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Resin nonsense CONTINUES!


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Hey!!!

I'm still fighting resin. Seriously, it might be winning.

 

I want to ask a hypothetical question and have y'all give me opinions.

Do you think a springform pan would work for a mold into which to pour resin?

I'm thinking yes, and it might have some nice, smooth sides too...... 

What does the collective think?!

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I'm just assuming here, but are you interested in using said pan solely for the smoothness of the sides? Or are you also looking at it so you don't have to use mold release, i.e. non-stick pan?

 

I can't imagine why it wouldn't work for smooth sides.

 

Is said pan Teflon-coated? You might not need a mold release agent if that is part of your goal, because Teflon is super nonreactive with a broad spectrum of chemicals. Only would be concerned if your casting resin uses some sort of metal catalyst (which casting resin are you using?). Mold release can still be used though.

 

If the coating is scratched, the resin will capture that detail.

 

Regardless, I personally wouldn't use the pan for food anymore. There are other ways to make a moldbox though, smooth sides and all.

 

2 hours ago, Pingo said:

Make sure the bottom of the pan is sealed. Also, does resin stick to metal? I am completely ignorant about the material.

 

The clear 5-minute epoxy resin from hardware stores is usable on metal, so perhaps? I typically roughed up the metal with sandpaper before I use it so it can grip. Never tried it on a smooth piece of metal. Or a Teflon-coated piece, for that matter.

Edited by ManvsMini
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I've done a fair bit of resin casting and silicone mold making at home. If you wanted to make the mold with the springform pan it should probably work. I'd check and see if it holds water (which I'd assume any cake pan would) and if it does you're good to go. If you want to pour resin into the pan I don't know. It might work but I can think of reasons why it might not. I'm not sure how well any mold release would work on a metal or teflon pan. Resin will glue itself pretty solid to almost anything. If it seeps into the joint areas it could glue the pan shut rock solid. You could test it with a small bit of resin, set the pan at an angle and just fill that corner a bit. It'd show you if the resin can be removed from the pan easily and it it gunks up the opening too much without putting so much in you get a permanent bond.

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For best results I'd say yes to the mold. I've only used clear resin a little bit for water effects that were poured on a base but the other stuff I use more (Smooth Cast 300 mostly) really sticks. I'm kind of sloppy when I'm working and I've had drops of resin permanently bond to my skin (even wearing gloves), the table (used a chisel to remove it) and other stuff that shouldn't have been close in the first place. I'd be worried that you'd never get it out of whatever you poured it in without damaging it and probably having to cut the mold in pieces. It's an extra expense but buying the small bottles or starter kits of something like Oomoo would be better. I'd stick with one of the silicones that uses two equal parts to make the mold. It's not too hard to make a simple one piece mold.

 

Are you planning to put things in the resin to look like they're under water? I've never tried that but think I'd be able to. It would add a fair bit of difficulty with having to make the mold around the diorama before pouring. A plain clear cylinder wouldn't be hard.

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3 hours ago, Marineal said:

I jsut want a cylinder that is about 4 inches wide and 3 inches tall and I'm having difficulty finding that. 

 

An option: go to the hardware store and buy a pvc pipe connector, a slip joint. They should have a 4" diameter size; my local Home Depot has a 5" for only $6, and they have sizes in 1"-5". You'll still need to use mold release on the inside, but the insides should be nice and smooth. You won't have the flex of the silicone rubber when it comes time to demold, but if you used the mold release it should be able to slip out.

 

dura-couplings-adaptors-slip-joint.thumb.jpg.28df03f8954e5bd79f554eaaece947cb.jpg

 

If you want to try this on a smaller scale to see if it will demold without issue, get a 1" connector and experiment on that. It should cost less than $1 at Home Depot or Lowes (one I bought a few months ago was $0.57).

 

You could also use it to mold the shape of your cylinder if you decide to use the silicone rubber.

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1 hour ago, ManvsMini said:

 

An option: go to the hardware store and buy a pvc pipe connector, a slip joint. They should have a 4" diameter size; my local Home Depot has a 5" for only $6, and they have sizes in 1"-5". You'll still need to use mold release on the inside, but the insides should be nice and smooth. You won't have the flex of the silicone rubber when it comes time to demold, but if you used the mold release it should be able to slip out.

 

dura-couplings-adaptors-slip-joint.thumb.jpg.28df03f8954e5bd79f554eaaece947cb.jpg

 

If you want to try this on a smaller scale to see if it will demold without issue, get a 1" connector and experiment on that. It should cost less than $1 at Home Depot or Lowes (one I bought a few months ago was $0.57).

 

You could also use it to mold the shape of your cylinder if you decide to use the silicone rubber.

.... well, I feel sheepish...

 

lol. wow!!! Thanks so much! That is a perfect idea!

 

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2 hours ago, Marineal said:

.... well, I feel sheepish...

 

Years of planned projects/dioramas/casting creates a repository of junk in my head. Glad it could help.

 

FYI, regarding the sizing of pvc pipe connectors, the inside diameter of a 4" connector will be greater than 4", because it accommodates the wall-thickness of a 4" pipe. Hope that isn't a huge issue. Look for Schedule 40 (vs 80), it will be cheaper and closer to 4" (schedule 80 has thicker walls, so an 80 connector will have a greater inside diameter).

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