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torrenofamber

Anyone had a t.i.a ?

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Howdy all,

I just had a T.I.A. and wondered if anyone else has had one and what was your recovery like?   I am curious as to what changed after having one and did you views on things change afterward? 

I was just getting back into painting minis again and now this happens and I don't know if I can get back into it as fast as I was..

Thanks in advance.

D

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My mother had one about 5 years ago. It took her ability to do math, her ability to cook (she didn't believe that one for months), and her ability to feel pain in one foot. Since she had chronic major pain in that particular foot she considers it a general gain.

 

She's regained basic arithmetic through the use of those brain games websites. She doesn't want to regain too much, she has nightmares of regaining her foot pain. She's on aspirin therapy and that's about it.

 

People tend to do their own cooking now, which given my dad and brother are on different diets ordered by different doctors (one's on a diet to control blood sugar and kidney stones, one's on a diet to control cholesterol) just makes sense.

 

Having observed her recovery for three years before I moved out...

 

Just take it slow. It's your recovery. You might lose random things, you might lose nothing, you might get an unexpected loss that happens to be an odd gain. These things can be amazingly random. Follow your doctor's advice and once they give the go-ahead you can slowly explore to see if anything's missing.

 

I hope your recovery goes well.

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As a dovetail to what Missy said, I've seen loads of patients with TIAs and CVAs alike. Where there is one, there is the high probability of more. Now is the time to make healthy changes to your diet and lifestyle in order to reduce your overall chances of recurrence. My grandmother had a series of both events, and with each infarct, whether sustained or resolved, there is the opportunity for more damage. Follow your MD's plan and monitor your own weaknesses or changes. Try writing things down in terms of date/time you notice changes be they positive or negative. Above all; get up, get active, lose weight and eat healthy!

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Hi,

I'm sorry to hear you have suffered through one of these.  I had one about 10 years ago, it was frightening, and unfortunately untreated at the time due to insurance (or lack of).  I had about 50% blindness that took about a week to come back to about 90% vision and it has improved over the years, but I still have a small blind spot.  The confusion, brain fog, trouble articulating, and memory loss took months and years to work through.  I was extremely lucky that it was not worse.  My first diagnosis was 'brain tumor', so when we found out it was a TIA it was a relief. 

 

If you want to paint, do it.  Time will pass whether you are practicing or not.  You will heal. Your brain will learn new ways of doing things if you keep trying.  It's not about being fast, just keep at it. 

 

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Thank you all for the replies.  It happened, well I went to the ER Thursday late night.  I live alone and thankfully my buddy was talking to me or I would be in really trouble.  I am still finding out things.  I have my Dr appt Monday and then my Neurologist Tuesday so, I'm hoping for more answers then. 

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I'm glad to hear you were lucky enough to get quick treatment!  Everyone else has much better advice about recovery and health options, just wanted to let you know that lots of people here struggle with either motor skills (shaking, etc.) or vision difficulties and there are quite a few tricks to compensate for physical frailties.  Once you're feeling better and know what you're working with you'll probably be able to find some helpful suggestions.  

 

Best wishes for a speedy recovery!

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6 minutes ago, LittleBluberry said:

I'm glad to hear you were lucky enough to get quick treatment!  Everyone else has much better advice about recovery and health options, just wanted to let you know that lots of people here struggle with either motor skills (shaking, etc.) or vision difficulties and there are quite a few tricks to compensate for physical frailties.  Once you're feeling better and know what you're working with you'll probably be able to find some helpful suggestions.  

 

Best wishes for a speedy recovery!

 

if you're capable of reading a screen and typing, and it hasn't affected your ability to write with a pen, you probably haven't lost much, if any, of your painting ability. If the event has in any way hampered your ability to paint for whatever reason - vision, motor control, etc. - lots of practice will help you get back what you can regain, and the rest can be compensated for...

 

(Hell, I've been painting for more than thirty years despite suffering a complete lack of talent, lol. Honestly, though, I have some minor issues with both motor control and vision myself, and it hasn't hampered me much.)

 

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Sorry to hear you were hit by one.

I hope you will recover quickly.

 

Both my parents suffered from a T.I.A. in the past.

Both regained all their functions again in time.

 

Listen to the doctors, adjust your lifestyle if needed.

Most people regain a lot or all of their functions after a T.I.A. it might take a while though.

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My mother had a series of T.I.A.s across about 4-5 days last fall. Unfortunately, they were unable to find any proximate cause at the time, and eventually discharged her. In this case, the symptoms went away after a relatively short time.

 

My understanding is that there are many possible causes for this kind of attack. At the time, they searched for neurological and cardiovascular causes, but could find none. Since that time, we have discovered another serious health issue, but, unfortunately, there is no definite way for us to connect it to her previous attacks. :down:

 

I'm sorry I could not be more help, and I hope you recover swiftly.

Edited by klarg1
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Thank you all for the replies.  It is a scary thing to go through.   Did anyone have any weird changes?  I also heard music and voices, all not really understandable but it was there for a few days.  And no I am not a nut job lol.   I also have MS so my Neurologists thinks it might be a MS event but, it would be almost exactly the same thing.  As of right now, it is still a TIA.  I woke up the day after I got home from the Hospital and had a new mission and knew that I was changing thins in my life, like quitting Caffeine and totally changing my diet completely.  The food and soda tastes different so it's not hard.  Whether it is a psychosomatic or a change of the brain somehow, I don't know which but , I know it happened.  

I am laser focused on changing things and not letting this happen again.   Now, I have to see my regular doctor and make sure I don't go to fast or to hard.  I don't want to do this again.  Thank you all again for you input and anything else  you can share to help, is greatly appreciated.

D

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3 hours ago, torrenofamber said:

 And no I am not a nut job lol.  

 

I woke up the day after I got home from the Hospital and had a new mission and knew that I was changing thins in my life, like quitting Caffeine and totally changing my diet completely. 

 

 

 

Technically, we're all a little brain damaged now. :lol:

 

I applaud you for taking control of your health while you can.  IMO you shouldn't give up on caffeine until you look at the benefits of it, or unless it is having an actively detrimental effect on you.  Like wine, a cup or two can actually be a good thing and part of a healthy diet. 

 

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My sympathies, and thanks for posting! I haven't had a TIA, but I do have several friends who have. And I am myself recovering from a TBI (concussion) I sustained 6 months ago.

 

I highly recommend seeing various rehab specialists, so you can get the best idea of where your impairments are and what the most efficient way of improving is. My concussion recovery has involved physical therapy, speech therapy, and occupational therapy, in addition to the regular doctors visits.

 

Be patient with yourself, and let yourself grieve if necessary. I wish you all the best in your recovery!

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