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Leviathan

Question on metal assembly

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6 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:

It's not drying out that's the issue, that can happen to anything, but contamination. 

When the two parts comes in contact with each other the hardening process starts. It just doesn't penetrate far because the materials are so hard, so they don't really mix.    

And any handling of the strips, such as unrolling a coil will cause the process to spread further.     

 

 

Not fully convinced. I've gotten some "new", no evidence of unrolling or handling, milliput, and one block was too hard to work. No contact between the two pieces. 

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54 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

 

Not fully convinced. I've gotten some "new", no evidence of unrolling or handling, milliput, and one block was too hard to work. No contact between the two pieces. 

 

Depending on how it's packaged, I'm pretty sure there can be minor outgassing from the components resulting in curing even when the parts aren't mixed.

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5 hours ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

Depending on how it's packaged, I'm pretty sure there can be minor outgassing from the components resulting in curing even when the parts aren't mixed.

 

Oof. Okay. 

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Also, Milliput REALLY doesn't like being stored in warm places.  

The package I bought from CMON during their sale was completely knackered. Both parts were hard. 

 

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Hello again, I figured I'd give an update. I went to the city for a hobby store, but the only green stuff they had was liquid green stuff from citadel, which upon homecoming turned out to be rock solid. Still, it was serviceable after watering it down some. Now after a lot of trial and error (and copious amounts of nail polish remover for badly applied superglue) I got it in one piece. It's not perfect but it will do for a first time. I'll apply primer and paint next, which should go better as I've already practiced with some bones minis. Thanks for the tips.

 

IMG_20190405_125233.jpg

IMG_20190405_125251.jpg

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Looks like it worked out well, including any gaps seeming to be filled. What I might suggest for any bones or metal parts or pieces that need to be attached would be E6000 craft cement. (Can be used for basing work or attaching mini to a base too) You can get it at Michaels or I am sure at Hobby Lobby. It is a bit flexible and fills gaps and if you are messy putting it on you can roll/rub it off.

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21 hours ago, Leviathan said:

Hello again, I figured I'd give an update. I went to the city for a hobby store, but the only green stuff they had was liquid green stuff from citadel, which upon homecoming turned out to be rock solid. Still, it was serviceable after watering it down some. Now after a lot of trial and error (and copious amounts of nail polish remover for badly applied superglue) I got it in one piece. It's not perfect but it will do for a first time. I'll apply primer and paint next, which should go better as I've already practiced with some bones minis. Thanks for the tips.

 

 

Those pots are notorious for letting in air, so it's no wonder if the contents dried up.  

As you may guess from the fact that you could water it down, it's not an epoxy. ;-) 

In fact, you can probably make something very similar by mixing acrylic medium and some coloured filler material. Or just talcum powder...   

 

One big issue with LGS is that it's susceptible to anything that also damages/removes paint. So if you ever decide to give it a 'restart' using Simple Green or some nailpolish remover, you'll end up having to redo the work you did with the LGS. 

It's the price to pay for the convenience, I guess. 

 

If you don't intend to use the LGS for  while, I'd suggest wrapping electrical tape around the pot to seal it up a bit better.   

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“Liquid Green Stuff” is Games Workshop’s proprietary name for acrylic molding paste (also called modelling paste) with green coloring added so they can associate it with real “Green Stuff,” which is a proper two-part epoxy.

 

Acrylic molding paste can be gotten at art supply stores in small well-sealed jars that will last for ages at our scale of use for considerably cheaper than GW charges. The only difference will be that it is a dull off-white, as it is made from marble dust or a similar filler in acrylic medium.

 

As a gap filler acrylic molding paste works best for smaller cracks and gaps. Unlike epoxy, it shrinks as it dries. If one is filling a wider gap several smaller applications allowed to dry before adding the next are better than one big one. At a certain level of gap epoxy putty is probably a better option.

 

Acrylic molding paste doesn’t have the adhesive qualities of true Green Stuff( which is, after all, epoxy). You can’t rely on it to hold parts together.

 

As @Gadgetman! says, if you do anything to strip the paint from the figure, it will affect the acrylic molding paste as well.

 

The advantages of acrylic molding paste are convenience and relative lack of health hazards. It can be handled like acrylic paint, thinned with water and cleaned up with water, and it lacks the toxicity issues of epoxy resin. Also it has a longer shelf life (so long as it is not in those horrible little non-airtight GW pots).

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On 4/6/2019 at 5:26 AM, Pingo said:

“Liquid Green Stuff” is Games Workshop’s proprietary name for acrylic molding paste (also called modelling paste) with green coloring added so they can associate it with real “Green Stuff,” which is a proper two-part epoxy.

 

Acrylic molding paste can be gotten at art supply stores in small well-sealed jars that will last for ages at our scale of use for considerably cheaper than GW charges. The only difference will be that it is a dull off-white, as it is made from marble dust or a similar filler in acrylic medium.

 

As a gap filler acrylic molding paste works best for smaller cracks and gaps. Unlike epoxy, it shrinks as it dries. If one is filling a wider gap several smaller applications allowed to dry before adding the next are better than one big one. At a certain level of gap epoxy putty is probably a better option.

 

Acrylic molding paste doesn’t have the adhesive qualities of true Green Stuff( which is, after all, epoxy). You can’t rely on it to hold parts together.

 

As @Gadgetman! says, if you do anything to strip the paint from the figure, it will affect the acrylic molding paste as well.

 

The advantages of acrylic molding paste are convenience and relative lack of health hazards. It can be handled like acrylic paint, thinned with water and cleaned up with water, and it lacks the toxicity issues of epoxy resin. Also it has a longer shelf life (so long as it is not in those horrible little non-airtight GW pots).

 

If you are using modeling paste to fill the gaps on white bones you can mix in some craft paint to give it some color, making it easier to see. I made my own liquid "green stuff" like this when filling in minor gaps while assembling Khanjira. 

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