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Mouse's First Bust (Advice and Comments Appreciated)


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So, I'm back. And I decided I needed to paint lots of skin. Recently watched the painting DVDs from Dark Sword, specifically the Marike ones. So I'm going to be trying to practice glazing.

 

Note: I know this bust won't be perfect. But this is me attempting to improve, so all advice and comments are appreciated!

 

Moving on, here is the bust in question, the beautiful maiden bust from Reapercon 2018. 

20190224_220538.thumb.jpg.cff6516c375c12599669394e33879d7e.jpg

 

And here is my progress this far:

20190227_172209.thumb.jpg.a16c54f6d8c1b491611ee9389399fb2f.jpg

 

So, I wanted to post this because it is relevant to the blending I'm doing. This is from the class I took from @Corporea last reapercon, with some blending with glazes attempted. 

 

I hadn't got this right at the con, and would love for that progress to be checked on here! I'm going for high contrast, but not as high as here, so I thought this would be a better way to get some judgement on blending.

15513067215031782888979610862079.thumb.jpg.23efec7db64877107aff7bc8d9cf642d.jpg

I seem to be losing a lot of contrast in the process, and would like some advice on what I might be doing wrong. 

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1 minute ago, Clearman said:

I really like the purple at the edges.

 

Not sure from the pictures, but in the second, the flesh color looks chunky.  Like either the paint wasn't thin enough, or it wasn't dry before hitting it with the brush again.

Yeah - it was still wet. Impatient mouse. I tried to clean it up using some gloss sealer, but I guess it wasn't quite enough.

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Here with completed blending of that cheek. That took so many layers that I think I might have to simple green her and restart.15513170531312753587362676392604.thumb.jpg.0e6a57c36e0f565bf7a8bf0539de9626.jpg

Also, the cheek is still somehow not fully blended, but I dont know what I'm missing and I spilled my rosy skin and...I'm done for the night.

Having to add back the midtone was my curse. My shaky hands caused the violet shadow to go all over the place on her face.

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Nice!

 

When painting busts especially with a lot of skin, you might want to try glazing.

You will first paint shadows, midtone and highlights.

Those will look a bit harsh on such a big object.

 

Then you will make a glaze out of the midtone colour.

Almost as thin as water.

Apply a layer and let dry.

Add layers till you're satisfied.

 

This can be timeconsuming.

The idea is that the glaze is thin, after a few layers it will downtone the harshness of the shadows/highlight and blend it all in.

Since you're using thin glazes and let every layer dry, you can stop in time.

Should it become too dull then you would need to reapply a highlight/shadow sometimes, but usually this is a good way to create a nice smooth skin.

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

Nice!

 

When painting busts especially with a lot of skin, you might want to try glazing.

You will first paint shadows, midtone and highlights.

Those will look a bit harsh on such a big object.

 

Then you will make a glaze out of the midtone colour.

Almost as thin as water.

Apply a layer and let dry.

Add layers till you're satisfied.

 

This can be timeconsuming.

The idea is that the glaze is thin, after a few layers it will downtone the harshness of the shadows/highlight and blend it all in.

Since you're using thin glazes and let every layer dry, you can stop in time.

Should it become too dull then you would need to reapply a highlight/shadow sometimes, but usually this is a good way to create a nice smooth skin.

 

 

 

That's what I was trying to do, I'm just truly terrible at glazing. I ended up at that result after glazing shadows, it just ended up being way to many layers of glaze to balance everything and I ended up spreading into my midtone. I cant figure out what I'm missing with the glazes.

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34 minutes ago, Paradoxical Mouse said:

I cant figure out what I'm missing with the glazes.

 

How wet is your brush when you apply a glaze?  The way I glaze, the paint is water thin like Glitterwolf described, and then I wick off all the moisture on a paper towel.  This leave just trace amount of pigment that then get applied to the model.  The color shift is almost imperceptible with each layer, and it can take 3-4 layers before you notice anything changing.  You must also wait until one layer is completely dry before applying the next, so glazing is very time consuming.  I usually work on two different areas to give the other time to dry, or if I'm working on a small area, I use a hair drier.

 

Don't be afraid to also switch back and forth between your shadow, mid-tone, and highlight colors to make corrections as you go. 

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Out of curiosity, are you using anything besides water to thin your glazes?  I find flesh tones to be really hard to keep smooth unless you use some medium to help with the thinning.  Honestly, usually I'm lazy and use a little brush on sealer with my water.  It will also make it easier to do the blending because you'll have more transparent paint to work with.  

 

You might also find Kuro Cleanbrush's videos helpful, he did one on blending, for example.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oa-_tMbRBE

 

It might not seem like NMM tutorials make sense for working on skin, but he does some great stuff on blending and layering that applies to anything.  

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59 minutes ago, LittleBluberry said:

Out of curiosity, are you using anything besides water to thin your glazes?  I find flesh tones to be really hard to keep smooth unless you use some medium to help with the thinning.  Honestly, usually I'm lazy and use a little brush on sealer with my water.  It will also make it easier to do the blending because you'll have more transparent paint to work with.  

 

You might also find Kuro Cleanbrush's videos helpful, he did one on blending, for example.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oa-_tMbRBE

 

It might not seem like NMM tutorials make sense for working on skin, but he does some great stuff on blending and layering that applies to anything.  

I've been using wash medium to thin them. I found that using water caused them to dry too quickly on the brush to glaze. 

 

4 hours ago, Clearman said:

 

How wet is your brush when you apply a glaze?  The way I glaze, the paint is water thin like Glitterwolf described, and then I wick off all the moisture on a paper towel.  This leave just trace amount of pigment that then get applied to the model.  The color shift is almost imperceptible with each layer, and it can take 3-4 layers before you notice anything changing.  You must also wait until one layer is completely dry before applying the next, so glazing is very time consuming.  I usually work on two different areas to give the other time to dry, or if I'm working on a small area, I use a hair drier.

 

Don't be afraid to also switch back and forth between your shadow, mid-tone, and highlight colors to make corrections as you go. 

 

I'll take pictures of my glaze on paper tonight when I paint. Maybe that'll help things? I was using 4 different colors to try to glaze in partial steps, since my base and my full shadow are so far apart.

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Something that took me a while to realize, not just for glazing but brush control in general, is that the direction you move your brush in relation to the colors already applied makes a big difference.  I.e, when you lift your brush, that is where most of the paint will be deposited.  So when blending/glazing, you want to move the brush toward the color you have on the brush.  I hope that makes sense.

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I second what Clearman has been saying. 

 

I "glaze" anywhere from super thin glazes, to fat glazes. I think it helps to think of them as just super thin layers. Sometimes I want to change the consistency of the layer, with a medium (glaze medium, thinner medium, or somesuch). Sometimes just water. On average, I fat glaze in multiple steps. I almost always will test a brush load on a piece of paper or cardstock (flashcards!) before taking it to the figure. Dip brush in paint, blot brush on towel (with a twirl), test a stripe on the paper, then go to the figure. That way I know exactly how much paint I'll deposit on the stroke. 

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