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Jordan Peacock

80034 Weapons Locker (for scatter terrain)

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robco_storage_unit_by_jordangreywolf_dcz

 

Reaper Miniatures #80034 "Weapons Locker" -- plastic terrain piece (variable scale, used here for 32mm) -- painted up as a RobCo-labeled storage unit, as a barricade or objective for Fallout-themed post-apocalyptic games. 

The original model is hollow (and is fashioned in such a way that it probably wouldn't be that difficult to cut the lid open), but I just sealed up the bottom with a piece of mat board and decided to paint it up whole ... this time.  (Now that I've painted the one, I'm thinking the next time I have an opportunity to grab one on sale, I may grab a couple more, and open up at least one and fill it with robo-junk.)

I painted the whole thing dark brown as a base, then spackled it with Burnt Sienna, Pumpkin Orange, and King's Gold for rust effects initially.

However, an entire container that's JUST rusty is kind of dull.  I mean, it looked sort of okay, but there wasn't so much as a hint of paint peeling off, and that just didn't feel right.

So, I went back and spackled it AGAIN with Graphite Gray and Moss Green (for deteriorating paint).  I thought to myself that what it REALLY could use would be some sort of logo.  At first I was thinking of a military logo, but I wasn't quite sure if the structure was plausible as military.  So, I decided to go through a few different fictitious logos and see what I might be able to paint on it free-hand (this "corrugated" surface wouldn't lend itself to my printed paper "label" shortcuts -- and, besides, that'd undo all my effort on the "rust" look).  In the end, I roughed out a RobCo logo (Dolphin Gray), then added some grunge (washed Graphite Gray and whatever was scraped up from the bottom of the paintbrush water cup). 

Voila!  Grungy container with barely legible logo on it.

 

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Not to detract from the weapons locker, which is very nice, but can we also take a moment to appreciate the magazine cover that the guy is holding in his hand? And scattered around his base? How cool is that?!?!

 

Very nicely done all around, sir.

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1 hour ago, ManvsMini said:

Not to detract from the weapons locker, which is very nice, but can we also take a moment to appreciate the magazine cover that the guy is holding in his hand? And scattered around his base? How cool is that?!?!

 

 

Thanks!  The guy is a Reaper mini as well, though one that doesn't appear to be in the Reaper store: S2P80003 "Deadlands: Hell on Earth - Librarian (male)" (from the "Deadlands: Hell on Earth" Kickstarter a few years back), sculpted by Bob Ridolfi.  Normally the figure is holding some sort of "data pad," but I modified with some cardstock so he's holding a jumbo-sized edition of "Tesla" magazine.

 

The pallets are from Warsenal (mini-kits of laser-cut MDF and acrylic).  The street itself is made from Secret Weapon Miniatures Tablescapes "Urban Streets (damaged)" terrain tiles.  The junky car is a McDonald's Happy Meal "Pixar Cars" toy from 2006 (minus the windshield/eye piece, and with some putty to "flatten" the tires).  The robot to the right is a Brother Vinni resin model (Flybot).

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That really is a SPLENDID looking piece. The weathering & rust are particularly nicely done. Post Apocalypse has a lot of appeal for me; that appeal has gotten greater with all your OUTSTANDING work.

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Glorious weathering and setting as ever! I never tire of these beautifully rusted and abraded terrain pieces, and the details bring it to life.

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On 2/9/2019 at 7:44 AM, KruleBear said:

Very cool. The peeling green paint is a nice contrast to the orange rust. 

 

Thanks!  One thing I've got to do one of these days is to figure out how to do REAL peeling paint.  It's the sort of thing I can occasionally do by accident, but never on demand.  I know there's some kind of method that involves first painting a model all rusty-looking, then putting some salt (?) grains on it, spray-on hair fixative, then spray-painting it some outer color, and then deliberately breaking the resulting area where the paint is bulged out by the salt grains, or something like that. 

 

I also remember a long time ago, in the fabric store I could get "crackle paint" medium: it was a brush-on "paint" that was sold in the same section as the craft acrylics, and the idea was that you'd paint it whatever color you wanted to show through the cracks, then paint a layer of this clear "crackle paint" medium over that, and then when that dried, paint an outer layer of paint over THAT, and when that dried, it should shrink and crackle, I guess because the medium did something to the surface that messed with the outer paint.  I actually had some, but it was the sort of thing best used for LARGE and fairly flat areas (not useful on the scale of a single typical miniature, or even small terrain pieces), but I wonder if it would have worked for something as large and solid as the Weapons Locker or Shipping Container.

 

I suppose if I were really determined, I could paint SEVERAL layers of acrylic over a flat surface, then deliberately distress it, and if the acrylic was applied thickly enough, I'd probably end up with a layer sturdy enough to be peeled back a bit.

 

Hmm.  Now that I think about it, I wonder if I might not be able to do something that borrows something of the spirit of the "salt and hair spray" method, but with pieces of scrap paper or plastic.  Basically, I'd paint things rusty (as usual) but then stick some piece of thin plastic scrap onto the surface (not glued, but allowed to just get stuck there by the paint? -- or, hey, maybe hair spray) and deliberately paint the "outer coating" all around it, and thickly.  Then, go back with a fingernail and tear out the scrap that's buried in the paint.  If I applied the outer "coat" of acrylic thickly enough, I ought to get some paint "tearing" at the edges.  I guess the trick would be whether I'd end up destroying the underlying "rust" effect as well in the process.

 

I suppose I could try experimenting on a piece of scrap plastic and see what comes of it.  (And, hey, if I end up with a rusty, paint-peeling piece of scrap plastic, I could probably actually work it into something -- such as a junk wall barricade.  :D  )

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16 hours ago, Jordan Peacock said:

 

Thanks!  One thing I've got to do one of these days is to figure out how to do REAL peeling paint.  It's the sort of thing I can occasionally do by accident, but never on demand.  I know there's some kind of method that involves first painting a model all rusty-looking, then putting some salt (?) grains on it, spray-on hair fixative, then spray-painting it some outer color, and then deliberately breaking the resulting area where the paint is bulged out by the salt grains, or something like that. 

 

I also remember a long time ago, in the fabric store I could get "crackle paint" medium: it was a brush-on "paint" that was sold in the same section as the craft acrylics, and the idea was that you'd paint it whatever color you wanted to show through the cracks, then paint a layer of this clear "crackle paint" medium over that, and then when that dried, paint an outer layer of paint over THAT, and when that dried, it should shrink and crackle, I guess because the medium did something to the surface that messed with the outer paint.  I actually had some, but it was the sort of thing best used for LARGE and fairly flat areas (not useful on the scale of a single typical miniature, or even small terrain pieces), but I wonder if it would have worked for something as large and solid as the Weapons Locker or Shipping Container.

 

I suppose if I were really determined, I could paint SEVERAL layers of acrylic over a flat surface, then deliberately distress it, and if the acrylic was applied thickly enough, I'd probably end up with a layer sturdy enough to be peeled back a bit.

 

Hmm.  Now that I think about it, I wonder if I might not be able to do something that borrows something of the spirit of the "salt and hair spray" method, but with pieces of scrap paper or plastic.  Basically, I'd paint things rusty (as usual) but then stick some piece of thin plastic scrap onto the surface (not glued, but allowed to just get stuck there by the paint? -- or, hey, maybe hair spray) and deliberately paint the "outer coating" all around it, and thickly.  Then, go back with a fingernail and tear out the scrap that's buried in the paint.  If I applied the outer "coat" of acrylic thickly enough, I ought to get some paint "tearing" at the edges.  I guess the trick would be whether I'd end up destroying the underlying "rust" effect as well in the process.

 

I suppose I could try experimenting on a piece of scrap plastic and see what comes of it.  (And, hey, if I end up with a rusty, paint-peeling piece of scrap plastic, I could probably actually work it into something -- such as a junk wall barricade.  :D  )

 

Vallejo Chipping Medium!

 

Paint something in the original colour.

Let Dry

Apply Chipping Medium.

Let dry for a few minutes.

Paint Rust all over.

Let dry.

 

Use an old WET toothbrush and start brushing on areas where you want the paint to come through the rust.

 

Instead of rust you can also use another colour, so the old paint is shown at areas through the new paint.

 

I recommend the Vallejo special effect set.

It has the chipping medium, old and new rust, verdigris, fresh and dried blood, vomit.

 

 

Edited by Glitterwolf
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5 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

 

Vallejo Chipping Medium!

 

Paint something in the original colour.

Let Dry

Apply Chipping Medium.

Let dry for a few minutes.

Paint Rust all over.

Let dry.

 

 

That sounds awesome (and I'll have to look into this), but it sounds slightly backwards, unless I misunderstand what the chipping medium *does*.  Wouldn't you paint the rust FIRST, then paint the "original color" OVER that?  The idea of the effect should suggest that the paint color is flaking away, and areas of metal that have been exposed underneath have turned rusty, so if the end effect has any depth at all, I'd expect the rust to go underneath.

Actually, thinking about this, I figure there ought to be some reviews or techniques out there, so I did a Google search.  I found a review here:

http://tibbsforge.com/vallejo-chipping-medium/

 

I may just have to try this.  Thanks for the pointer!  :)

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