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Getting to know you March 2019 brought to you by Glitterwolf


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15 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

March 13th.

What was your favorite toy from your childhood?

Legos

Lincoln Logs

Micronauts

Star Wars figures

GI Joe figures

Tim Mee army men

Hot Wheels

 

I'm also part of the 'sticks can be anything' crowd.

 

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9 hours ago, Keianna said:

 

Not exactly a toy, but my very favorite thing was a rolling cart that my mother got me for a birthday. It was filled with my very own hobby supplies, glue scissors, jewelery makings and more. I still love that she did it and will never forget, even though I think she did it mostly to keep me from stealing her good sewing scissors. 

Oh, that's an excellent idea! :makes a note: hmmm... maybe I should have a notebook to write some of this parenting advice in...

 

1 hour ago, Sibling said:

(because dolls are freaky but teddy bears are fine)

Yes. Totally! I dressed up my teddy bears ALL the time! They're also nicer to hug. 

 

Here is my Winnie-the-Pooh. The bear that started a life long desire to hug a real bear.

 

IMG_2247.thumb.JPG.0e17eef509a15f42c1086241285738a8.JPG

He's a little balder than when I first got him, and as you can see, my efforts to repair his face left him with uh, character. He's not the first thing I'd go to save from a fire anymore, but he's high on the list. I'd definitely store him in a fire safe.

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1 hour ago, TGP said:

 

It helps to BE an engineer if you wind up assisting a kid (such as a wee little first cousin) build a Lego® Star Wars® Spaceship. 

 

Those things come with TECHNICAL MANUALS !  There is way more effort put into the instructions for a Lego® kit than I ever saw in a Monogram or Airfix kit. 

 

As a tech writer, I can tell you that those manuals are often used as examples of how to build a language-independent process instruction.

 

They're also really expensive to write and print.

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1 hour ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

As a tech writer, I can tell you that those manuals are often used as examples of how to build a language-independent process instruction.

 

They're also really expensive to write and print.

 

yes.  my  4 yr old, can assemble even complicated buildings using the wordless manuals.  they are really well done. 

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I love the lego manuals. Every time I have to put something else together, I feel like I should send a lego manual to the folks who've made whatever impossible to follow manual I'm currently using. Like "here! Study this! Do this!"

 

I feel like being a lego engineer has to be the best engineering job ever. 

Edited by redambrosia
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19 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

March 13th.

What was your favorite toy from your childhood?

 

Probably my plastic Triceratops- I took Mr T everywhere with me. He wasn't particularly big or fancy but I changed his colours on an almost weekly basis (poster paints are awesome) 

 

I grew up next to the sea, so one of my favourite things in the world was to gather up Mr T, a bucket, our dog and my net-on-a-stick and head down the rocky shore to see what was left in the rock pools when the tide went out. All manners of crustaceans and fish were caught, examined and carefully returned from whence they came. 

 

My family eventually moved away from that village, but I went back a few years ago and I realized that I still remembered which rock pools that had all the good stuff in them. Even better, I could now pick up the heavy rocks to see what was underneath :)

 

 

 

 

 

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Right, more serious answers....

 

2 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

March 14th:

Your cellphone and PC can do almost everything these days, which gadget from the past do you miss?

I miss having a personal chronometer with the capability to keep track of time based solely on its own internal resources. 

 

I have a microwave, a TV, a shelf clock, a PC, and several mobile devices all of which can act as clocks. But all of them depend on having electrical power, all are digital, some depend on connecting back to a network of some kind, that network (radio towers or internet routers) in turn depends on either GPS satellites or an atomic clock somewhere. All these dependencies.  Should any one link in the dependency chain fail, my inner caveman and I have no clue what time it is. 

 

 

2 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

March 14th:

Your cellphone and PC can do almost everything these days, which [...] thing your phone and PC can do, do you like best?

 

I get a kick out of wandering around everywhere with the feeling I am acting out StarTrek in real life.  I had a flip phone, when those were a thing, and they were so much like Kirk’s Communicator (just less capable in terms of range). And now I have a Smart(aleck) Phone. It looks vaguely like those data padds all TNG characters were wandering around with but it has capabilities like Spock’s tricorder (it can haul in info about almost anything, it can record visuals, audio, or both in video form, it can store new information that I gather). Again, it is less capable by a few orders of magnitude than its fictional counterpart but it is real and functional. 

 

A little bit of StarTrek became reality, in my lifetime. That’s the thing I like best.

 

 

Edited by TGP
...I just need a hand phaser...
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3 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

March 14th.

Your cellphone and PC can do almost everything these days, which gadget from the past do you miss / which  thing your phone and PC can do, do you like best?

Hmm gadget from the past that I miss...  I'm not sure but I think having the various gadgets be different objects, while sometimes annoying, was also useful if 1 thing broke, not only could you likely fix it (I re-soldered the headphone jack connection in my old Sony Walkman when it came loose) and your other tech was still available.  Now, if your phone dies, you've lost your music, movies, games, time piece, etc...  

 

And to be completely contrarian with myself, I also like that all those things are now 1 and I only need to worry about carrying one thing around.  I know, I have problems.  ::D: 

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6 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

March 14th.

Your cellphone and PC can do almost everything these days, which gadget from the past do you miss / which  thing your phone and PC can do, do you like best?

 

Can't think of a gadget that is gone that I miss. As to what is best about computers (construed broadly), I'd say constant access to a dictionary and encyclopedia is the best, with GPS a close second/third.

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6 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

March 14th.

Your cellphone and PC can do almost everything these days, which gadget from the past do you miss / which  thing your phone and PC can do, do you like best?

Grammar. :D

The main thing I miss isn't a gadget (I hate gadgets in general), it's that things are no longer designed to be repaired and maintained. Disposable culture is a blight, and one of many horrific effects of capitalism that everyone seems to ignore.

The thing I currently like best about the phone gadget is Google Translate, being able to read something written in another language in near-real or real time is still pretty astounding. Also having a minimap at all times is helpful, though just because I like minimaps, not because I had a need for one (I've always been good with navigation without technology, though a compass helps when it's overcast).

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I'm a bit torn about it.

On the one hand we have everything in the palm of our hand, camera, calculator navigator, phone, internet access etc.

But on the other hand like it has been mentioned before, when one thing is broken the whole package might become useless.

 

And as @CashWiley mentioned, it is all very disposable.

I try to hold on to a phone as long as possible, but it reaches a point when things are so slow or outdated that we HAVE to buy a new one.

I feel this is a deliberate ploy by the manufacturers.

Never had this trouble with the old Nokia...

I would prefer that cellphones would last longer.

 

I do love the tech behind it. Star Trek coming to life like @TGP said is indeed kinda awesome.

I did like to have a calculator though. i guess that's my gadget I miss a bit.

 

 

 

 

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