're looking for a more subdued look for things like vegetation, do you have any quick mixing recipes to cut back on the, well, brilliance?

 

Also, when highlighting green areas, are there any colors that are particularly suitable to use either straight up or mix with the base color?  Like a particular shade of yellow or something?

 

 

White if you want a minty green look, yellow if you want a more natural look.  A basic yellow should suffice, but if you decide to experiment then remember that "yellow" and "white" can also include various tan colours.  Generally if you're going for a natural look then a pure yellow will do the job, just add it to whatever green and work up.  It will usually take quite a lot of yellow before it will stop looking green so you have a good amount of wiggle room.  Using white with green will tend to lighten much faster so you need to be more careful with how much you add.  But yellow is very forgiving.  

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These are some basic color recipes. I mix mine from artists paints, but where the following applies to Reaper paints I have included them in parentheses.

 

Whites added to greens to lighten them skew them towards the blue. Bright yellows can make them look metallic and harsh. Earthy brown yellows can dull them. All these might be effects you want. But if you want to keep in the generally same color perception when lightening greens my favorite color to lighten them is a sort of creamy pale yellow color mixed from Titanium White and Yellow Ochre (Reaper’s Linen White might be close).

 

If you’re willing to mix colors yourself Phthalocyanine Green (Reaper’s Clear Viridian if you can find it; Clear Green has a more yellowish cast) is an excellent and very strong transparent pure peacock green pigment that can make pretty much any green you would ever need. 

 

Mix Phthalo Green with Titanium White (Reaper Pure White) to make a blueish verdigris copper corrosion.

 

Mix Phthalo Green with Burnt Sienna (Chestnut Brown) to make a highly natural dark leaf green. Temper that with white and you get a sage green which makes a very natural-looking green skin tone. Lighten it instead with a Hansa Yellow Opaque (a bright lemony yellow; I don’t know the Reaper equivalent) and you get a natural looking lighter spring green foliage color. Lighten it with Yellow Ochre or Mars Yellow (Palomino Gold) and you get a more earthy light green. 

 

Mix with Hansa Yellow Opaque (bright lemon yellow; don’t know the Reaper equivalent) to make an eye-watering acid green which can look near fluorescent. Lighten that with white and you’ll get a pale chartreuse suitable for glowing eyes, computer screens, etc.

 

Mix with Yellow Ochre or Mars Yellow to make a sort of dull natural green. 

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